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Summary

  1. MPs met at 11.30 GMT with questions to Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and questions to the Attorney General.
  2. MPs passed a ten minute rule bill from Conservative MP Sir Alan Duncan on banning email disclaimers.
  3. The government avoided defeat on a series of amendments at report stage of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill but a concession on judicial oversight on TEOs looks likely.
  4. The final item of the day was an adjournment debate on the mobile phone signal in Fownhope.
  5. The House of Lords returned at 14.30 GMT after the Christmas recess, beginning with oral questions.
  6. Peers considered the Social Action, Responsibility and Heroism Bill and the National Insurance Contributions Bill.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

End of business

House of Commons

Parliament

Mr Vaizey draws his remarks to a close, ending the day in the House of Commons.

MPs will be back tomorrow at 11.30 GMT where the main business will be the weekly battle between David Cameron and Ed Miliband at Prime Minister's questions.

Peers will return at 15.00 GMT to debate strengthening powers to exclude members from the House of Lords in the House of Lords (Expulsion and Suspension) Bill.

Searching for solutions

House of Commons

Parliament

Communications minister Ed Vaizey has been given the job of responding to the debate for the government.

He says that multiple solutions to improving rural phone coverage are being looked at, including offering a special tariff to small towns and villages that will allow an "open sure signal" to be established in the area.

Adjournment debates

House of Commons

Parliament

Adjournment debates are held at the end of business each day in the House of Commons and are an opportunity for backbench MPs to raise constituency issues, or other matters relating to government policy, and obtain a response from a government minister.

Adjournment debates are normally time limited to 30 minutes, but when business in the House finishes early - like today - debates can go on for longer.

'Left behind'

House of Commons

Parliament

Mr Wiggin complains that his constituents are being "left behind" in the revolution in smart phone technology by "patchy or non existent" mobile phone reception.

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs now turn to today's final business, the adjournment debate, led by Conservative MP Bill Wiggin on the mobile phone signal in the Fownhope in his North Herefordshire constituency.

The Counter-Terrorism Bill will return tomorrow for its final stage in the House of Commons.

Communications clarifications

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour Home Office Minister Diana Johnson tables an amendment seeking clarification on how online communications and metadata will be recorded and accessed under the bill.

The bill as it currently stands could "create confusion" she argues, and asks for the minister to set out how emails, messages sent over messaging services and tweets will be kept and investigated under new powers.

She also asks if more obscure online connections such as matches on dating services like Tinder be counted as "communications".

Amendment defeated

House of Commons

Parliament

Plans to allow appeals against passport seizures are defeated by 307 votes to 227, a government majority of 80.

What are the passport seizure powers?

House of Commons

Parliament

Under the rules contained in the bill, Police and Border Forces will be allowed to seize a passport and ban an individual from leaving the country for 30 days, while police investigate the individual concerned.

The individual would not be detained during this retention period but will be placed on a "no-fly" list for the duration of the order.

The decision must be reviewed by a magistrate after 14 days but a passport could be take multiple times.

This is a substantial extension of the current rules on detaining and questioning terror suspects, contained in

schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act, which allow a passport to be withheld for six hours.

Appeals for passport seizures

House of Commons

Parliament

David Hanson tables a series of amendment to introduce an appeal mechanism for passport seizure powers - in a court of the government's choosing - which must be heard within seven days.

Mr Hanson argues that without an appeal process keeping powers in check, mistakes will increasingly be made as the passport seizures begin to be used more widely.

Amendment defeated

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's amendment is defeated by 311 votes to 228, a government majority of 83.

Lords move on

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour peer Lord Williams of Elvel is leading a short debate on reducing the number of peers attending the House of Lords each day.

With almost 800 members, the House of Lords is already one of the largest parliamentary chambers in the world, second in size only to the Chinese National People's Congress.

Many peers have called the current situation "appalling" because the chamber is often so overcrowded - there is only enough space for around 230 members.

The House of Lords Act 1999 removed the right of most hereditary peers to sit and vote in the House of Lords. As a result, membership dropped from 1,210 to 690. Since then, however, numbers have steadily crept up again as prime ministers routinely appoint new members.

Tony Blair handed out 374 peerages during his term in office; Gordon Brown awarded 34. Since 2010, David Cameron has made over 160 appointments.

