In Pictures

In pictures: The other side of Sanaa

The Yemeni capital, Sanaa, has been gripped by political turmoil and violence - but amid the upheaval, ordinary life goes on. BBC Arabic's Radwa Gamal reveals the other side to Sanaa in photographs.

Image copyright Radwa Gamal/BBC
Image caption The Old City of Sanaa is a popular tourist destination in Yemen with the unique architectural design of its centuries-old buildings. However, tourist numbers are down because of the security situation in the country
Image copyright Radwa Gamal/BBC
Image caption At street level, the evidence of gun battles between various armed political factions - which first erupted in 2011 during the uprising that forced President Ali Abdullah Saleh to step down, but are still regular occurrences - is clearly visible on many buildings
Image copyright Radwa Gamal/BBC
Image caption Graffiti painted by young activists document the cases of people who disappeared during Mr Saleh's 33 years in power
Image copyright Radwa Gamal/BBC
Image caption A memorial for those killed on 18 March 2011 in Sanaa, known as the "Friday of Dignity" and considered a turning point in the uprising against Mr Saleh. More than 50 people died and hundreds were injured when troops and Saleh loyalists opened fire on protesters demanding the president's resignation.
Image copyright Radwa Gamal/BBC
Image caption A man spreading seeds for birds to eat over his father’s grave. In Yemen, it is believed that this will bring peace and mercy upon the deceased
Image copyright Radwa Gamal/BBC
Image caption The Saleh Mosque, Yemen’s largest, was opened in 2008. The extravagant place of worship was named after the former president. Its $60m (£37m) price tag caused controversy in the Arab World’s poorest country, where nearly half the population lives on less than $2 (£1.2) per day.
Image copyright Radwa Gamal/BBC
Image caption Soldiers have been deployed at military checkpoints set up by the authorities every few kilometres across Sanaa in an attempt to control the widespread flow of weapons inside the capital. Last month, there were fierce clashes in Sanaa between government forces Zaidi Shia Houthi rebels, who demanded the restoration of fuel subsidies
Image copyright Radwa Gamal/BBC
Image caption In Yemen, weapons are considered a symbol of manhood and pride. There is estimated to be at least twice as many guns in the country as citizens.
Image copyright Radwa Gamal/BBC
Image caption Janbiyas are curved handmade daggers that almost all men in Yemen wear as an accessory. It is wedged into a thick belt and is commonly used in ceremonial dances, but it can still be used as a weapon in case of a dispute
Image copyright Radwa Gamal/BBC
Image caption Elsewhere in the south-western district of Hadda, students head to school
Image copyright Radwa Gamal/BBC
Image caption Back in Sanaa's Old City is a market that dates back to the pre-Islamic era
Image copyright Radwa Gamal/BBC
Image caption Khat, a mildly narcotic plant that is grown all over Yemen, is also on sale at markets in Sanaa. Chewing Khat is a daily habit for many Yemenis. However, economists have warned that Khat is consuming too much of Yemen’s scarce water resources.

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