In Pictures

In pictures: Living beside the tracks

Image copyright Paola Nunez Solorio
Image caption The railway that runs the length of Vietnam begins its journey in the country's capital Hanoi, passing just a few inches from homes and businesses that line the route in the Old Quarter of the city.

Image copyright Paola Nunez Solorio
Image caption Photographer Paola Nunez Solorio was captivated by those who live on either side of the tracks.
Image copyright Paola Nunez Solorio
Image caption Her work focuses on the families who are living in such close proximity to the railway, picturing their belongings and living spaces.
Image copyright Paola Nunez Solorio
Image caption Nunez Solorio said: "This phenomenon was very interesting to me because I have seen a similar situation in several parts of the world, where the train rail, once a symbol of progress and prosperity, has attracted people living in poverty to live in its surroundings, probably because it has provided some means of survival."
Image copyright Paola Nunez Solorio
Image caption Once it leaves Hanoi, the railway runs for more than 1,000 miles before it reaches its final destination in the south of the country, Ho Chi Minh City.
Image copyright Paola Nunez Solorio
Image caption The railway was completed in the 1930s during French colonial rule and is now run by state-owned Vietnam Railways.
Image copyright Paola Nunez Solorio
Image caption Nunez Solorio's pictures are often devoid of people, yet their belongings fill almost every free inch of space.
Image copyright Paola Nunez Solorio
Image caption Plans to build a high speed connection between the two cities have been raised from time to time, though the cost has proved prohibitive and the latest plans look to upgrade the existing route in order to reduce the current journey time of around 30 hours.

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