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Summary

  1. MP hopefuls in the South West debate issues ahead of the general election
  2. The candidates taking part are:
  3. Anne Marie Morris, Conservative
  4. Ben Bradshaw, Labour
  5. Stephen Gilbert, Liberal Democrat
  6. Steve Crowther, UKIP
  7. Jacqi Hodgson, Green Party
  8. Get in touch on Twitter - #ge17sw

Live Reporting

By Chris Ellis and Sian Davies

All times stated are UK

Get involved

General election 2017: South West debate as it happened

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

That's all from the Local Live team for tonight. We're back with all the news, sport, travel and weather from 08:00 tomorrow.

Good night.

BBC Spotlight debate

General election 2017: Find your constituency and candidates

BBC Spotlight

All the candidates standing in the general election on 8 June are listed on the BBC News website.

Some 68 parties and 191 independent candidates contribute to a total of 3,304 people standing for Parliament this year - a decrease of 664 from 2015.

Use the search box or browse our A-Z listings to find your constituency and the candidates who are standing.

Brexit: How can the government safeguard university funding?

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

An important question was raised about young people and Brexit during our debate. Watch the question and answers here:

BBC Spotlight debate Brexit

Brexit: 'Nobody said anything about us losing our sovereignty'

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

Check out some of the audience's comments and questions during tonight's debate. Brexit got everybody talking.

BBC Spotlight debate Brexit

Housing: 'More control for private rental sector'

Labour's Ben Bradshaw said: "We have to free up local authorities to build houses.

"We need to do a lot more to control the private rental sector... it's not fair on future generations."

Ben Bradshaw
BBC

Housing: 'We need cheaper housing'

UKIP's Steve Crowther said: "We've got to take it out of the hands of large developers. They have sophisticated methods of getting planning permission, banking large amounts of land and deciding not to build on it.

"We need to do as we did after the war, we need new cheaper, but very much better, factory built housing, that can be built on compulsory purchase land, in small plots where needed, using local skills. On average, someone with a £26,000 salary will be able to buy a two-bedroom home."

Housing: 'We need to encourage developers to build'

Anne Marie Morris, from the Conservatives, said: "A white paper came out just before the election, we've been brave enough to say it [housing] is a problem.

"You need to increase more houses. We need to encourage developers to build. We are building more social housing.

"I don't believe councils, who do many things, should become experts in house building. Housing associations do a good job."

Housing: 'Councils should build council houses again'

Stephen Gilbert, from the Liberal Democrats, said: "We need to allow councils to build council houses again. That's a matter of urgency.

"We're talking about a rent-to-buy scheme, you pay your rent each month and over the 30 years you increase your equity - similar to a mortgage, but not quite.

"There's a generation who won't be able to get on the housing ladder."

What do you think?

Twitter

Have your say on Twitter - use #ge17sw

Housing: 'Young people driven away from South West'

Jacqi Hodgson, from the Green Party said: "For our young people we're actively driving them away from the South West.

"We need more houses, but not those of high cost. The so-called affordable are still out of the price bracket of most young people.

"Young people are caught in the rent trap. The planning framework needs to be seriously looked at."

Reality Check: Does it matter if you own your home or not?

Reality Check

Steph McGovern looks at why levels of home ownership and renting have been changing.

Reality Check: Does it matter if you own your home or not?

Panel quizzed on affordable homes

Tricia Sandford asked: "Given the South West has high property prices and relatively low wage levels, how are my two sons supposed to get on the property ladder? They have a problem getting the banks to lend them the amount of money needed to buy a property."

Trisha
BBC

Reality Check: How many people are homeless in England?

Reality Check

The Liberal Democrats have pledged to end "the scandal" of rough sleeping, in their general election manifesto.

As of autumn 2016, there were an estimated 4,134 people a night sleeping rough on England's streets, more than double the number in 2010 and a 16% increase on the year before.

These are estimates based on local authorities either conducting a street count on a single night or making an estimation based on intelligence gathered from local services.

Labour has also pledged to end rough sleeping within its first term in government by making 4,000 additional homes available for people with a history of being on the streets.

The Conservatives pledge to halve rough sleeping over the course of the next parliament and eliminate it by 2027 by establishing a homelessness reduction taskforce.

The Green Party say they would give local authorities the same duties towards single people and childless couples as to families, while UKIP don't have a specific policy on homelessness, but say they will take measures to address homelessness among veterans.

While UKIP don't have a specific policy on homelessness, but say they will take measures to address homelessness among veterans.