'Inadvertent' message

House of Commons

Parliament

Immigration Minister James Brokenshire argues that putting a sunset clause on these powers would "send an inadvertent message" to terrorists that the UK is not serious about using these powers to disrupt travel and investigate terrorism.

Passport seizures

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow Home Office Minister David Hanson tables a second amendment to put in a sunset clause - an expiry date for legislation - on proposals to allow Police and Border Force officers to seize passports to stop suspected terrorists from travelling.

The expiry date, set for the 31 December 2016, can be overridden by a resolution passed by both Houses if politicians feel the controversial measure is working.

Rejected amendment

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs vote to reject Labour's amendment by 315 votes to 230, a government majority of 85. A sizable majority, yes, but it seems unlikely this will be the last we've heard about judicial oversight.

National Insurance Contributions Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Now peers move onto debating the National Insurance Contributions Bill at report stage.

The bill aims to simplify National Insurance contributions paid by the self-employed.

HM Revenue and Customs will be given new powers to enforce payments in tax avoidance cases.

Targeted anti-avoidance rules will be introduced to determine whether arrangements are designed to avoid or minimise national insurance payments.

Bill passes

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Pannick - one of the most fervent critics of the Social Action Bill - pays tribute to Lord Faulks, who has steered the legislation through the Lords - but calls it a "pitiful creature" of a bill.

To laughter in the Chamber, Lord Pannick withdraws his amendment, after praising Lord Faulks' heroism with a humours riff, comparing him to Mr Darcy.

And the bill passes.

Division procedure

House of Commons

Parliament

Votes typically tend to take about 15 minutes in the House of Commons, as MPs file through the 'Aye' or 'No' lobbies to register their vote.

There must be four 'tellers' who count the votes during a division and then announce the result to the Speaker on the floor of the House.

Division

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour Home Office Minster David Hanson withdraws the amendment but pushes new clause three to a vote - which defines the parameters for court approval that a temporary exclusion order (TEO) would have to meet.

Mr Hanson says he withdrew his amendment as he is certain the government will concede and introduce judicial oversight in the House of Lords, but wants to test the opinion of the House on Labour's approach to TEOs.

A theatrical shout of "division" from Deputy Chair Eleanor Laing rings through the corridors in the House of Commons as MPs file out to vote.

'Look again' at judicial oversight

House of Commons

Parliament

In an effort to appease MPs, Immigration Minister James Brokenshire, responding for the government, promises that the government will "look again" at the suggestions for judicial oversight and return to them when the bill passes through the House of Lords.

However he says he believes it is right for the home secretary, who is responsible for National Security, to make the decision on imposing and order of this kind, rather than the judiciary.

James Brokenshire
BBC
James Brokenshire says the temporary exclusion orders will help keep the UK safe

Threat of rebellion

House of Commons

Parliament

Potential Tory rebel Dominic Raab threatens to vote against the government if the minster does not set out how it will compromise on judicial review in his reply to the debate.

Speaking in support of judicial oversight he tells MPs that he "doesn't buy" the argument that such oversight will make the powers too slow or that it will impact national security.

Social Action Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers are now taking part in a third reading debate on the Social Action, Responsibility and Heroism Bill.

The bill is one of a number of initiatives being pursued by the government to tackle the perception of a "compensation culture" which, among other things, may deter people from volunteering or getting involved in activities of benefit to the community.

People who are sued after intervening in emergencies or acting to protect the safety of others will have new legal defences.

When considering negligence and breach of duty cases, courts will have to consider the "wider context" of defendants' actions, including whether they behaved responsibly and "for the benefit of society" or had taken "heroic action" to help people in danger with no regard to their own safety.

@LibDemLords

Lib Dem Lords tweets: Lord Dykes asks Q on publication of #ChilcotInquiry. Will it be published before purdah for General Election? #LordsQs

Tory MP concern

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP David Davis rises to speak on the bill. He calls the bill a complex mix of measures - and says that like all the bills on counter-terrorism that have preceded it, it gives more power to the executive.

He promises to listen carefully to the minister's response but says he believes judicial oversight will be needed.

Peers return

House of Lords

Parliament

House of Lords
BBC
The Chamber is packed, as peers return for the first session following the Christmas recess

Question session

House of Lords

Parliament

Today's session in the House of Lords is about to begin. Peers will be putting questions to government ministers in their daily question session.

Labour's shadow home affairs spokesperson, Baroness Smith of Basildon, is asking a question about the publication of photographs of children without their consent.

