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Summary

  1. BBC Wales has been at King's Square, Barry, for day 1 of the election tour
  2. Online, television and radio took the political temperature
  3. Just 17 days until polling
  4. Voters, school children and studio guests have been having their say on the big issues

Live Reporting

All times stated are UK

Get involved

That's all from our live page reporting team - Elise Jenkins, Mike Burgess, Rhiannon Beacham and Nicola Bryan - for today. We'll be back on Wednesday from Guildhall Square in Carmarthen.

trucks
BBC
Eleri Sion and guest
BBC

BBC Radio Wales presenter Eleri Sion chats to Barnaby Hibbert, who runs The Gallery restaurant which has won an award for sustainability.

'Poverty'

Eileen Preen
BBC

Eileen Preen, 80, said: "I'm worried about poverty in Barry. It's important to give to charity.

"Me and my husband are better off now than we've ever been in our lives but we've saved been careful with our money.

"I feel upset thinking of my mother and knowing she didn't have the life I've had. I'm going to vote, I always have."

Mother-of-five Sandra Westall, 57, said: "The health service is on the decline. Mental health is under-resourced.

"Something needs to be done about immigration. There are not enough jobs to go around.

Sandra Westall
BBC

"I haven't decided who to vote for yet, but I will definitely vote."

Tim Jones, 62, from Barry, keeps us guessing...

tim Jones
BBC

Jamie Owen live from Barry

Jamie live
BBC
tent
BBC

BBC Wales is broadcasting from the tent at King's Square, Barry, throughout the day

Wales Today gearing up

BBC Wales Today presenter Jamie Owen is gearing up to go live from the tour at 13:30 BST.

jamie owen
BBC

Behind the scenes

Stef Messenger
BBC

Behind the scenes... youth correspondent Steff Messenger edits interviews being fed back to BBC Broadcasting House

Meanwhile, back at the tent, the BBC Radio Wales' Good Evening Wales programme will be asking people in Barry whether the town's economy is the most important thing to them. Hear that or come and join in between 16:30 and 18:00 BST.

Those who come along can also choose whether to drop a coloured ball into the yes box or no box, too.

GEW team
BBC

'Voting matters'

Pets 'R' Us manager Ian Bosley, 22, said he was going to vote.

"It matters because it will determine how businesses like this are run.

"Big companies are taking over and stamping out small companies. People need to shop local.

"Small businesses need more help to stay open."

Ian Bosley
BBC

'Voting is important'

Owner of Color Nails Club, Huyen Thi, is from Vietnam and has run her business for five years.

The mother-of-two said: "Barry is a good place to run a business. It's really friendly.

"I think we get a pretty good deal here. There's lots of parking. I'm happy with the rent.

"Compared to Vietnam we have things very good here. It's easier to get a good school here than it is in London.

"I'm going to vote. It's important."

Huyen Thi
BBC

'Get out of EU'

William Tinto, 79, wants out of the EU.

He said: "I voted to join the EEC but it's developed into a pantomime. I've got no time whatsoever for them.

"I've traditionally lived in Labour areas all my life but I've always voted to keep Labour out."

Williams Tinto
BBC

'Haven't thought about voting'

His friend Jordon Olsen, 18, added: "I'm not sure what I want to do for a living but languages are always good to have.

"It's hard getting a job and I think college will make it easier. I feel optimistic about the future.

"I haven't thought about voting."

'Stuck up politicians'

Tony Barnett, 18, at youth training provider The People Business, said: "I'm not going to vote. I think it's all boring. I think politicians are stuck up."

The People Business
BBC

'Barry is rubbish'

Ann went on: "Our town Barry is now rubbish. Shop rents are too high and local people can't afford the rent. I'd like to see things like haberdashers and delis.

"I'd never move from Barry. I love it.

"We're going to lose our library and that's not right."

Ann Wright told us: "Waiting lists on the NHS are terrible. I'm waiting for a scan on my leg.

"I'm diabetic. I've been waiting and waiting for an operation to have stents."

Ann Wright
BBC

Resident Fred, 65, told us: "Yes, I'm going to vote - the most important thing to me is the health service. It's difficult to get a doctor's appointment and that's why so many people end up going to the hospital."

Ruby Nash, 27, has lived in Barry for 15 years and has two kids - including Cody, five, who has Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

She's been campaigning for a house that's suitable for him.

"My worry is that my son is going to become a prisoner on his own home. The the corridors are too narrow for his wheelchair. We can't afford a hoist to get him in and out of the bath because the house is not structurally strong enough to hold it."

Ruby Nash
BBC

"Government needs to step in to ensure that local authorities have suitable housing stock for disabled tenants."

Anthony Musto, 28, said his dad has owned Lacucina coffee shop for 8 years.

"I want to buy my own house. I rent with my fiancee at the moment. It's hard to save a deposit when you're renting because rent is so expensive. The government needs to help first time buyers.

"Inheritance tax doesn't make sense. You pay tax all your life and then you've got to again when you're dead. It's unfair.

"I don't think that putting minimum wage up is a good idea."

Anthony Musto
BBC

Our reporters Rhiannon Beacham and Nicola Bryan have been out and about in Barry town centre speaking to voters about the issues affecting them...

job centre
BBC

The local job centre in Barry has been boarded up

After being escorted from the tent, Gary Fifield, 53, from Barry, told our reporter Rhiannon Beacham he had never worked in his life: "I want a proper training system that works, no fees, I want to go to work but I can't.

"I've been bounced around all the schemes like a football - couldn't have an apprenticeship because I'm dyslexic."

Gary Fifield
BBC

The morning wasn't without controversy, though... an audience member had to be removed from the tent for shouting during the live broadcast, "there ain't no work"

The panel discussed election issues - including the economy and job employment

Presenter Ollie Hides was joined by parliamentary corr David Cornock and candidates Kevin Mahoney (UKIP), Alan Cairns Conservative), Christopher Elmore (Labour), David Morgan (Lib Dem) and Ian Johnson (Plaid Cymru)

ollie hides and panel
BBC
ollie hides and panel
BBC

BBC Radio Wales has been broadcasting from the tent since 6am - debating election issues with guests and prospective candidates in the Vale of Glamorgan

The tent is getting busy

school kids
BBC

School children are working hard in the election tent on the #ineverknew project