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Summary

  1. Live updates of BBC East Midlands general election debate
  2. Nicky Morgan (Conservatives)
  3. Chris Williamson (Labour)
  4. Kat Boettge (Green Party)
  5. Barry Holliday (Liberal Democrats)
  6. Roger Helmer (UKIP)

Live Reporting

By Calum McKenzie

All times stated are UK

Get involved

Our live coverage of the debate

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Thanks for joining us throughout tonight's debate.

You can continue with the discussion on Twitter with #ge17eastmids or on our Facebook page.

You can always find out more about the general election on the BBC's politics page online.

Your comments: East Midlands general election debate

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The debate has got you talking over on Facebook.

John Bullock writes: "Very interesting debate. Well done."

But Tracey Evans adds: "To many lies. No one is to be trusted. Gone to bed."

Who won?

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

BBC East Midlands Today election reporter tweets...

View more on twitter

Watch: 'Brexit will make running a business simpler'

East Midlands Today

UKIP's Roger Helmer says ditching EU regulations as part of Brexit will be good for businesses...

Watch: 'This could make East Midlands great again'

East Midlands Today

Kat Boettge says that a "green economy" would create one million jobs...

...although has she borrowed a turn of phrase from Donald Trump?

'Is the East Midlands falling behind?'

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Question four to the panel is: "In terms of prosperity in the East Midlands - are we falling behind the Northern Powerhouse and do we need a Midlands Mayor?"

Panellists
BBC

Here is a summary of the answers:

  • The Liberal Democrats' Barry Holliday said the East Midlands is "lagging behind," but that a regional mayor was not the answer because the money attached could not be spent how you wanted.
  • Nicky Morgan for the Conservatives pointed to the Midlands Engine as a way of challenging the Northern Powerhouse and enterprise zones in Leicester and Loughborough as a way of growing the economy.
  • Labour's Chris Williamson said "we need to do a hell of a lot more" to improve the region's economy, believing that fiscal devolution for the region would be helpful.
  • Kat Boettge said the Green Party would advocated the sustainable energy industry and that would in turn create jobs and infastructure to help the economy.
  • Roger Helmer for UKIP said Brexit would cut EU bureaucracy that was hindering businesses in the East Midlands.

Your comments: East Midlands general election debate

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

View more on twitter

...use #ge17eastmids to get involved on Twitter

Watch: 'NHS not intended to replace police cells for drunks'

East Midlands Today

A 93-year-old audience member shares his views about why the NHS is coming under increasing pressure...

Lib Dems would remove the 1% public sector wage rise freeze

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Barry Holliday, the Liberal Democrat on the panel, says they will make sure a certain amount of all taxation goes towards the NHS.

"We have got a very clear policy, one penny in every pound of income tax for everybody in the country because we all benefit.

"That money would put £24m just into Nottingham city alone."

He adds that they would remove the 1% pay cap for nurses.

NHS 'does cost money,' says Green Party

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Kat Boettge for the Green Party says that the NHS needs funding "properly."

Debate scene
BBC

She says: "If we want a proper public service, we have to pay for it.

"The NHS, we all feel proud of it, but it does cost money

"The Green Party is committed to ending austerity and paying for nurses."

Her answer also pays tribute to nurses in the NHS.

Watch: NHS 'is about political priorities'

BBC One

Labour's Chris Williamson invokes the spirit of Clement Attlee when talking about the NHS...

Watch: Nurse 'has no disposable income anymore'

East Midlands Today

Lisa Clark, the nurse from Nottinghamshire who asked how the parties would solve a crisis in recruiting nurses, reveals the impact of of the recent 1% pay rise for public sector workers on her life...

Tories' Morgan defends party's record on the NHS

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Nicky Morgan says that a "strong economy" is crucial to the future of the NHS.

She says: "In terms of supporting the NHS, we've been very clear: £8bn invested over the next five years.

"In terms of the student bursaries, it was putting a cap on a number of young people and others who were able to afford to go and be able to afford to train to be nurses.

She adds that nurses will be prioritised in the Brexit talks and says she appreciates that wage freezes for nurses have been "difficult."

