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Summary

  1. We are trying out a new format for our news coverage. This is a test live page.
  2. Insurance companies are to be banned from covering the cost of terrorist ransoms
  3. British banker ruled fit to stand trial for the murder of two women in Hong Kong
  4. Diplomats making final push for deal on Iran's nuclear programme

Live Reporting

By Matthew Davis and Gerry Holt

All times stated are UK

That concludes our live coverage for this morning.

Anti-terror measures

Theresa May
BBC

Watch live as Theresa May unveils new measures to tackle terrorism in the UK.

Google 'web abuse' case

Clive Coleman

Legal correspondent, BBC News

has been on the BBC News Channel, analysing the

breaking news that a case against Google over online abuse has been settled.

"The case was very significant, but rather dramatically it settled last night, late last night we are being told... The result is that while there is no firm ruling from the court, the settlement will give hope to people whop have been on the receiving end of this kind of really vile internet harassment and trolling."

Occupy
PA

Activists from the Occupy movement held their

latest campaign in London over the weekend.

The protest movement, now three years old, has global recognition. But,

asks BBC Magazine's Lucy Townsend, how can its impact be measured?

NHS workers' strike

Strike image
RCM

Thousands of NHS workers in England and Northern Ireland, including nurses, midwives and ambulance staff, have just finished their four-hour strike.

What do the workers want?

Latest headlines

Insurance firms will be banned from covering the cost of terrorist ransoms under

a raft of measures being unveiled shortly by the home secretary.

A museum in Switzerland has agreed to accept hundreds of artworks bequeathed by the German Nazi-era art hoarder Cornelius Gurlitt.

A judge in South Africa is considering a

request to drop the case against Shrien Dewani, who's accused of having his wife murdered.

Thousands of health service workers in England and Northern Ireland have been

staging a four-hour strike.

Iran nuclear talks

As the clock ticks on the Iranian nuclear talks, BBC News looks at

more than 60 years of tricky relations between Iran and the US.

BreakingBreaking News

The case of a UK businessman who wants Google to stop malicious postings about him appearing in search results

is settled in court.

Band Aid 30

Band Aid single
PA

Band Aid 30 mastermind Bob Geldof is urging people to keep downloading Do They Know It's Christmas? over and over again.

But BBC Newsbeat has detected a problem...

Once you've spent your 99p on the charity single for Ebola, you've spent it. Even if you delete the track from your iTunes or Google Play library, you can't buy it again with the same account.

Can it be done another way?

Find out here.

Prince Charles letters

Peter Hunt

Royal correspondent, BBC News

takes a closer look at

Prince Charles's bid to keep letters he wrote to government ministers private. - the case is in court today.

"This has been a lengthy and costly legal battle which should be nearing its end. The focus on how Prince Charles operates has greater significance the closer he gets to the throne. We know he'll be a different monarch to his mother, but just how different?

The Guardian newspaper and the prince's critics argue the public has a right to know what influence he exerts behind the scenes. His supporters maintain he has a duty to contact ministers in private and his way of operating will change when he is king. In the coming months, unless there's a referral on an issue of European law to the Court of Justice in Luxembourg, we'll have a resolution."

Prince Charles
PA

Anti-terror measures

Frank Gardner

BBC security correspondent

tells the BBC News Channel: "I think it will be news to most people that it was legal to pay money to terrorists. I thought it wasn't, I must say, although people have always been allowed to pay money to pirate hijackers."

"... there is a big debate going on in Washington and London at the moment on the wisdom of Britain and America [not paying ransom demands to terrorists]. Some people are saying that if other countries can't stick to this, maybe Britain and America should [pay]. But that's really tough on those families who have watched their loved ones get killed in the past because of the tough policy on this."

Anti-terror measures

Dominic Casciani

Home affairs correspondent, BBC News

takes a closer look at the supposed aim of the

counter-terrorism measures expected to be announced later.

"For a decade, British security and intelligence agencies have tried to counter threats from individuals inspired by al-Qaeda's ideology. They're worried that the emergence of Islamic State has made that job far harder.

Twice before - in the wake of 9/11 and 7/7 - they asked ministers for more powers. Each time there has been a difficult debate about the balance between those powers and personal liberties. This coming Counter Terrorism and Security Bill - which is aimed at disrupting extremist activity - will face the same questions."

More from Dominic on the new powers here.

Ferguson shooting

A protest in St Louis
Getty Images

The community of Ferguson is waiting to hear whether a US grand jury will indict Darren Wilson, the white police officer who shot dead Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, in August. The jury is set to meet at 17:00 GMT.

