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Summary

  1. The Commons began at 14.30 GMT with questions to the Communities and Local Government ministerial team.
  2. There were two urgent questions: on the role of UK forces in Iraq and on the talks in Northern Ireland.
  3. There was a debate on a motion relating to the Firefighters' Pension Scheme and then discussion of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.
  4. The adjournment debate was on housing development in north Somerset.
  5. Peers also sat at 14.30 GMT and after the introduction of a new peer, they turned their attention to oral questions.
  6. The main business of the day was the Social Action, Responsibility and Heroism Bill at report stage.
  7. There was also a short debate on the report of the European Union Committee on the Role of National Parliaments in the EU.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Eleanor Gruffydd-Jones

All times stated are UK

Good night from the Commons

House of Commons

Parliament

And that's the end of business in the House of Commons for today.

Join us tomorrow from 11.30 GMT for debates including further consideration of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

Fox attacks housing plans

House of Commons

Parliament

Liam Fox tells MPs that proposals for more housing in Somerset would encroach on flood zones and threaten areas of outstanding natural beauty.

He calls for building to be focused on brownfield sites.

Liam Fox
BBC

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

That's the end of the second day of detailed scrutiny of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill. MPs will return to the bill tomorrow.

Tonight's final business is the adjournment debate.

Conservative MP Liam Fox is speaking about housing development in North Somerset.

'Excessive power'

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP David Winnick claims that, if the home secretary is to have the ability to order the seizure of passports, "excessive powers are being given without any form of legal redress".

Theresa May tells him that the process will be subject to judicial review.

'Don't go to Syria'

House of Commons

Parliament

Summing up for the government in the debate on temporary exclusion orders, Theresa May urges anyone considering travelling to Syria for idealistic or ideological reasons not to go to the country.

"There are better ways of helping the people of Syria than actually going out there" and possibly losing your life, she says.

'Targeted action'

House of Commons

Parliament

Green Party MP Caroline Lucas argues that it is better to have terror suspects in the UK where they can be monitored, rather than excluding them from the country.

"Surely we want suspected terrorists close at hand so we can take targeted action against them," she says.

Goodnight from the Lords

House of Lords

Parliament

The House of Lords has finished for the day.

Peers return tomorrow for questions to ministers and debates including consideration of the Taxation of Pensions Bill.

'Level of secrecy'

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP and former shadow home secretary David Davis says he is concerned about the power to impose temporary exclusion orders resting with the home secretary.

He says there is a risk of "a level of secrecy" and "a low level of accountability".

David Davis
BBC

Temporary exclusion orders

House of Commons

Parliament

Home Secretary Theresa May is opening a debate on temporary exclusion orders.

This part of the bill would give ministers the power to disrupt and control the return to the UK of a British citizen reasonably suspected of involvement in terrorist activity abroad.

She insists that "no one will be made stateless" under the proposal, with UK citizens allowed to return "on our terms, and that could quite possibly be in the company of a police officer".

Theresa May
BBC

Second defeat for Labour

House of Commons

Parliament

The Labour amendment is defeated by 79 votes, with 222 MPs in favour and 301 against.

'Sunset clause' defeated

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's "sunset clause" amendment is defeated by 301 votes to 220 - a government majority of 81.

MPs are now voting on another Labour amendment, which would allow a person who has had their travel document removed to appeal against the decision in the courts.

EU debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Over in the House of Lords, peers are taking part in their final debate of the day, on the role of national parliaments in the European Union.

Division called

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are voting on a Labour amendment to require powers to seize and retain suspects' passports to be reviewed after two years.

'Lack of intent'

House of Commons

Parliament

Opposing Labour's proposed sunset clause, James Brokenshire argues that it would "send an inadvertent message to would-be jihadists about our lack of intent".

'Effective' measure

House of Commons

Parliament

Home Office Minister James Brokenshire says that border authorities would have the power to seize a passport or travel document and retain it for up to 14 days.

He argues it is an "effective way to disrupt terrorist activity".

Passport seizures

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are debating amendments relating to clause 1 of the Counter-Terrorism Bill, which would allow for the seizure of passports from people suspected of involvement in terrorism.

Labour has proposed that a "sunset clause" be put on the powers, requiring a vote in Parliament to allow them to continue beyond December 2016.

Meanwhile, Green Party MP Caroline Lucas has proposed amendments to remove the powers from the bill entirely.

Counter-Terrorism Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are now giving the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill detailed consideration, in the second day of committee stage.

Opening the debate, shadow Home Office minister David Hanson expresses his condolences "for those who have died" in the

Sydney siege.

Labour defeated

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's motion is defeated by 313 votes to 262 - a government majority of 52.

Commons division

House of Commons

Parliament

The Commons divides to vote on a Labour motion to revoke changes made to firefighters' pensions.

MP's doubt

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Peter Bone says he is unsure "which way to vote" on the firefighter's pension regulations.

"Firefighters are genuinely worried" about losing pension benefits after the age of 55, he says.

