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Summary

  1. The Commons sat from 11.30 GMT, starting the day with Justice questions.
  2. William Hague delivered a statement on proposals for 'English votes for English laws', looking at the implications for England of devolution.
  3. Steve Web announced the contract for Post Office card accounts would be extended for seven years.
  4. Sarah Champion tabled a ten minute rule bill on equal pay; and the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill completed its committee stage.
  5. Peers met at 14.30 GMT and after oral questions, they examined a motion on the Privileges and Conduct Committee report.
  6. The Lords then examined legislation including the Mutuals' Redeemable and Deferred Shares Bill, the Pension Schemes Bill and the Taxation of Pensions Bill.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

Goodbye

House of Commons

Parliament

Helen Grant draws her comments to a close bringing an end to the day in the House of Commons.

MPs will be back at 11.30 GMT tomorrow, when the main business will the weekly joust between David Cameron and Ed Miliband, at Prime Minister's questions.

No specific commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Culture Minister Helen Grant says the government are not hosting a specific commemoration of the bombing of the Hartlepools - instead focusing on the key military milestones of the war.

But she assures MPs that the government is not ignoring the "dreadful things that happened closer to home" and sets out a series of exhibits that will highlight the bombing of coastal towns during the First World War.

People 'behaved like soldiers'

House of Commons

Parliament

Iain Wright says the people of Hartlepool "behaved like soldiers", remaining calm and looking out for one another during the bombing.

Iain Wright
BBC

The bombing of the Hartlepools

House of Commons

Parliament

On 16 December 1914, the German Navy bombarded the town of Hartlepool, which was key for supplying munitions to Britain's war effort, killing 130 people and injuring hundreds more.

Dozens of buildings were destroyed or damaged and many of those hit are still scarred by pieces of shrapnel embedded in the walls.

During a 40-minute raid, more than 1,100 shells rained down on the shipbuilding town.

On the same day, German warships also attacked Scarborough and Whitby in North Yorkshire, bringing civilians unexpectedly to the front line of battle, but Hartlepool was by far the worst hit.

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

We're now onto today's final business: the adjournment debate, led by the Labour MP for Hartlepool, Iain Wright.

It marks the centenary of the

bombardment of the Hartlepools which, Mr Wright says, was the most momentous event in the history of his constituency and changed warfare "forever".

Money resolution passes

House of Commons

Parliament

After a short debate MPs pass unanimously the money resolution for Conservative MP Jake Berry's private member's bill to give public bodies in England the power to include prayers or religious observances as an item of business, should they wish to do so.

The resolution authorises the payment of money under a bill.

Taliban condemned

House of Commons

Parliament

Responding to a point of order, deputy speaker Eleanor Laing condemns the

Taliban's attack on a school in Peshawar in Pakistan which left 141 people dead - 132 of them children.

"We're used to seeing acts of terrorism but rarely have we seen such an act of terrorism against children," she says.

She expresses "horror and sadness at this atrocity" on behalf of the House.

A debate on the subject will be tabled soon, she adds.

Amendment withdrawn

House of Commons

Parliament

Diana Johnson agrees to withdraw her amendments, but indicates she may return to the issue at a later date, and then wishes everyone a "very merry Christmas".

This brings to an end to the committee stage of the Counter Terrorism and Security Bill, which will now move to report stage.

Goodnight from the Lords

House of Lords

Parliament

It's an early exit for peers, as they have raced through their business for today.

They will be back tomorrow from 11.00 GMT for the final time before the Christmas recess, when they will debate the Recall of MPs Bill at second reading.

'Unnecessary' legislation

House of Commons

Parliament

James Brokenshire says it will provide "much needed capacity" to investigate wider areas than one person alone can cover.

Labour's proposals to explicitly set out a new remit for the board is unnecessary as the board exists to support the work of the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, and therefore its remit "is in line with his".

The government will hold a full public consultation on the board including, its compositions, appointment and access to documentation, which he encourages MPs to take part in.

'Counter Terrorism Oversight Panel'

House of Commons

Parliament

Under the Labour amendments the Privacy and Civil Liberties boards would be given a statutory remit to cover the areas David Anderson doesn't already cover, Diana Johnson says, and will be given a legal right to access documents it requires.

The board will not just cover privacy, but also other human rights and counter terrorism policy, she says and would be renamed as the "Counter Terrorism Oversight Panel" she says.

Privacy and Civil Liberties Boards

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow Home Affairs Minister Diana Johnson tables an amendment to find out what the Privacy and Civil Liberties Boards - set up under the bill to support the statutory role of the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation - will do.

