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Summary

  1. Updates for Wednesday 11 March 2015
  2. More news, sport, travel and weather from 08:00 on Thursday

Live Reporting

All times stated are UK

Get involved

Good evening

Local Live has finished for the day. Join us for more news, sport, travel and weather updates from 08:00 on Thursday.

Tonight's forecast

BBC Weather

Latest

Any remaining patchy rain will soon ease away, with skies clearing.

It will turn cold for most with a local frost likely, particularly across northern parts. However, cloud and milder air will return across southern areas later in the night.

Lows of 5C (41F).

Crash warning

BBC Travel

BBC Travel

The A483 Wrexham Road, near Chester, is partially blocked and there is slow traffic at the Posthouse roundabout

because of a crash.

Congestion is back to the B5445 Wrexham Road junction, drivers are warned.

Feedback

Alex Homer

BBC Local Live

What do you think of BBC Local Live? We'd like

your feedback about this service.

What's expected tomorrow

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

David Duckenfield will be questioned tomorrow by solicitors representing the families of those who died at Hillsborough.

Round-up of today's evidence

  • Matchday commander David Duckenfield admits lying to then FA chief executive Graham Kelly, saying fans got in themselves through gate C, when he ordered its opening
  • He tells the court he did not know that by 14:30 there were still 5,700 fans to get in through turnstiles A-G
  • The former chief superintendent says he should have considered delaying the kick-off, but was concerned about fans' reaction
  • Inquests told he accepts it was a mistake not to take steps to close the tunnel at the Leppings Lane end
  • Mr Duckenfield says his mind was a "complete blank" over a period of two hours between giving his police briefing and entering the control box

Fans waiting for long time

Danny Savage

North of England Correspondent, BBC News

It's been probably quite a difficult afternoon for David Duckenfield, but I'm sure the fans and the people listening in court have been hanging on for this for quite a long time.

Analysis of a frank admission

Danny Savage

North of England Correspondent, BBC News

Mr Duckenfield has admitted over the course of his evidence he didn't have the experience to deal with a big event like this.

He says perhaps he thought that being given the promotion to chief superintendent then surrounding himself with people that did know what they were doing, that everything would be fine.

As we all know, it certainly wasn't.

'It was a grave mistake'

BBC News has the full story of the Hillsborough match commander's admission he

lied about fans forcing an exit gate open to enter the ground.

David Duckenfield
Reuters

Families of the 96 supporters who died gasped as David Duckenfield told the inquests: "It was a grave mistake and I apologise profusely."

End of the day's evidence

The hearing has now finished for the day. The Hillsborough inquests will resume at 10:00 tomorrow.

'Not good enough'

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

"I did my best and if it wasn't good enough I apologise reservedly," said Mr Duckenfield.

Christina Lambert QC, asking questions for the coroner, said: "Was it good enough?"

He replied: "No Ma'am."

Matchday commander's lie

Danny Savage

North of England Correspondent, BBC News

Former Ch Supt David Duckenfield said he told then Chief Executive of the FA Graham Kelly on the afternoon of the disaster that the fans had "got in through a gate".

He has admitted he lied by failing to say that in fact it was he himself who had given the order for the gate to be opened.

Danny Savage reports from outside court
BBC

He said: "I said something rather hurriedly without considering the position and without thinking of the consequences and the trauma, the heartache and the distress that the inference would have caused to those people who were already in a deep state of shock, who were distressed. I apologise unreservedly to the families."

News on the hour

Megan Key

BBC Radio Merseyside

In the 16:00 bulletin: A former senior police officer has apologised to families of the Hillsborough victims, after admitting he lied to an FA official about how fans got into the stadium.

Breaking'Everybody knew the truth'

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

Mr Duckenfield says: "It was a terrible lie in that everybody knew the truth. The fans and police knew the truth that we'd opened the gates."

David Duckenfield says he will regret the lie to his dying day. He says he has no idea what motivated him.

BREAKING NEWS

The lie David Duckenfield just admitted was that he told Graham Kelly, of the FA, that fans had got in themselves through gate C.

There were gasps in the courtroom from the families of those who died at Hillsborough when Mr Duckenfield admitted his lie and apologised.

Duckenfield admits lying to FA

Ben Schofield

BBC Radio Merseyside reporter

Mr Duckenfield has admitted that he told a "lie" to Graham Kelly from the FA.

He said he was "probably deeply ashamed, embarrassed and greatly distressed" when he told the lie.

'Tense electrical atmosphere'

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

It was "difficult to judge" at what point he realised it was not a public order issue but a major disaster, said Mr Duckenfield.

He said: "I went into overdrive. I think I changed from being the moderate individual. It was a very tense electrical atmosphere.

"It could be argued, I accept, that I was slow to react, but I don't think so."

Duckenfield: 'I wanted manpower'

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

Mr Duckenfield said his deputy, Supt Bernard Murray, said "we don't want an ambulance we want a fleet of ambulances".

The matchday commander called for operational back-up support at 3.07pm. He said "in the tension of the control box I decided I wanted manpower".

Sudden realisation

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

After the opening of gate C, Mr Duckenfield said he thought there may have been crowd disorder. Asked if he though it was a pitch invasion, he said "I wasn't sure".