Peter Bone
BBC

Closing question

House of Commons

Parliament

Home Affairs Committee chair Keith Vaz asks the home secretary about her appearance on the BBC programme Desert Island Discs: and asks what she would like her legacy to be.

She replies that she would like to see the Home Office as no longer the story - but says she has some way to go to achieve that ambition.

FBU claims

House of Commons

Parliament

Officials from the Fire Brigades Union have said that under the government's proposals, firefighters will have to work until they are 60 instead of 55, pay more into their pensions and get less in retirement.

The proposals will leave firefighters at risk of dismissal as their fitness declines into their 50s, the FBU said.

The union has

held a series of strikes during the dispute.

Last month, Penny Mordaunt said strike action was "unnecessary" as nearly three quarters of firefighters will see no change in their pension age in 2015.

Government 'divided'

House of Commons

Parliament

Communities minister Penny Mordaunt says it is "vital" that the pension regulations stand.

But Labour MP Kate Hoey claims the government is "divided" and urges Conservative MPs to rebel against their party whips.

"Someone, somewhere stopped the negotiations continuing," she claims.

Home Affairs Committee continues

House of Commons

Parliament

Statistics released on 27 November showed that net migration to the UK rose to 260,000 in the year to June, an increase of 78,000 in net immigration on the previous year.

Net migration is now 16,000 higher than it was when the coalition government was formed in 2010.

David Cameron has said he hoped to get net migration below 100,000 before the election in 2015.

@timloughton

Tory MP Tim Loughton tweets: Home Secretary currently in front of HA Select Comm gives strong indication child abuse inquiry will need statutory powers as I called for

'Blown off course'

House of Commons

Parliament

The committee moves onto the topic of immigration. Mrs May admits that the Home Office has been "blown off course" in failing to reach immigration targets.

Broad search

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Yasmin Qureshi appeals to Mrs May to "look outside the traditional box" in the search for a new chair in order to find someone "victims have utmost confidence in".

The home secretary acknowledges that the search will be broad, and will consider candidates from overseas.

‏@BBCNormanS

Norman Smith

BBC Assistant Political Editor

130 (!) people have applied to chair the child sex abuse inquiry following departure of Fiona Woolf and Lady Butler-Sloss

Previous chairs

House of Commons

Parliament

Former chair Fiona Woolf resigned in November saying that the victims involved had no confidence in her as she faced pressure over her link to former home secretary Lord Brittain, who handled the abuse claims in the 1980s.

Mrs Woolf disclosed that she was socially acquainted with Lord Brittain but that he was not a "close associate". Lord Britain denies any wrongdoing in the handling of a "dossier" on alleged paedophiles.

Her predecessor, Baroness Butler-Sloss, stood down because her brother was attorney general during the 1980s.

'Order!'

House of Commons

Parliament

"Members must not waste time by jeering and laughing!" the deputy speaker says.

Eleanor Laing
BBC

Approval needed

House of Commons

Parliament

The new candidate will have to be approved by MPs before taking up the role of chairman of the inquiry.

Parties draw battle lines

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow communities secretary Hilary Benn claims the government has based its pensions proposals on a "flawed" standard of firefighters' fitness levels.

Minister Penny Mordaunt claims the new scheme "improves considerably" on a scheme introduced in 2006 by Labour, and says the government has consulted on the plans.

Both frontbenchers' comments provoke noisy reactions from MPs, and Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing intervenes to restore order.

Consulting victims

House of Commons

Parliament

The home secretary outlined plans to consult victims before appointing a new chair for the child abuse inquiry and confirmed the inquiry will continue whilst a new chairman is being sought and appointed.

The inquiry was set up to look at how public institutions handled child sex abuse claims from the 1970s onwards, after claims were made about paedophiles in powerful positions and alleged establishment attempts to cover their actions.

New subject

House of Commons

Parliament

Chairman Keith Vaz MP has moved the committee's attention onto appointing a new chair of the

Independent Panel Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse.

UK reputation

House of Commons

Parliament

Paul Flynn
BBC
Labour MP Paul Flynn raises his concerns that the Feinstein report "degrades our reputation as allies of the United States".

'Why not England?'

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow communities secretary Hilary Benn says Labour recognises that retirement ages may have to rise to fund pensions.

He raises concerns about reduced pensions which could be paid to firefighters who retire early.

He claims that lower reductions are planned in Scotland and Wales, and asks: "Why not in England?"

North Down MP Sylvia Hermon intervenes to say that a satisfactory deal had been reached in Northern Ireland, avoiding industrial action.

'Brutal methods'

House of Commons

Parliament

The US Senate Intelligence Committee recently released its report of

CIA interrogation methods post-9/11, branding their methods them as both brutal and ineffective.

Firefighters' pensions debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Urgent questions are over and the House is now considering a Labour motion to revoke the Firefighters' Pension Scheme (England) Regulations 2014.

Sinn Fein 'deluded'

House of Commons

Parliament

DUP MP Sammy Wilson claims that Sinn Fein are "deluded" in believing that Northern Ireland can be exempt from UK budget cuts.

Theresa Villiers insists there will be no more money for welfare.

Sammy Wilson
BBC