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Summary

  1. Late DJ and TV presenter Jimmy Savile abused 63 people at Stoke Mandeville Hospital, a report finds on 26 February
  2. Nine informal complaints of sexual behaviour not taken seriously - one formal complaint should have been reported to police
  3. Savile's abuse at Stoke Mandeville was an "open secret" as early as 1973 and he was regarded as a "sex pest"
  4. A separate report finds "elements of the Savile story" could happen again

Live Reporting

By Vanessa Barford, Alex Therrien, Paul Gribben and Rob Corp

All times stated are UK

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has said 13 of Kate Lampard's recommendations will be accepted. All trusts are being asked to review their current practices within three months against the recommendations and provide details of their plans and progress.

A separate report by former barrister and NHS executive Kate Lampard into how Savile could have abused victims at 41 NHS hospitals, offered findings including:

  • Elements of the Savile story could happen again, and there will always be people who try to gain undue influence within institutions such as hospitals
  • Society has a "weakness for celebrities" and hospitals must be aware of the risks
  • There is a "need for us to examine safeguarding arrangements in NHS hospitals, the raising of complaints and matters of concern, and how managers and staff respond to complaints"

A quick recap of the latest reports into abuse by Jimmy Savile before we bring this live page coverage to a close.

The Stoke Mandeville report found Savile was an "opportunistic predator" who, from 1968 to 1992, abused 63 people connected to the hospital who ranged in age from eight to 40. It said Savile's reputation as a "sex pest" was an "open secret" among junior staff and some middle managers. Several victims made informal complaints to staff but none was "taken seriously or escalated to senior management". One formal complaint was made in 1977 by the father of a victim and should have been reported to police. Senior management at the hospital were probably never told about Savile's inappropriate behaviour or about the sexual assault claims.

Mark Easton

Home editor

tweets: Did the Thatcher govt unwittingly facilitate Jimmy Savile's crimes? The inquiries think so.
My blog

Mr Burnham also called for the government to put into law Labour proposals to make staff in certain professions have a mandatory duty to report abuse to the police.

"None of today's reports suggest that anyone within government knew that Savile was a predatory sex abuser. But they are clear that in 'putting aside the policy and frameworks that existed, they helped create a situation where he could abuse," the BBC's Home editor writes.

screen saying: "Jimmy Savile investigations & lessons learnt" plus Kate Lampard in camera viewfinder
Getty Images

BBC Home editor

Mark Easton writes in his blog: How could this be allowed to happen?

"The answers are many and various, today's investigation into his activities at Stoke Mandeville concludes, before adding that 'one of the most compelling is quite simply that the basic building blocks of legislation, policy and procedure designed to maintain both public safety and probity were bypassed'."

Shadow health secretary Andy Burnham told the Commons: "What changes today with the Stoke Mandeville report is that it is now no longer possible to say that while the abuse was widespread that it was not known to people in senior positions.

"Knowing what we now know we simply cannot just leave this here. Victims must have accountability and that must be our shared goal across this House," he said.

All trusts will be asked to review their current practices within three months against the recommendations and provide details of their plans and progress, Mr Hunt said.

A bit more on those 13 recommendations from Kate Lampard's report that Mr Hunt said the government would accept. They include trusts developing policies on visits by celebrities, internet and social media access and a review of voluntary service arrangements and safeguarding resources.

"The department, along with its arms-length bodies, will examine the possible development of a forum for NHS voluntary service managers, raising awareness of safeguarding referrals among NHS employers and to what extent NHS trust staff and volunteers should undergo refresher training and safeguarding," he added.

Mr Hunt was responding to shadow health secretary Andy Burnham, who spoke in the Commons of the need to help the victims. "Can you say more about whether the value left in Savile's estate is anywhere near enough to provide adequate compensation to the very many victims of his abuse?

"And can you say whether you have made any judgment yet on whether there is a need for public funding to help compensate his victims?", Mr Burnham had asked.

£4m will be made available for compensation claims by Jimmy Savile's victims, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has announced, saying the money from Savile's estate and the serial sex abuser's charities will be made available for claims from his victims.

If that money is exhausted claims could be funded from the public purse, he added.

Savile's abuse was thought to have begun in the mid-1940s, when he was in his late teens or early 20s, and lasted until 2009, two years before his death. As the latest round of reports into his sexual behaviour at NHS hospitals are published, the BBC looks at the

background to the abuse scandal surrounding him.

The subject of these investigations, Jimmy Savile, died in 2011 a year before he was exposed as a paedophile.

Here's a profile of the former DJ and TV presenter.

Jimmy Savile on Top of the Pops in 1975
BBC

A bit more from Mr Burnham in the Commons earlier: "It literally beggars belief, that abuse on this scale known to so many people was allowed to go on for so long. But as the analysis of what happened becomes more complete, and the full picture emerges, the question that will be growing in the minds of people hearing this news today is this - where is the accountability?"

On Stoke Mandeville, Mr Hunt said there were no suggestions ministers or officials knew about Savile's activities but accepted governance processes were not followed.