Ms Johnson says the bill as formed doesn't "actually tell us very much" and is "quite empty" about what the board will do.

New clauses accepted

House of Commons

Parliament

James Brokenshire warns that "ransoms provide huge revenue streams for terrorists" which can then be used to attack the UK, These amendments will help attack dry up terrorists revenue streams and prevent future kidnappings by making it a less profitable occupation, he adds.

The government amendments are passed unanimously.

Government amendments

House of Commons

Parliament

Home Affairs Minister James Brokenshire tables two government amendments.

The first to creating a new offence for insurance companies who pay ransoms or reimburse payments that they suspect has been made in response to a terrorism-related request.

The second strengthens and clarifies powers to examine goods sent via letters or parcels at ports. This change is based on recommendations from the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation David Anderson, he says.

Pension flexibility

House of Lords

Parliament

The Chancellor also removed the need for someone to use a defined contribution pension to buy an annuity.

The government says that the changes will give people more flexibility and choice about how to use their pension.

Pensions Minister Steve Webb said that the government was "treating people as adults".

Labour greeted the move with caution, arguing that people might end up running out of money in retirement.

More on pension tax changes

House of Lords

Parliament

In this year's Budget, Chancellor George Osborne promised a series of changes to the pension system.

Under existing rules, someone over the age of 55 can take 25% of their pension savings as a tax free lump sum.

The new proposal would mean they could dip into pension pots as they want, with 25% of what they take coming free of tax.

Research suggested that 200,000 people plan to cash out their pensions.

Peers debate tax bills

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers are continuing their second reading debate on the Pensions Schemes Bill.

The Pensions Schemes Bill establishes a new legislative framework for private pensions and applies to England, Wales and Scotland.

Peers are also considering the Taxation of Pensions Bill.

Amendment defeated

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs reject a second amendment, this time tabled by Green Party MP Caroline Lucas, that would have required the government to produce a review into international best practice on deradicalisation, by 296 votes to 217 - a government majority of 81.

Amendment defeated

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs reject the Labour amendment to ensure that guidance for authorities preventing people being drawn into terrorism is approved by both the House of Commons and the House of Lords, by 299 votes to 216 - a government majority of 83.

Division

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow Home Office Minister Diana Johnson does not withdraw her amendment, however, and MPs divide to vote.

Amendment withdrawn

House of Commons

Parliament

After receiving assurances from Mr Brokenshire, Hazel Blears agrees to withdraw her amendments but says she cannot understand the reluctance putting "countering the ideology" on the face of the bill and indicates she may return to the point at a later stage.

Committee adjourns

House of Commons

Parliament

A division in the Commons brings the Liaison Committee to an abrupt end.

The prime minister and his interrogators wish each other a happy Christmas.

Extremism v terrorism

House of Commons

Parliament

James Brokenshire says the government will announce a new strategy on extremism in the spring.

Responding to amendments from Labour MP Hazel Blears, Mr Brokenshire says extremism "goes much wider than terrorism" and includes many behaviours that it "would be inappropriate to deal with" via counter terrorism legislation.

This new strategy will mean radicalism is not seen solely through the "lens of counter terrorism".

Passport seizures

House of Commons

Parliament

Keith Vaz says the extended family of someone suspected of travelling for terrorist purposes had their passports seized - "22 passports from an entire family".

He asks if such situations are likely to arise in the future.

Mr Cameron says he does not know the details of the case, but adds that Home Secretary Theresa May is "meticulous" when it comes to exercising her powers.

MPs debated powers to seize and retain suspects' passports during yesterday's consideration of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

Keith Vaz
BBC

Applause!

House of Lords

Parliament

Clapping in the House of Lords? An unusual burst of applause erupts as Lord Jenkin of Roding finishes his valedictory speech.

Now Lord Freeman, following Lord Jenkin, pays tribute to his long career.

Making 'prevent' law

House of Commons

Parliament

Responding to the debate for the government Home Affairs Minister James Brokenshire tells MPs that terrorism and radicalisation "pose a real threat" to the UK's communities.

Putting the 'prevent' strategy on a statutory footing, which this bill will do, will help combat the radicalisation of UK citizens, he says.

'Extremist narrative'

House of Commons

Parliament

David Cameron says the "extremist narrative" cannot be combated "unless we deal quite aggressively" with the so-called Islamic State (IS).

About #illridewithyou

House of Commons

Parliament

By the time yesterday's siege in a cafe in Sydney ended, thousands of messages of support had been posted online for Muslims in Australia who are afraid of an Islamophobic backlash.

