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Summary

  1. The day for MPs began at 14.30 GMT with questions to the education team.
  2. Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin outlined £15bn to be spent on road infrastructure in England.
  3. Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt then outlined the government's plans for £2bn of funding for the NHS.
  4. MPs agreed to an emergency debate on the Foreign Affairs Committee being refused visas to visit Hong Kong by the Chinese embassy.
  5. The Commons then overturned several amendments made to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill made in the House of Lords, including on judicial review
  6. Conservative MP Damian Collins led the adjournment debate on the jurisdiction of the Serious Fraud Office, and the 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cup bids.
  7. Peers sat from 14.30 GMT with oral questions the first item of business.
  8. The day's main business was the Modern Slavery Bill which was debated in a committee of the whole House.
  9. The short debate was on the report of the All Party Parliamentary Inquiry into electoral conduct.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

Goodbye

House of Lords

Parliament

And that's the end of business in the House of Lords.

The House will sit again at 14.30 GMT tomorrow when the main business will be the second reading of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill.

End of business in the Commons

House of Commons

Parliament

Business in the House of Commons has now concluded and will return tomorrow at 11.30 GMT, when the main business will be a debate on China's refusal to let the Foreign Affairs Committee visit Hong Kong on a fact-finding mission and the new Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

Stay with us though as the House of Lords continues to give the Modern Slavery Bill committee stage scrutiny.

SFO 'ready to act'

House of Commons

Parliament

Solicitor General Robert Buckland is responding to the debate for the government. He tells MPs that, while rugby is his "first love", he is sympathetic to Mr Collins' concerns.

He says it is not correct to make an assumption that the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) should have the jurisdiction to investigate claims of corruption in Fifa.

However the SFO is conducting its own review into the claims, and "stands ready" to work alongside colleagues around the world, including Switzerland - where Fifa has lodged a criminal complaint against certain individuals involved with the country's attorney general.

'Proceeds of slavery'

House of Lords

Parliament

Over in the Lords, crossbench peer Lord Alton is introducing an amendment which would require the government to establish a modern slavery victims' fund to receive and distribute the proceeds of slavery.

Lord Alton of Liverpool
BBC

External pressure needed

House of Commons

Parliament

Mr Collins alleges that Fifa had set up their internal investigations to fail. Fifa has no legal powers to pursue an investigation and request information from people inside its organisation, let alone those outside of its investigation, Mr Collins tells MPs.

Without the involvement of the Serious Fraud Office and the FBI it will be impossible to know the truth, he says. It is only external pressure that will bring about change in Fifa, he argues.

Concluding his remarks Mr Collins says: "Together we need to act to save football from Fifa."

Damian Collins
BBC
Damian Collins says the world deserves to know the truth about the bidding process for the World Cups in Russia and Qatar

Law change rejected

House of Lords

Parliament

Government spokeswoman Baroness Garden opposes the amendment to criminalise paying for sexual services.

She tells the House that ministers are not convinced that a radical change in the law on prostitution would succeed "in reducing harm to those involved".

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs now turn their attention to today's final business in the House of Commons, the adjournment debate, on a topical subject - the jurisdiction of the Serious Fraud Office and the 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cup bids.

The debate is led by the Conservative former member of the Culture Committee, Damian Collins, who has long taken an interest in the running of football.

Mr Collins says he wants to see Fifa, the governing body of world football, to be subject to the "full force of international law" over allegations of

corruption during the bidding process to stage the World Cups in 2018 and 2022.

Remaining amendments agreed

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs agree to the remaining amendments made to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill. The bill will now pass back the House of Lords where peers will consider MPs' changes.

This is an example of the famous ritual of parliamentary ping-pong, in which legislation re-written by one House is sent to the other, so that the changes can be accepted or rejected.

Peers can attempt to re-instate removed clauses, but given the strength of the vote in House of Commons this is unlikely and some form of compromise is on the cards.

Northern Ireland vote

House of Lords

Parliament

Democratic Unionist peer Lord Browne of Belmont argues that prostitution's "inherent harms and dangers would only be exacerbated" if the trade were decriminalised.

He claims that Sweden, which has criminalised the buying of sex, has a lower incidence of trafficking.