Social care: 'We're facing a massive demographic crisis'

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

Steve Crowther from UKIP says: "We're facing a massive demographic crisis in this country. Keeping the health service and social care separate are just ludicrous. We have to integrate the two things because the two things are the same.

"The UKIP manifesto basically says we will get money from all the places we can find it. That's £34bn over the next five years, even that is barely going to help us to cope with the situation that we're in.

"There is nothing more important."

Social care:' We're already paying enough'

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

The Green Party's Jacqi Hodgson says she wants to see a fully funded NHS with includes social care requirements - and says her party wouldn't fund Trident so more money could be spent on social care.

She said: "We've got a whole fear factor. Everything is based on fear. We're fearful of losing our education, fearful of losing schools, people who are worried about losing their local hospitals. There's been fear, fear, fear thrown in.

"This is just really unreasonable and to take the attitude of 'well people have got to pay', we're already paying."

Social care: Tories say cap 'should be debated'

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

Lib Dem Stephen Gilbert asks Anne Marie Morris what the social care cap will be set at - and she says it should be debated.

He adds: "I want to live in a country where if you get ill, if you require social care in later years, if you are older and vulnerable you are looked after by everybody else. That's how we judge our society."

Social care: 'Theresa offering better, not worse' deal

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

Anne Marie Morris says Mr Bradshaw hasn't interpreted the Conservative policy correctly.

She said: "Because social care is means tested, everything you have, including your home, can be used to meet the cost down to your last £23,000. There is no cap at the moment.

"What Theresa is suggesting is that there should be a cap and at the same time, if you are at the other end of the scale and you are renting, you will absolutely be left with your last £100,000 to spend.

"It seems to me what she's offering is better, not worse."

Anne Marie Morris
BBC

Social care: Conservative's policy 'creates a lottery'

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

Labour's Ben Bradshaw said: "Let's be clear what the Conservative manifesto proposal is for this so-called dementia tax. It's for anybody with assets or a home worth £100,000 or more if they are unfortunate enough to get dementia or another long-term condition would have to pay the full cost of that over and above the £100,000. That creates a lottery.

"If you munch burgers all your life and drop down dead of a heart attack you don't lose your assets, your children inherit them.

"What we need is a system like the one Labour is proposing for a national care service, like the principles of the NHS, where we all pay in a bit, either through general taxation or a small levy on all of our estates posthumously. That's a much fairer way of doing it.

"It's a really unfair policy that isn't supported by any experts."

Ben Bradshaw
BBC

Social care: Why shouldn't those who own their own home pay for domiciliary care?

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

David Stanbury asked: "Why shouldn't those who own their own homes, which are on average worth £250,000 now, pay for their own domiciliary care? Those who could never afford to buy, and rent instead, have to pay if they have total assets of over £23,000."

Social care
BBC

Brexit: Should there be a second referendum?

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

One issue debated was whether there should be a second referendum when a deal for Brexit has been drawn up. Take a look at what our audience thought.

BBC Spotlight debate audience

Labour manifesto at-a-glance: Key message

A programme providing a "stark choice" at the election - to stop the system being "rigged against" the many and to "build a country where we invest our wealth to give everyone the best chance".

Jeremy Corbyn's foreword says: "Let's build a fairer Britain where no one is held back. A country where everybody is able to get on in life, to have security at work and at home, to be decently paid for the work they do, and to live their lives with the dignity they deserve."

Corbyn
PA

UKIP manifesto at-a-glance: Key message

A "patriotic agenda for defending our country and our way of life".

Paul Nuttall's foreword says: "We are the country's insurance policy, the guard dogs of Brexit. We have fought for Brexit all our political lives and we want to ensure that the people get the kind of Brexit they voted for on 23rd June last year."

Nuttall
AFP

Lib Dem manifesto at-a-glance: Key message

A programme providing voters with an "opportunity to change Britain's future - by changing the opposition" - a choice between "the extreme and divisive Brexit that Theresa May has chosen for Britain" and a Labour Party "that has given up on opposition".

Tim Farron's foreword says: "I want the Liberal Democrats to be the party that holds Theresa May to account over spending on the National Health Service; our young people's education, skills and opportunities; the protection of our precious environment; and our future relationship with Europe."

Farron
Getty Images

Brexit: 'Remember the big red bus with £350m on it?'

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

Lib Dem Stephen Gilbert said: "Anybody remember the big red bus with £350m for our NHS on it? Where's that money gone?

"The reality of this is that the country has started on a process. We need to know what is going to happen to migrant labour for our tourism and agricultural industries, we need to develop our infrastructure, what access are we going to get to the single market?

"Let's see what the deal is and have the people end that process."