The BBC's Joanna Jolly is in the Missouri city where she finds

a mix of anxiety and fear ahead of the ruling.

Read more about

what a grand jury is and how it works here.

And further

background to the Ferguson shooting and subsequent protests here.

Today's papers

Theresa May's admission the government has been "blown off course" in its attempts to curb immigration is picked over by many of today's newspapers.

Daily Telegraph
BBC

The Daily Telegraph

reminds readers of David Cameron's previous pledge that migration would be down to under 100,000 before the general election.

The Daily Mail says the abandonment of this pledge has

triggered a "furious political row".

Read a full round-up here.

Latest headlines

Insurance firms will be banned from covering the cost of terrorist ransoms under

a raft of measures being unveiled by the home secretary.

Hundreds of thousands of health workers are

being called out on strike this morning in a dispute about pay.

A judge in South Africa is considering a

request to drop the case against Shrien Dewani, who's accused of having his wife murdered.

US police have shot and killed a 12-year-old boy who was carrying what turned out to be a fake gun.

Iran nuclear talks

Time is running out for a world powers to strike a deal with Iran to cut UN sanctions in return for action to scale back its nuclear programme. Diplomats from six major nations and Iran are meeting in Vienna, and face a 23:00 GMT deadline to resolve a dispute that has lasted 12 years.

What do we know about Iran's key nuclear sites?

Map
BBC

Anti-terror measures

Watch live as the UK's lead officer on counter-terrorism launches a week-long police initiative to make the public more aware of how they can help fight terrorism.

Google 'web abuse' case

Clive Coleman

Legal correspondent, BBC News

deciphers why

a businessman is asking Google to stop malicious web postings about him appearing in search results.

"This case is not a so-called right to be forgotten case - a case where Google is being asked to remove old but accurate reports of some behaviour which Daniel Hegglin finds embarrassing.

It is about arguably something much more important - the circulation and publication of highly abusive and false material accessible at the click of a mouse in the online world.

It goes to the heart of what is a very modern nightmare - the fact that anyone can post malicious material anonymously online, which can have a devastating effect on the life of the victim."

'Nintendo' fighter jet

Flight simulator
BBC

What is it like to fly a F-35 fighter jet?

BBC Click's Dave Lee

got to try out the simulator used to train pilots.

Replica gun death

Tamir Rice
BBC

The police killing of 12-year-old Tamir Rice (above), who was

shot in a playground after waving what turned out to be a replica gun, has thrown the US debate on firearms back into the spotlight.

The BBC's Debbie Siegelbaum

looked into firearms use among children in the US following a recent tragedy involving a real weapon, and found that those who use them often start young.

Child with gun
BBC

Iran nuclear talks

Jeremy Bowen

BBC Middle East editor

gives his take on the

last big push to reach a deal over Tehran's nuclear programme.

"Success would do much to lift Iran's isolation - which would change the strategic balance in the Middle East. That intrigues some Western diplomats. It horrifies Saudi Arabia and Israel.

A year ago in Geneva all sides in the talks saw an opportunity to deal with an issue that could potentially cause another catastrophic war. That will make them very reluctant to leave Vienna empty-handed - even if that means they will have to do more work on the details next year.

Time is limited though. Hardliners in Tehran and Washington DC will try to sabotage any agreement. Both see no reason to dilute their mutual suspicion."

Hong Kong murder

Sumarti
BBC

As British banker Rurik Jutting is ruled fit to stand trial for the murder of two women in Hong Kong, BBC Indonesia editor Karishma Vaswani has been tracing the victim Sumarti Ningsih's journey from rural Java to death in the big city.

"Sumarti was generous. That much is clear from the evidence in the house. Her driving force was to improve life for her family, to make them richer. Life may be peaceful in the village but she would have been all too aware of the possibilities of a life with more material comforts."

Read the full article.

Anti-terror measures

Britain's most senior police officer has been speaking about the terror threat to the UK ahead of the home secretary's announcement at 11:30 today of a raft of counter-terrorism measures.

Speaking to the BBC on Sunday, Met police commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe said there had been a "change to the frequency and the seriousness" with four or five terror plots stopped this year.

Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe
BBC

Latest headlines

Insurance firms will be banned from covering the cost of terrorist ransoms under a raft of measures being unveiled by the home secretary.

Hundreds of thousands of health workers are

being called out on strike this morning in a dispute about pay.

US police have shot and killed a 12-year-old boy who was carrying what turned out to be a fake gun.

A newborn baby has

survived for up to five days in a roadside drain in Australia.