In October, the Northern Ireland Assembly voted overwhelmingly to make paying for sex illegal - although the private member's bill still has legislative hurdles to go through before the law can be changed.

Victims of slavery

House of Lords

Parliament

The measures contained in the Modern Slavery Bill apply to England and Wales.

A Home Office report last week said that between 10,000 and 13,000 people are victims of slavery in the UK, higher than a previous estimate by the National Crime Agency.

According to the report, slaves include people forced into prostitution and imprisoned domestic workers.

In addition to the bill, the government will publish a modern slavery strategy in January 2015.

List of amendments

House of Commons

Parliament

A full list of amendments made in the House of Lords, and the government's position on them, can be found in this note

from the House of Commons.

Sexual grooming

House of Commons

Parliament

After a brief debate at committee stage in the House of Lords, the government also agreed to reduce the threshold for prosecuting someone for child sexual grooming.

At present, the offence occurs where a person has met or communicated with the child "on at least two occasions" and subsequently meets (or travels to meet) the child intending to commit sexual offences.

The amendment would mean the perpetrator would only have had to met or communicated with the child on "one or more" occasions rather than "at least two".

Offence of paying for sex

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative peer Lord McColl's amendment would create an offence of paying for sexual services.

Sexual exploitation is the most prevalent form of exploitation in this country, Lord McColl argues, adding that there is "insufficient deterrence" for those who profit from it.

'Revenge porn' offence

House of Commons

Parliament

During the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill's passage through the House of Lords the government committed to creating a new offence of disclosing private sexual photographs and films with intent to cause distress - known as "revenge porn" - following pressure from Liberal Democrat peer Lord Marks of Henley-on-Thames.

The offence, which will extend to England and Wales, will be triable either way and punishable with a maximum custodial sentence of two years.

Government amendments

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs now turn their attention to a group of government amendments made in the Lords and two Lords amendments accepted by the government.

Slavery Bill debate resumes

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers are resuming debate on the Modern Slavery Bill at committee stage.

Crossbench peer Baroness Young of Hornsey is introducing an amendment which would create a legal liability for the beneficiaries of slavery.

MPs back secure college access

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have backed government proposals to allow girls and boys under the age of 15 to attend secure colleges for young offenders.

Peers had argued that safeguarding plans for the colleges were inadequate, and that there were so few girls in custody they could easily be accommodated in smaller, more appropriate secure children's homes.

But the government argued that excluding young boys and girls from the secure colleges would rob them of improved care and services provided at the colleges, which they believe will help cut re-offending rates.

Currently young offenders are sent to either a secure training centre or a young offenders institution, depending on their age and offences, where they spend an average of 12 hours a week in education while in detention - but the new colleges would double that.

MPs approved the reintroduction by 316 votes to 194, a government majority of 122.

Inquiry recommendations

House of Lords

Parliament

The all-party inquiry into electoral conduct took evidence from a wide variety of sources, including every Westminster party except Respect.

As well as finding instances of racist and homophobic campaigning by candidates for major parties, its report highlighted the issue of arms-length and unaffiliated groups engaging in discriminatory campaigning.

The report's recommendations include an agreed mechanism for reporting discrimination and a call for political parties to improve their anti-discrimination training.

It also suggested a code of conduct for advertising during campaigns.

Secure colleges

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs now turn their attention to Lords amendment 74, which would exclude all girls, and boys aged under 15, from the government's

proposed secure colleges.

The government opposes this amendment as, it says, it will deny girls and young boys access to secure colleges.

Justice Minister Andrew Selous argues that the colleges are the best way to ensure that young people are able to gain the skills and self-discipline they need to "build productive law-abiding lives".

Under the government's plans, girls and boys aged under 15 will not be introduced when secure colleges are first opened, in order to allow for the introduction of provisions to ensure their safety.

Electoral conduct debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers are taking a break from consideration of the Modern Slavery Bill to take part in a short debate on the report of an all-party inquiry into electoral conduct.

The inquiry examined discrimination in elections and found instances of racist and homophobic campaigning by candidates for major parties.

Liberal Democrat peer Lord Alderdice, who was a member of the inquiry team, is leading the debate.