Brexit, scrapping HS2 and cutting foreign aid will help NHS, say UKIP

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Roger Helmer's answer to the question talks about scrapping "vanity projects" like the HS2 railway line in order to pay for more nurses.

Roger Helmer
BBC

He says: "We ought to be training more nurses, just as we ought to be training more doctors."

He adds that leaving the EU will also provide £8bn and money saved on cutting the foreign aid budget would also help provide more nurses.

Third question about nursing recruitment concerns

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

The next question of the night comes from Lisa Clark, a nurse.

A nurse
BBC

She asks: "There is a recruitment crisis in nursing. How would your party ensure there are enough nurses to make sure there is care, given the intended end to student nurse bursaries, wage freezes and reducing immigration?"

Watch: 'We'll support farmers with access to the single market'

BBC One

Barry Holliday makes an offer for the UK's farmers to keep their EU subsidies under the Liberal Democrats...

Farming has other issues as well as EU funding, say Greens

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

On the farming issue, Kat Boettge, says: "My boyfriend is a farmer and I feel quite close to that subject.

"The Green Party wants to offer a second referendum on the negotiated deal, including the option of staying in the EU, that's the first thing.

"Secondly, there are different issues that farmers are facing, supermarkets working like cartels pushing down prices...so we need to tackle certain issues that farmers are having that go beyond the EU."

She adds that it is "ridiculous" to say that there is less bureaucracy by leaving the EU, citing trade with America.

Tories right to maintain farming subsidies, UKIP says

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

UKIP's Roger Helmer begins his answer by talking about how there is no such thing as "no deal" in the Brexit talks as we would be able to trade under World Trade Organisation rules.

Moving onto farming, he says: "A lot of people think the European Union is very generous with farmers, but if you look at the statistics from around the world you find they are only sort of in the middle of the range in terms of the percentage of GDP that goes into farm subsidies.

"I think that the Conservatives are right in maintaining the [farming] payments."

He goes on to say that the farmers he has spoken to are keen to get rid of EU regulations for something "simpler and straightforward."

Watch: Tories 'would safeguard' EU farming payments

BBC One

Former education secretary Nicky Morgan backs Theresa May to get a good Brexit deal for the UK and its farmers...

Tories 'would safeguard farmers' EU payments'

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Nicky Morgan begins her answer with an attack on Jeremy Corbyn's ability to lead Britain's exit from the EU.

She describes the thought of him leading the negotiations as "terrifying".

Pressed to answer the question specifically about farming, she says: "We have already said that we would safeguard the amount paid to farmers for the next few years while the negotiations are continuing.

"She [Theresa May] has been very clear that the farmers are a critical part of getting that [a good EU exit deal] right."

Labour 'fearful for farmers' futures' under Conservative government

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Chris Williamson for Labour has the first bite of the cherry on this question and he talks about wanting to make sure farmers "thrive" post-Brexit.

Chris Williamson and Nicky Morgan
BBC

"We need to make sure the beneficial EU regulations for farmers are retained," he says.

"What I'm very fearful of is a Conservative victory on June 8th and then Britain will be turned into a European deregulated island which will become a play thing for European oligarchs and faceless corporations.

"I really fear for the future of farmers and everyone if we have Theresa May at the helm because she has said she is prepared to walk away with no deal at all."

Second question focuses on agriculture funding post-Brexit

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

The next question of the night comes from John Charles-Jones, a Nottinghamshire farmer.

John Charles-Jones
BBC

He asks: "At the moment, just under 40% of EU money goes to agriculture. What measures would you put in place to safeguard farming and the environment?"

Lib Dems commit to sticking with EU's crime database in terror fight

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Barry Holliday for the Lib Dems offers up a number of solutions, some of which have already been mentioned, as ways of keeping the UK safe.

Barry Holliday
BBC

"It is interesting that Chris [Williamson] said they would reverse the cuts and bring back 10,000 police officers, neglecting the fact that the Tories have cut 20,000 police officers.

"So not really reversing the cuts, merely halving them.

"The Liberal Democrats have committed to spending £300m for community policing that would reverse the cuts.

"We're also committed to staying in our reciprocal deals with the EU's crime database.