General election 2017: Find your constituency and candidates

BBC Spotlight

All the candidates standing in the general election on 8 June are listed on the BBC News website.

Some 68 parties and 191 independent candidates contribute to a total of 3,304 people standing for Parliament this year - a decrease of 664 from 2015.

Use the search box or browse our A-Z listings to find your constituency and the candidates who are standing.

Your say on the debate

Twitter

Brexit: 'Things aren't going to go horribly wrong'

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

There is concern from audience member Kevin, who receives care from EU migrant workers, that they won't be able to give him the care he needs

Conservative Anne Marie Morris said: "We will prioritise bringing in and enabling people from the EU to come to meet our caring needs.

"The reason we left the EU, among other things, was because we could not build our economy, we had our hands tied behind our back, we could not enter trade deals with other countries and the 28 countries that comprise the EU could never reach agreement.

"The scaremongering that's been going on, that suddenly things are going to go horribly wrong. We've already seen that they aren't going to go horribly wrong. There are more jobs, there is more trade, there is more manufacturing."

Anne Marie Morris
BBC

What do you think?

Twitter

Have your say on Twitter - use #ge17sw

Brexit: 'There should be a let-out clause if deal isn't what we want'

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

The Green's Jacqi Hodgson said: "There should definitely be a second referendum to look at what the deal is so we really understand, we need to understand whether it's a soft Brexit or a hard Brexit that we're being offered, but there also should be a let-out clause that if we still feel what's being offered isn't good enough, and it's not going to be secure enough for this country in terms of not just the finances but also in terms of human rights, our trading and our environment, there are really some critical things in there.

"There's a huge farming community in this area that we need to be very aware of, that we protect them, because they are going to lose out on subsidies, so maybe we need to look at some things that are very close to the Green's heart, which is how we could give better value to the producers.

"We need to make sure we know what we're talking about when we leave."

Jacqi Hodgson
BBC

Brexit: No deal would be 'catastrophic'

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

Labour's Ben Bradshaw said: "It's difficult to answer the gentleman's question because that assumes we know what the motives were of those people who voted leave and I think some voted leave because of immigration, some voted leave because of sovereignty.

"For me the test is 'will we be poorer?', 'will we have the same good trade that we have at the moment?' and that's the test that I think is for all of us to hold the government's feet to the fire on.

Ben Bradshaw
BBC

"Who in this room or who in the audience at home would buy a house and move into it without ever having seen it? That's essentially what Mrs May is asking us to do. Give her a blank cheque for whatever deal and however bad it is and I just don't think in a democracy we should be prepared to do that.

"If you believe in democracy you have to allow the public to change their mind if their presented with a really, really bad deal.

"And the idea of no deal at all, which is what Mrs May has also floated, would be absolutely catastrophic for our economy.

"In Exeter, 70% of all of our goods go straight to the European Union, if we put tariffs on those exports and tariffs on imports it hits our business, hits our jobs and also puts the prices up for consumers at home."

Reality Check: What does 'hard Brexit' mean for UK?

Reality Check

When Theresa May formally signed a letter triggering the UK's departure from the EU, in March, the prime minister fired the starting gun on a two-year negotiation process that will have far-reaching implications for British businesses.

Mrs May's claim that "no deal is better than a bad deal" has raised concerns among UK companies that a so-called "hard Brexit" could have a detrimental impact on jobs and investment in the country.

Meanwhile, Labour has said that it will scrap Mrs May's Brexit plan - outlined in a White Paper in February - which envisages leaving the single market and customs union.

.
AFP/Getty Images

Lib Dem leader Tim Farron has said "people not politicians" should have the final say over the terms of Brexit.

Earlier in the month Green Party of England and Wales MP Caroline Lucas said a second referendum on the details of any Brexit deal should be offered to voters.

UKIP said the party would act as an insurance policy for Brexit ensuring the prime minister does not go back on their word.

Brexit: 'The deal will be what the deal is'

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

Steve Crowther
BBC

UKIP's Steve Crowther said: "Clearly we've got to leave, we've got to leave with a deal, or an agreement not to have an agreement.

"We're going into negotiations, we've got to negotiate very hard because we're going to be negotiated at very hard and we have to then come out and take our place in the world with a positive outlook and a positive future and a strong trading relationship.

"The deal will be what the deal is. It's not a disaster for us to just be like other nations in the world."

Brexit: What key gains need to be won?

Sian Davies

BBC News Online

Up next, Michael Szabo asked: "When the Brexit negotiations occur, what key gains must be won back to prove to the British people that they will receive the Brexit that they voted for last year?"

Michael Szabo
BBC