He says the inquiry heard "disturbing stories of racism" from MPs, parliamentary candidates and others.

Judicial review plans backed

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted to back the government's plans on judicial review, which survive relatively unchanged, with minor concessions on whether judges have discretion to charge organisations intervening in cases.

MPs back the plans by 314 votes to 198, a government majority of 116.

Domestic worker abuse

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Hylton says he is concerned about the exploitation and abuse of foreign domestic workers in the UK.

"I fail to see how this bill actually increases any protection," he tell the House.

He adds that he would welcome a further meeting with ministers on the subject, in which case he would withdraw the amendment.

Speaking for the government, Baroness Garden agrees to further discussions.

Lord Hylton
BBC

Employment rights

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbench peer Lord Hylton has tabled an amendment that would make it an offence "to deny access to an employment tribunal to a person entering the United Kingdom on a visa restricting the person to a single employer".

Government spokeswoman Baroness Garden argues that access to the protection of employment rights is "generally available" to those working in the UK and the amendment is not necessary.

Legal costs changes reinstated

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted to reinstate a presumption that third parties intervening in a judicial review will pay their own costs and any costs incurred by any other party because of the intervention, unless there are exceptional circumstances.

By convention, third parties in other legal proceedings generally bear their own costs, but do not bear other costs or benefit from costs awards, but the government says this reform will ensure that those who choose to become involved in litigation have a "more proportionate financial interest in the outcome".

This overturns an amendment made by the House of Lords that gave the High Court and the Court of Appeal power to require those who intervene to pay the costs of the other parties to the judicial review and vice versa - to require the other parties to the judicial review to pay any costs of the intervener.

MPs backed government plans by 312 votes to 200, a government majority of 112.

Government defeat reversed

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted to reinstate a ban on judicial review applications that do not provide information about the financing of the judicial review, overturning a second Lords amendment which would have given the High Court the discretion to allow an application for judicial review to go ahead even though the claimant had not provided such information.

The government's reforms are aimed at preventing claimants from hiding how they are funding judicial review applications in order to limit their cost exposure and stopping courts from making them liable for the defendant's costs if they lose.

The government claims that such judicial review applications are often funded by an anonymous backer or companies created for the purpose, who do not want to pay for the costs they are liable for.

MPs backed the government's plans by 315 votes to 203, a government majority of 112.

MPs vote on peers' amendments

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs vote to overturn a series of House of Lords amendments to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill which aimed to ensure that judges kept their discretion over many aspects of judicial review applications.

Former Conservative cabinet minister John Selwyn-Gummer (now Lord Deben), and the former Tory chancellor Lord Howe both voted to reinstate the measures in the House of Lords along with 17 Liberal Democrat peers, including former party leader Lord Steel and Baroness Williams.

Earlier Mr Grayling told MPs that there was a need to end unnecessary delays and curb the activities of campaigners who use judicial review to frustrate government initiatives.

MPs overturned the Lords amendments by 319 votes to 203, a government majority of 116.

Trafficking offence

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers are considering a group of amendments to the Modern Slavery Bill, including a Labour amendment defining the offence of human trafficking.

Under the amendment human trafficking will have been committed if a person "recruits, transports, transfers, harbours or receives another person including by exchange or transfer of control over that other person".

Rise in Judicial Review cases?

House of Commons

Parliament

The use of judicial review has increased more than threefold in recent years from around 4,240 in 2000 to around 15,600 in 2013.

However, that increase has been predominantly in immigration and asylum cases where it has been used as a pragmatic means of appealing decisions.

The rise in other judicial reviews over the period has been far more modest. Civil judicial reviews have increased from 1,730 in 2000 to 2,190 in 2013.

According to the

BBC's legal correspondent Clive Coleman the government wins the overwhelming majority of these cases, in part because few individuals or pressure groups have the streamlined legal resources of central or local government.

However Justice Secretary Chris Grayling has himself been successfully judicially reviewed twice in recent months over his legal aid reforms - one of which affected the legal costs recoverable by those suffering from the asbestos-related cancer mesothelioma.

Slavery debate resumes

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers return to the Modern Slavery Bill in committee.