The inspiration was a post on social media by Rachael Jacobs, who said she had seen a woman she presumed was Muslim silently removing her hijab while sitting next to her on the train.

The story of Rachael's encounter with the woman inspired Twitter user Tessa Kum to start a hashtag

IllRideWithYou.

Farewell to the Lords

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Jenkin gets to his feet, to the sound of acclaim from the House, to give a valedictory speech.

His son, Bernard Jenkin, is in the Lords to hear. Mr Jenkin is, of course, a Conservative MP.

Radicalisation

House of Commons

Parliament

The Liaison Committee turns its attention to the subject of radicalisation, with questions from Home Affairs Committee chairman Keith Vaz.

The prime minister says it is difficult to monitor people who are "self-radicalised" through, for example, reading and viewing material online.

Mr Cameron praises the Twitter hashtag #IllRideWithYou, launched in response to fears of a backlash against Muslims in Australia, calling the community response "incredibly powerful".

‏@BaronessEB

Baroness Berridge tweets: In chamber for retirement speech of lord Jenkin - what a lifetime of service to @UKParliament @Torypeers @ConHome

Lord Jenkin's retirement

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Jenkin of Roding is to make a speech this afternoon, announcing his retirement from the House of Lords.

Peers debating the Pension Schemes Bill at second reading are paying tribute to him; currently Lord Hutton is speaking.

'Myths'

House of Commons

Parliament

David Cameron tells the Liaison Committee there are "myths that we need to confront" around certain technologies.

These include, he thinks, "the myth that fracking would be a disaster for the environment, the myth that GM technology means that we're all going to be eating fish-flavoured tomatoes [and] the myth that nuclear power is inherently unstable".

David Cameron
BBC

Labour response

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow home affairs minister Diana Johnson says Labour support strengthening provisions to prevent people from becoming terrorists.

There are some holes in the bill though, she says. There needs to be a much clearer commitment to support the

Prevent agenda, which has largely been delegated to local government and public bodies.

There has also been "marked decline" in funds for Prevent down from £17m a year, to £1m, she says and there needs to be a greater debate about the allocation of funds.

Each year £5.1m is marked for "local delivery", but 60% of that goes unclaimed she says.

Diana Johnson
BBC
Diana Johnson questions to the success of government's 'prevent' agenda.

@SteveTheQuip

Labour's chief whip in the Lords Steve Bassam tweets: #LordsQs went bit barking today on chip'n'pin for Dogs when a Bishop rose to his feet & told peers he was the only licensed Dog-Collar going

'Mitigation or adaptation?'

House of Commons

Parliament

International Development Committee chairman Malcolm Bruce asks the prime minister if he favours "mitigation or adaptation" when confronting climate change.

David Cameron tells the Liberal Democrat MP there is a "balance" to be struck between the two, depending on when and where "the greatest return can be found".

He argues that the poorest states should be prioritised.

Scotland's own way

House of Commons

Parliament

Scottish National Party MP Pete Wishart says some of the "fighting language" in the bill, which wants to "take on" radicalisation, doesn't do much to achieve the objectives of making communities safer and resilient to fight against radicalisation.

He calls on the government to exclude Scotland from the part of the bill which addresses combating extremism, as "Scottish communities" are different and the Scottish government have their own "agenda".

The UK also needs to understand the external stimuli that allows radicalisation to take hold, such as the Iraq War, and the "poisonous debate" about immigration, and should take steps to prevent the feeding of radicalisation.

Fracking 'bribe'?

House of Commons

Parliament

David Cameron denies there is a "tax subsidy" for fracking, following proposals that local communities could share in the revenues.

"There should be a tax regime on this industry that encourages it to get going," the prime minister argues.

Labour MP Joan Walley suggests that the policy could be seen as a "bribe".

But Mr Cameron says it is right that local communities benefit from the revenues from unconventional oil and gas extraction.

What is committee stage?

House of Commons

Parliament

A bill is sent to committee stage after second reading for detailed line by line examination of the text. Bills are normally considered by standing committees of 16 to 50 MPs away form the main chamber.

Bills of "first class constitutional importance" or of "great urgency", such as the Counter-Terrorism Bill, are considered in committees of a whole House, which as the name suggests takes place in the House of Commons chamber during the normal sitting of the House.

The chairman of ways and means - the chief deputy Speaker - and his deputies preside over such committees instead of the Speaker.

Any MP may put down an amendment to a bill which will then be grouped with other amendments to be debated en bloc. Amendments are rarely pushed to a vote at committee stage and are instead used as a chance to raise issues or to gain clarification on a point from ministers.