In Pictures

In pictures: Solar eclipse

People across the UK and northern Europe have gathered to see the best solar eclipse in years. A path across the Earth's surface was plunged into darkness when the Moon covered up the Sun.

Image copyright Haakon Mosvold Larsen/ap
Image caption The Faroe Islands and Svalbard in the Arctic Circle were the only places to experience a total eclipse.
Image copyright Matt Dunham/ap
Image caption People gathered for the start of a total solar eclipse in Torshavn in the Faroe Islands. Hotels in the area had been fully booked for months. Stargazers in the town got totality for a full two minutes, which started just before 09:41 GMT.
Image copyright Ben Birchall/PA
Image caption Early signs of the eclipse were seen over the domes of the Eden Project near St Austell in Cornwall.
Image copyright Michael Sohn/ap
Image caption Experts warned people not to look directly at the Sun because it could cause serious harm. Here a boy poses for a photograph wearing protective goggles in Berlin, Germany.
Image copyright Owen Humphreys/PA
Image caption The UK will not see a solar eclipse on this scale again until 2026.
Image copyright Toby Melville/reuters
Image caption Despite some cloud, photographer Toby Melville captured this frame near Bridgwater in south west England.
Image copyright Claire Hayhurst/PA
Image caption Students Greg Robertson and Sam Firminger waited for the eclipse at Clifton Observatory in Bristol.
Image copyright Ben Birchall/PA
Image caption Total eclipses occur, on average, every 18 months somewhere on our planet.
Image copyright Luca Bruno/ap
Image caption A statue on top of Milan's cathedral in Italy was photographed as though embracing the Sun.
Image copyright Claire Hayhurst/PA
Image caption A homemade pin hole camera was spotted at Clifton Observatory in Bristol.
Image copyright Gareth Fuller/PA
Image caption Members of the Mid Kent Astronomical Society hoped for a glimpse of the eclipse on the coast in Grain.
Image copyright ENNIO LEANZA/epa
Image caption Teenagers waited to watch the spectacle of a partial solar eclipse in Zurich, Switzerland
Image copyright Owen Humphreys/PA
Image caption Today's eclipse marked the last total solar eclipse in Europe for over a decade. The next one will appear on 12 August 2026.
Image copyright Ben Birchall/PA
Image caption A woman used a piece of card with a pinhole in the centre to view the eclipse safely.
Image copyright Matt Dunham/ap
Image caption Apart from a television light people watched in darkness during totality in Torshavn in the Faroe Islands.
Image copyright HAAKON MOSVOLD LARSEN/epa
Image caption The total solar eclipse as seen at Svalbard in Norway.
Image copyright HAAKON MOSVOLD LARSEN/epa
Image caption The last major eclipse was back in 1999 which is why everyone was so keen to catch a glimpse of Friday's event.