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Summary

  1. The day began in the Commons with questions to the Ministry of Defence team at 14.30 GMT.
  2. MPs passed the remaining stages of the Recall of MPs Bill after accepting three Labour amendments. The bill will now pass to the House of Lords.
  3. Labour MP Gisela Stuart led the day's adjournment debate on traffic control outside schools.
  4. In the House of Lords, Baroness Helic was introduced as a new peer during an introduction ceremony
  5. Peers then questioned ministers on a variety of subjects including Universal Credit and young entrepreneurs in the Commonwealth.
  6. The Lords then debated and approved the Wales Bill at third reading; followed by report-stage scrutiny of the Consumer Rights Bill.
  7. Text can be slow to load on these pages. Please hit refresh (F5) if live text does not appear below.

Live Reporting

By Pippa Simm and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

Goodbye for now

With both chambers done for the day, it's time for us to wrap up our live coverage of Monday in Westminster.

We'll be back at 11.15 GMT tomorrow morning to bring you all the day's events in the House of Commons and House of Lords.

We hope to see you then.

Lords finishes for the day

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers agree to this evening's final amendment to the Consumer Rights Bill which would allow all higher education students receiving public support access to external dispute resolution services.

The amendment aims to allow such students at alternative higher education providers, such as Further Education colleges, access to the Office of the Independent Adjudicator - the official watchdog for higher education.

That brings to an end today's business in the Lords.

Peers will return on Tuesday at 14.30 GMT when the main business will be a debate on the UK's membership of the European Union.

Amendment rejected

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers reject a move to outlaw the double charging of letting agents' fees to property buyers and sellers for the same service by 156 votes to 113, a government majority of 43.

Consumer Rights Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

House of Lords
BBC
Peers are debating the final groupings of amendments being proposed to the Consumer Rights Bill

Commons ends for the day

House of Commons

Parliament

Transport Minister Robert Goodwill says that due to concerns about traffic around schools local authorities are allowed to use CCTV to help the enforcement of parking around schools, and assures Ms Stuart that these powers will remain in the future.

And with that he draws his comments to an end, ending the day's business in the House of Commons. MPs will return tomorrow at 11.30 GMT, with questions to Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt and his ministerial team.

Stay with us though as peers are giving the Consumer Rights Bill report stage scrutiny in the House of Lords.

Government response

House of Commons

Parliament

Transport Minister Robert Goodwill has been tasked with responding to the debate for the government.

Mr Goodwill says there are already many existing schemes aimed at reducing congestion around schools, including walk to school schemes and implementing mandatory "keep clear" areas around schools.

Parental difficulties

House of Commons

Parliament

Recalling a time when she was verbally abused by a parent she had asked to move, Gisela Stuart tells MPs that many parents are not "amenable to reasonable conversations" and calls for police community support officers to be allowed to issue parking tickets around schools to improve the policing of parking.

School parking restrictions

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Gisela Stuart wants restrictions on traffic and parking around schools to be tightened. She tells MPs that many parents driving to schools are endangering students by creating obstructions when they park outside.

Recall Bill clears Commons

House of Commons

Parliament

The Recall of MPs Bill passes it third reading with a unanimous vote by MPs in the chamber, meaning it will now pass to the House of Lords.

MPs now turn their attention to the final business in the House of Commons: an adjournment debate on traffic controls outside schools, led by Labour MP for Birmingham Edgbaston Gisela Stuart.

Business in the House is now expected to conclude around 20.15 GMT.

What is third reading?

House of Commons

Parliament

Third reading is the final review of the contents of the bill and debate is limited to the contents of the bill as it stands.

Third readings tend to be quiet valedictory affairs where the front benches and MPs involved in the drafting of the bill look back at its progress through the House.

Given the controversial nature of this bill, however, expect some parting shots form MPs who feel the bill is a "missed opportunity" to give the public more power over recalling their MPs.

Report stage completed

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs complete report-stage examination of the Recall of MPs Bill without the need for a vote and now turn their attention to the bill's final stage in the Commons, the third reading.

New amendments being debated

House of Commons

Parliament

After all that voting excitement, MPs are now debating a series of amendments aimed at clearing up some of the "awkward" wording - in the eyes of Lib Dem Julian Huppert - in the bill.

Follow-up amendment

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have passed a technical follow-up amendment to the previous Labour amendment - stay with me here - on recalling MPs found guilty of parliamentary expenses abuse, setting out when a recall petition may be triggered if an MP is found guilty.

Under the terms of the amendment, MPs found guilty of abusing their expenses before the Recall of MPs Bill comes into force could still have petitions moved against them once the bill become an Act.

The amendment was passed by 236 votes to 65, a majority of 171.

Amendment passed

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted in favour of an amendment which would mean an MP's conviction for parliamentary expenses abuse would automatically trigger a recall.

Tabled by shadow deputy leader of the house Thomas Docherty, the amendment was agreed to by 281 votes to 2, a majority of 279.

Another Lib Dem amendment rejected

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted to reject Julian Huppert's amendment to include a clause allowing MPs to be recalled if they are found guilty of misconduct in a public office.