"We would increase and keep our foreign aid budget at 0.7% of GDP so we can help people where they need help to reduce radicalisation at source.

He adds that the Lib Dems would give the police the pay rise they deserve, replace the "failed" Prevent strategy and stop arms sales to Saudi Arabia.

Find a way of taking 'terrorists' off the streets, say UKIP

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Roger Helmer's response for UKIP centres around a need to get people who are known to the security services off the streets.

Roger Helmer
BBC

He says: "Kat [Boettge] says we don't want to single out communities. We don't want to single out communities, we want to single out terrorists.

"We reject the suggestion from Labour that the terrorist problem is simply a response to foreign wars because [terrorism] started before the foreign wars and they've taken place in foreign countries that have not been involved in foreign wars.

"The important thing to realise is the security services tell us they have 3,000 people on a watch list and over 20,000 people who have come to their attention.

"We cannot have these people on the streets.

"I was very struck by a report two days ago where a Muslim senior police officer from the Met [Police] actually said we cannot go on with these people on the streets, we've got to find a way of taking them off the streets.

"I have to say that is not my party's policy, but I believe it is an area we need to strongly discuss and look at."

Extra police officers will help counter terror threat, Labour says

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Chris Williamson, Labour's representative on the panel, focuses on reversing cuts to public services including the police.

Chris Williamson
BBC

He says: "First of all, what Labour is committed to doing is restoring the police cuts and putting 10,000 more police officers on the streets.

"[They'd be] neighbourhood police officers so they can gather that local intelligence which is very, very important. An early warning sign if you like.

"The only police force that has the necessary resources in order to deal with counter intelligence is the Metropolitan Police. Other constabularies are struggling to keep up.

"We've got to make sure that we are resourcing the police properly.

"The final thing that I'd say is no more expantionary foreign wars that we've seen, which have been a real problem and have been a real breeding ground for radicalisation, leaving this country under threat."

Investment 'at home and abroad' will keep UK safe from terror, Tories say

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Nicky Morgan for the Conservatives goes next and she talks about what investment is needed to protect the UK from terrorism.

Nicky Morgan
BBC

She says: "Governments are there to keep people safe and that means both investing at home and abroad.

"Of course it means investing in our police and our intelligence services, it means having a proper counter extremism policy...we've talked about in our manifesto having a counter extremism commissioner.

"But it is also about investing in defence overseas and the Conservative Party is committed to spending 2% [of GDP] on defence as required by our membership of Nato."

Greens: UK 'bombing countries' won't make us safer

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Kat Boettge for the Green Party goes first and she tells the audience we need to unite communities and alter the UK's foreign policy to help protect the country from terrorism.

Kat Boettge
BBC

She says: "I think the dreadful terrorist attacks have reminded us that we are still living in a divided country.

"To single out certain communities will only make people feel further excluded...which is going to give further risk to terrorists."

She adds: "We need to help other countries also to achieve peace and that doesn't mean going there and bombing countries...and it doesn't mean selling weapons to Saudi Arabia.

"Last year, the UK was the second biggest seller of weapons to Saudi Arabia.

"That is absolutely unacceptable if we want to live in a caring Britain."

First question about protection from terrorism

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Matthew Williams has the evening's first question.

Matthew Williams
BBC

He asks: "What will parties do to ensure the safety of the public from terror threats both foreign and domestic?"

Meet the panellists

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

You'll be hearing from the five main parties across the next 45 minutes.

East Midlands general election candidates
BBC
  • Former education secretary Nicky Morgan is representing the Conservatives.
  • Chris Williamson, who was an MP in the East Midlands between 2010-15, is the Labour representative.
  • Kat Boettge is the regional organiser for the Green Party.
  • Former teacher and vice-chairman of the Nottingham Liberal Democrats Barry Holliday is their representative.
  • UKIP's Roger Helmer is an East Midlands MEP and his party's spokesperson on energy and industry.

Good evening: Welcome to tonight's general election debate

Calum McKenzie

BBC Local Live

Good evening and a warm welcome to live coverage of the BBC East Midlands general election debate.

If you've been allowed to stay up this late then do get in touch with your comments via Facebook or using the Twitter hashtag #ge17eastmids and I'll share some of the best.