Former Ch Supt David Duckenfield arrives at court
BBC

"There was a man who either collapsed or fell down... then there was a sudden realisation that this was a serious situation."

Surge of fans

The inquest has heard that during the five minutes that Exit Gate C was open, 600-800 supporters went down a central tunnel into the overcrowded Pen Three.

News on the hour

Phil Cooper

Reporter, BBC Radio Merseyside

The match commander on the day of the Hillsborough disaster has "apologised profusely" for the "serious mistake" he made after fans came into the stadium through an exit gate.

Former Ch Supt David Duckenfield told the jury he was left with no option whatsoever but to open Exit Gate C, after one of his colleagues warned him somebody would be killed in the crush outside the turnstiles.

'Mistake' not to close tunnel

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

Christina Lambert QC, questioning the coroner, had earlier asked if it was "a mistake" not to take steps to close the tunnel (pictured) at the Leppings Lane end.

Tunnel at the Leppings Lane end
Hillsborough inquests

He said: "I accept that."

'Biggest life regret'

Ben Schofield

BBC Radio Merseyside reporter

It was "one of the biggest regrets of his life" that he did not consider the consequences of opening gate C, Mr Duckenfield told the inquests.

He said he was "overcome by the enormity of the situation" and the decision to open gate C.

During the five minutes Gate C was open, Mr Duckenfield said he did not consider where the hundreds of fans coming through would go.

'Shocked' by request

Ben Schofield

BBC Radio Merseyside reporter

Mr Duckenfield said he was "shocked" and "taken aback" to hear another request to open the gates at Leppings Lane and he was thinking where are they going to go?

Hillsborough inquests resume

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

The hearing has resumed.

David Duckenfield is now talking about the moment when he ordered Gate C to be opened. He says his deputy told him to, or people would get killed.

He says: "It's difficult to envisage in this quiet courtroom, but on that afternoon when you make a decision of that nature... I'm at a loss to describe it other than to say it's a momentous decision and your mind is such that you don't think of the next step."

News on the hour

BBC Radio Merseyside

In the 14:00 news bulletin: The match commander on the day of the Hillsborough disaster says a colleague told him that fans had burst open an exit gate, and got into the ground.

Approached officer with large knife

More on the police watchdog's findings that the

shooting of a man by officers was proportionate.

The officer who fired the shot told IPCC investigators that as he entered the front room, Elemir Lakatos came towards him with a large knife so he fired once in self defence.

IPCC Commissioner for Merseyside James Dipple-Johnstone, said: "The force used was proportionate and appropriate considering the level of threat posed to the woman and the officers."

Lout took selfie during attack

Liverpool Echo

A thug

took a selfie with a man while he was being attacked in Liverpool city centre before kicking him in the face and breaking his nose.

Matthew Oliver, 27, first rang police after he spotted Alfie Traynor being assaulted by two men in Hanover Street.

But Oliver and several other men then swamped the victim, using their mobile phones to take selfies with the brawling pair as the backdrop.

No smokers outside hospital doors

Emma Stanley

BBC News

Smoking has been

banned on hospital grounds in Merseyside.

New entrance, Broadgreen Hospital
Sue Adair / Geograph UK

In Liverpool about 98,000 adults smoke, an NHS spokesman said. It is hoped the action will deter them.

Broken for lunch

The court has broken for lunch and the Hillsborough inquests will resume just before 14:00.

Have your say

Alex Homer

BBC Local Live

We've introduced BBC Local Live to bring you news, sport, travel and weather updates in one place.

we'd like to know what you think.

News on the hour

Giulia Bould

BBC Radio Merseyside

In the 13:00 bulletin: The match commander on the day of the Hillsborough disaster has accepted it was a mistake not to delay the kick-off.

'Looks worse in close-up'

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

Looking at CCTV of the crowd outside the turnstiles, Mr Duckenfield says "in close-up, the situation looks worse than I believed it was in the control box".

Officers 'lost their focus'

Ben Schofield

BBC Radio Merseyside reporter

Mr Duckenfield said officers in the control box "lost their focus" temporarily while their radios were being fixed.

When he looked up at CCTV screens at 2.40pm to 2.45pm, Mr Duckenfield thought "the situation was out of hand".

Concern over provoking fan trouble

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

David Duckenfield says he did not delay kick-off because he did not want to provoke trouble among fans already inside the ground.

'Regret' over fan numbers

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

Christina Lambert QC, asking questions for the coroner, put it to Mr Duckenfield: "By 2.30pm you ought to have been finding out how many fans had yet to get in?"

He replied: "That's correct ma'am. It's with regret I didn't."

'No problem there'

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

David Duckenfield said he asked his deputy, Supt Bernard Murray, whether they would get all fans inside by 3pm. He said the answer was "yes no problem there".

'Should have delayed kick off'

Judith Moritz

North of England correspondent, BBC News

The inquest evidence has resumed. David Duckenfield tells the court he did not know that by 2.30pm there were still 5,700 fans to get in through turnstiles A-G. If he had have known, he said he would have been concerned.

Had he known the figure, Mr Duckenfield said he would have informed Sheffield Wednesday and the referee and should have considered delaying the kick- off.