This amendment does not require 500 constituents to sign a petition to bring the case before a court.

MPs rejected the proposal by 193 votes to 119, a government majority of 74.

Labour amendment accepted

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted to allow recall to be triggered where an MP is suspended from the House for 10 days (the bill currently specifies 21 days) and only if the suspension is as a result of a report from the Commons Standards Committee.

MPs accepted the Labour-tabled amendment by 204 votes to 125, a majority of 79.

Greg Mulholland MP

tweets: Astonished & disgusted that a majority of MPs voted against a public trigger for #recall in the #RecallBill put forward by @julianhuppert.

Lib Dem amendment rejected

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have emphatically rejected former Deputy Commons Leader David Heath's amendment to allow voters to force a by-election through bringing an MP before an Election Court on charges Misconduct in Public Office if 500 constituents sign a petition.

The House voted against the measure by 271 votes to 64, a government majority of 207.

During the debate several MPs registered concerns over transposing the common law charge of Misconduct in a Public Office - normally heard against other public officials such as police officers - into statute law specifically targeted at MPs.

'Norms and standards'

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg says that Mark Durkan's amendment "fundamentally misunderstands" the current oath taken by MPs.

Subscribing to the current oath is an indication that an MP will behave properly in office and bring about laws that reflect the "norms and standards of the country as they currently exist", he says.

Criticism of Lib Dem amendment

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg says he came into the debate undecided on how to vote and adds that he welcomes the fact there is no whip on today's votes.

He criticises the amendment moved by Julian Huppert, which he says takes the decision away from the electorate by introducing a third party - the courts - in trying to determine what are "fundamentally political" decisions.

This is a "complete negation" of what the bill is trying to achieve, he argues.

'Difficult situation'

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Chris Bryant says that while he supports the amendment moved by Julian Huppert he is concerned about a number of terms included in it.

Bringing common law terms into statute law can lead to a "difficult situation for courts and judges to create decisions around" as it weakens the "steer from government".

Free vote allowed

House of Commons

Parliament

Responding to the Labour-tabled amendments, Greg Clark tells MPs that the government will not be backing the proposals because they could reduce the scope of the Standards Committee to punish MPs who they feel do not deserve to be recalled.

Under the amendment moved by Liberal Democrat Julian Huppert an Election Court finding an MP guilty of 'Misconduct in Public Office' would trigger the recall procedure.

Mr Clarke tells MPs that 'Misconduct in a Public Office' is a common law offence which has not developed in Scotland.

The uncertainty over the exact meaning of misconduct as applied to MPs and the role of election courts in the new process could lead to multiple complications, Mr Clark warns.

He also argues that SDLP MP Mark Durkan's amendments would "overlap" with the existing system of policing MPs' conduct in the House, and are therefore unnecessary.

Despite the government's objections it will the government will be allowing a free vote on these amendments.

Government's position

House of Commons

Parliament

Cabinet Minister Greg Clark
BBC
Cabinet Minister Greg Clark setting out the government's opposition to the amendments

Government response

Cabinet Office Minister Greg Clark is now responding to the debate for the government.

He opens his comments by saying that the government believes the bill, as it stands, "meets fully and faithfully" the commitment made by both coalition partners in their manifestos to allow constituents to kick out misbehaving MPs.

Labour's amendments

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow deputy leader of the House Thomas Docherty sets out Labour's proposed amendments to the bill.

They would allow recall to be triggered where an MP is suspended from the House for 10 days (the bill currently specifies 21 days), only if the suspension is as a result of a report from the Commons Standards Committee.

Currently the Speaker can suspend MPs for longer than that for misbehaviour in the chamber.

A separate amendment would establish a precedent where a conviction for parliamentary expenses abuse would automatically trigger recall.

Thomas Docherty
BBC

'Collective proverbials'

House of Commons

Parliament

Zac Goldsmith calls on MPs to reject the current bill, which he calls an "insult to voters" and a "placebo".

During the last debate MPs voted "against real recall", Mr Goldsmith says, and explains that the reason he has not brought forward any more amendments is because he feels the House is "not ready" for real recall.

He goes on to say that "the establishment's refusal to share power means ultimately it will lose this power".

Reform, he adds, is "inevitable" but he says that the country will have to wait until the House of Commons "grows the collective proverbials to do the right thing".

New pledge proposal

Mark Durkan
BBC
Mark Durkan says the pledge he is proposing will lead to MPs affirming that they will abide by the code of conduct for members of Parliament and the "seven standards of public life" on entering parliament

'No friends'

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Zac Goldsmith, whose rival plan to allow recall referendums if 5% of voters in a constituency sign a "notice of intent to recall" and 20% then sign a "recall petition"

was rejected last month, says the government's bill still has "no friends" in the chamber.

Mr Goldsmith, whose plans would have excluded Parliament's Standards Committee from any role in determining whether errant MPs should face re-election, says that the bill offers recall in "only the narrowest of circumstances" and with the agreement of MPs.

He tells MPs that the bill has been "savagely criticised by every single pressure group."