Debate resumes with consideration of government amendments aimed at protecting child victims of trafficking.

Alternative amendment

House of Commons

Parliament

Justice Secretary Chris Grayling tables an alternative amendment to the one received from the House of Lords, in an effort to appease MPs.

In October, peers voted to restore judicial discretion to several elements of the reforms, including ensuring that judges retain discretion over several elements of Mr Grayling's plans to curtail judicial review.

The government is attempting to reverse most of those changes but has conceded on a clause about whether judges have discretion to charge organisations intervening in cases. Tabling his amendment, Mr Grayling tells MPs that none of the government's reforms will prevent citizens from applying for judicial review.

Judicial review is currently being used as a campaigning tool by pressure groups to bring attention or delay government proposals for financial reasons, and the time has come to "set some limits" to its uses, he adds.

NHS reorganisation

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem peer Lord Willis of Knaresborough cautions against further NHS reorganisation, describing Labour plans to repeal the coalition's Health and Social Care Act as "worrying".

Liberal Democrats may have had some disagreements with the act, he says, but adds: "The last thing the health service wants is another reorganisation".

Labour response

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Baroness Wheeler is responding to the NHS statement in the Lords.

She claims that some of the £2bn funding has already been allocated, with "£700m recycled".

Criminal Justice Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs now turn to the Consideration of Lords amendments to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill.

The government suffered three major defeats in the Lords over plans to curtail the use of judicial review.

One amendment was won by 66 votes, which may incline peers to stick to their guns on that particular point if MPs reverse their decision.

The Commons response to this is hugely significant, given the widespread outrage at the proposed changes from lawyers and campaign groups alike.

House of Commons

Parliament

Speaker John Bercow says he agrees this is an important subject, "not comparable" with anything he's seen in his 17 years as an MP.

MPs unanimously agree to a debate on the subject, and Mr Becrow announces it will be the first item of public business tomorrow and will last for up to three hours.

House of Commons

Parliament

Applications for emergency debates are made under Standing Order 24.

Under Standing Order 24, an MP has three minutes to make the case for an emergency debate.

If the Speaker grants the request, the emergency debate will take place within 24 hours.

MPs demonstrate their support for an emergency debate by standing up in the chamber.

Hong Kong visit refused

House of Commons

Parliament

The chairman of the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee, Sir Richard Ottaway, is requesting an emergency debate on China's refusal to let MPs visit Hong Kong on a fact-finding mission.

MPs on the committee were planning to visit Hong Kong as part of an inquiry into Hong Kong-UK relations, but the Chinese Government has accused the committee of interfering in China's internal affairs.

A Downing Street spokesman described China's decision as mistaken and counter-productive.

Hong Kong has seen protests against a new law limiting the choice of candidates in its 2017 elections.

'Political football'

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Andrew Bridgen says the "outrageous comments of the leader of the opposition" show that Labour are happy to see the NHS used as a "political football".

Mr Hunt says that the public are confused by Labour not welcoming investment that will mean more doctors and nurses on the frontline and not recognising the "fundamental point" that there needs to be a culture of safety and compassionate care backing NHS workers.

'Full fiscal autonomy'

House of Commons

Parliament

SNP MP Angus MacNeil says today's announcement has only come about due to the needs of NHS England.

If there had been acute need in Scotland or Wales "we could have whistled for it", he claims.

This is why there needs to be full fiscal autonomy for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, he adds.

Sidestepping the question, Mr Hunt says the benefit of devolving NHS services to Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales means services can be compared. Patients in England wait shorter times for operations, he adds.

Lords NHS statement

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have taken a break in their consideration of the Modern Slavery Bill while Health Minister Earl Howe repeats a statement on the the future of the NHS, which Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt delivered to the Commons earlier.

On Sunday, Chancellor George Osborne

announced £2bn of funding for the NHS.

'Dark history'

House of Lords

Parliament

Home Office Minister Lord Bates says his fellow Conservative peer Lord James has done the House a service by drawing attention to the country's "dark history" over its treatment of children.

Lord James called for assurances that the Modern Slavery Bill would prevent anyone sending unaccompanied children overseas again.

Lord Bates says he can give that assurance.

Lord Bates
BBC