He said ministers made the expedient decision to use Savile not just to raise funds to redevelop Stoke Mandeville's national spinal injuries centre but to oversee the building and running of the centre even though he had "no relevant experience".

Making a statement in the Commons earlier, Mr Hunt also said three new investigations were under way at Humber NHS Trust, Mersey Care NHS Trust and Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust. "Any further allegations received will of course be investigated as serious incidents," he added.

Hugh Pym

Health editor

tweets: Jeremy Hunt leaves door open on mandatory reporting of suspicions by NHS/school staff - consultation on it - supported by Labour

This is a "dark chapter" of the history of the NHS and our country, the shadow health secretary says.

Mr Burnham says he wants to know that every possible step is being taken to make sure that volunteers or fundraisers in hospitals are properly vetted.

Hugh Pym

Health editor

tweets: Andy Burnham calls for more formal inquiry into role of Dept of Health,ministers,hospital chiefs in giving Savile power at Stoke Mandeville

Labour's Andy Burnham says one of the report's findings, that many elements of the Savile story could be repeated today, is "chilling".

Mr Burnham asks Mr Hunt to clarify what counselling and support is being offered victims.

Shadow health secretary Andy Burnham says there is a need for a more formal inquiry process and victims must have accountability.

Hugh Pym

Health editor

tweets: Jeremy Hunt accepts most of Kate Lampard recommendations but not her call for all hospital volunteers to have enhanced/barred list checks

A Downing Street spokeswoman says: "The prime minister's view is that it is horrific that these abuses were allowed to go on for so long and that we absolutely must look at what lessons can be learnt from today."

The spokeswoman announced that a consultation on possible mandatory reporting of child abuse will now be extended to cover vulnerable adults, and will go ahead as soon as possible.

Mr Hunt says it is clear from the reports that there should have been a "much stronger incentive" on staff and managers to pass information on to investigate, and that it was "clearly unacceptable".

Mr Hunt says to Savile's victims: "It our society's shame that you were ignored for so long, but it is a tribute to your bravery that we can take action today."

'We let them down'

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt: "Whilst no system can ever be totally secure from a manipulative and deceitful predator like Savile we learned last year that there were clear failings in the security, culture and processes of many NHS organisations, allowing terrible abuse to continue unchecked over many years.

"What happened was horrific, caused immeasurable and often permanent damage, and betrayed vulnerable people who trusted us to keep them safe. We let them down."

He cities hospital's policies on celebrities and important people as among them.

Mr Hunt says the government is accepting 13 recommendations from Kate Lampard's report.

We have a "collective responsibility" to make sure things are followed up and investigated properly, the health secretary says.

He says the "right questions, the hard questions" were not asked because people were either "too dazzled or intimidated" by Savile's celebrity status.

"Never again must the power of celebrity blind us," he says.

Jeremy Hunt says investigations have been "deeply harrowing" for victims and investigators, and thanked Kate Lampard for her report.

Queen Elizabeth Hospital Gateshead report

There were suggestions of "inappropriate behaviour" by Jimmy Savile towards staff at what was Bensham Hospital but no specific allegations, the hospital's trust said.

It was discovered that Savile visited Bensham Hospital (now part of Queen Elizabeth Gateshead) on one occasion as part of a charity presentation in March 1990.

The trust said he was accompanied by senior hospital staff at all times and none of the witnesses recall seeing anything they considered inappropriate.

Staff raised the issue of Jimmy Savile being tactile, including kissing and licking their hands but attributed his behaviour to his "known eccentricity", the report said.

Mr Hunt reiterates his apology on behalf of the government. "What happened was horrific and betrayed vulnerable people who trusted us to keep us safe. "We let them down." he says.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is speaking in the House of Commons.

A separate report by former barrister and NHS executive Kate Lampard reviewed how Savile could have abused victims at 41 NHS hospitals. It said:

- Elements of the Savile story could happen again, and there would always be people who tried to gain undue influence within institutions such as hospitals

- Society has a "weakness for celebrities" and hospitals must be aware of the risks

- There is a "need for us to examine safeguarding arrangements in NHS hospitals, the raising of complaints and matters of concern, and how managers and staff respond to complaints".

St Martin's Hospital, Canterbury

There was no evidence to connect Jimmy Savile with St Martin's Hospital in Canterbury, Kent, in 1969 or at any other time, a report by Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust concluded.

A former patient had said they were abused by Jimmy Savile at the hospital when they were about 21, in 1969.

The report said it was unlikely the person was treated at St Martin's Hospital in 1969 or that Savile visited the hospital.

Here's a recap of the main findings from the Stoke Mandeville report:

- Jimmy Savile was an "opportunistic predator" who abused 63 people, from 1968 to 1992 and were aged eight to 40, connected to Stoke Mandeville Hospital

- Savile's reputation as a "sex pest" was an "open secret" among junior staff and some middle managers

- Ten of Savile's victims did complain to staff but none of the nine informal complaints were "taken seriously or escalated to senior management". One formal complaint about a very serious assault on an 11-year-old patient was made in 1977 by the victim's father and should have been reported to police. It was later dropped

- Senior management at the hospital were probably never told about Savile's inappropriate behaviour or about the sexual assault claims.