Call for new pledge

House of Commons

Parliament

SDLP MP Mark Durkan is moving an amendment which proposes to introduce a new pledge for MPs requiring them to uphold the standards of public life with "selflessness, integrity, objectivity, accountability, openness, honesty and leadership" and the

Code of Conduct for Members of Parliament .

It would mean that complaints of a significant breach of that oath by at least 500 constituents would start the recall process.

Mr Durkan says it is important to create "a basis on which MPs are actually subscribing to the possibility of recall from the very beginning" and acknowledging that they are subject to scrutiny from their constituents.

He claims many MPs don't believe the current oath that they are made to swear when they enter the House of Commons, which pledges allegiance to the Crown. Forcing MPs to recite words they do not believe in as their very first act does "nothing to enhance the reputation of the House of Commons", Mr Durkan argues.

The amendment will be debated as part of a larger group.

Power to the judges?

House of Commons

Parliament

Former Conservative Cabinet Minister John Redwood intervenes, alleging that the amendment will run contrary to the bill's intended aim of putting the power of recall in the hands of people, as it would instead put the power of recall in the hands of judges.

Dr Huppert says that the process begins with "500 people" and ends with "15% of the public having to make the final decision".

@ayestotheright

Tony Grew ‏

tweets: Something is afoot. Reckless, Zac and Carswell having an animated chat on the 'Ukip bench' probably #recall bill tactics

Election Court

House of Commons

Parliament

Liberal Democrat MP Julian Huppert says the proposal to allow a petition signed by 500 constituents to bring an MP before an Election Court - in order to kick off the recall process for misbehaving MPs - would be "in addition to" other proposals in the bill.

Under current proposals an MP could be recalled if they are convicted of an offence and get a sentence of 12 months or less, or if the House of Commons authorities suspend them for at least 21 sitting days.

If one of these conditions is met, and 10% of voters in the MP's constituency sign a recall petition, the seat will become vacant and a by-election held.

Amendment mover

House of Commons

Parliament

Julian Huppert
BBC
Julian Huppert is tabling an amendment on behalf of his Liberal Democrat colleague David Heath who is not in the chamber today

Recall of MPs Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

The point of order procedure exhausted, report-stage scrutiny of the Recall of MPs Bill can now get underway.

Report stage is an opportunity to consider further amendments following committee stage - and for new amendments to be proposed.

Lib Dem Julian Huppert kicks off the debate as he moves his party's amendment proposing a system to allow voters to attempt to force a by-election if the Election Court agrees there is a case that their MP has met the criteria for the long standing offence of Misconduct in Public Office.

The controversial part of the proposal is that a petition to bring the issue to the Court would only require 500 signatures - too low in some people's view.

Welsh devolution

House of Lords

Parliament

The Wales Bill is the latest in a series of adjustments to devolution in Wales.

It aims to introduce important new powers to expand the competence of the Assembly into financial matters by devolving stamp duty, land tax and landfill tax.

The bill allows for a referendum on devolving some income tax based on the findings of the independent Holtham Commission and the Silk Commission.

A cross-party group of peers, led by the government's Welsh affairs spokesman Baroness Randerson, has tabled an amendment to allow 16- and 17-year-olds to vote in such a referendum - based on comments from several peers about the number of young people who registered to vote in the Scottish Independence referendum.

Gallant MPs?

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Barry Sheerman seems to have started a mini debate through the point of order procedure on House traditions of naming MPs, in particular what is required for members to be called "gallant".

Points of Order

House of Commons

Parliament

The hour-long question session with defence ministers is over, and attention will turn to examination of the government's Recall of MPs Bill - but not before MPs raise several points of order with the Speaker.

Labour MP Kevin Jones uses the procedure to criticise the Home Office's response to his questions on the number of Libyan service personnel training in the UK who have sought asylum.

Speaker John Bercow notes that it is not a point of order - and suggests that "in the parliamentary sense, he should nag" the government, through parliamentary questions for example.

Lib Dem Julian Huppert follows with his own point of order to call for shadow health secretary Andy Burnham to "correct the record" on comments over Hinchingbrooke Hospital in Cambridgeshire.

The Speaker remarks that there seems to be a running dispute between the two MPs, and says it would be "unseemly for me to intrude" in that argument.

Defeating Islamic State

House of Commons

Parliament

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon stresses that Islamic State can only be defeated in Iraq and Syria.

He says the UK supports US air strikes in Syria and is looking at what more can be done to train "moderate Syrian elements" outside the country itself.

Don't panic!

House of Commons

Parliament

There have been a few Dad's Army references during today's defence questions - first begun by the Labour frontbench.

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon continues the theme, responding to Labour MP Barry Sheerman's criticisms of the government with: "Stupid boy."

Wales Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers now move to the third reading of the Wales Bill.

Unlike third readings in the House of Commons amendments can still be tabled in the Lords - provided that the matter has not already been sufficiently debated and voted upon in previous stages.

The remaining matter outstanding in today's debate is votes at 16 at any referendum on Welsh tax devolution.