Labour peer Lord Berkley is asking a question on plans to reduce the number of premature deaths caused by nitrogen dioxide and the particles emitted by diesel engines.

Liberal Democrat peer Lord Dykes is asking a question on whether the Chilcot Inquiry report will be published before the pre-election purdah.

And finally, Independent Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Tonge is asking a question on a two state solution for Israel and Palestine.

More conditions for TEOs

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative stalwart Sir Bill Cash become the first speaker to not support judicial review for temporary exclusion orders.

Instead Sir Bill calls for the number of conditions for a person to be excluded to be expanded.

An amendment in Sir Bill's name would allow an exclusion order to be made if an individual had "made a formal declaration of allegiance to another state or seized territory...having given definite evidence of his determination to repudiate his allegiance to the United Kingdom" or if they had "conducted [themselves] in a manner seriously prejudicial to the vital interests of the United Kingdom".

'Principled and pragmatic'

House of Commons

Parliament

Former leader of the Liberal Democrats Sir Menzies Campbell comes out in support of the amendment and calls on the government to accept some form of judicial review.

While he says he is sceptical of the power to exclude British citizens he feels it is "principled" and "pragmatic".

What would the Lib Dems do?

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP David Winnick tries to needle the Liberal Democrats into action, saying that if they were in opposition "there is no doubt" they would be introducing the same amendment or at the very least supporting Labour in this motion.

If they don't decide to support the motion, Mr Winnick predicts it will fall.

@Jo_Coburn

Jo Coburn

BBC political correspondent

Former Att Gen Dominic Grieve tells me he thinks Home Sec will allow courts oversight to deal with terrorist suspects returning home #bbcdp

Help for the home secretary

House of Commons

Parliament

Former attorney general Dominic Grieve says that judicial oversight is not only "the most prudent course" but also beneficial for the home secretary.

Mr Grieve, who was attorney general until July 2014, argues that allowing judicial oversight would add greater "validity" to the decisions, potentially cutting off costly legislation in the future from people who feel they have been treated unfairly.

Judicial commitment

House of Commons

Parliament

David Hanson commits to judicial oversight for difficult decisions that have to be taken by the government that may be "damaging to the UK's interests".

It is "perfectly reasonable to have judicial oversight on these kind of matters", he adds.

Rebel rebel?

House of Commons

Parliament

Potential Conservative rebel Dominic Raab - who said in the

Independent on Sunday he was "sympathetic" to the amendment and would find it difficult to vote against - asks David Hanson whether this amendment is a "one off" political gimmick designed to destabilise the government with a defeat.

Mr Raab is sceptical that Labour, who he says have introduced "draconian legislation" in the past, are fully committed to the principal of judicial oversight for government decisions.

Oversight for exclusion orders

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour kicks off the debate tabling an amendment to give judges oversight of the home secretary's new powers to impose temporary exclusion orders for up to two years on British citizens returning from Iraq or Syria.

The orders, known as TEO's, will exclude recipients from the UK.

Tabling the amendment, the shadow Home Office minster David Hanson says the amendment will ensure they are used fairly and "proportionately" by the government.

The Guardian has a story about today's debate

The Guardian

A fresh coalition row has broken out after Nick Clegg told the Home Secretary, Theresa May, that she will face a parliamentary defeat on the government's counter-terrorism bill unless judges are given oversight of plans to impose temporary exclusion orders on some terrorist suspects returning to Britain.

As MPs prepare to debate the Counter-terrorism and Security Bill at its penultimate Commons stage on Tuesday, the deputy prime minister has told the Home Office that the measure will have to be amended in the House of Lords to avoid a government defeat.

Anti-terrorism bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs now move to the report stage of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill at report stage - MPs' last chance to amend the bill and discuss amendments made to the bill at the committee stage.

Will we get shorter emails?

House of Commons

Parliament

Sir Alan's bill is unanimously passed. But this doesn't mean we can all expect briefer emails from now on, so don't hold your breath.

Very few ten minute rule bills make it into law without government backing and are instead normally used as a high profile way of bringing a subject to public attention.

Banning email disclaimers

House of Commons

Parliament

Sir Alan says the disclaimers, which are found at the end of e-mails instructing recipients on what to do if the email was received in error, are "not worth the paper they are printed on", legally dubious and increase the word count of emails, making them harder to read.

His Bill would introduce a new law abolishing the use of such disclaimers, starting with all UK government departments, agencies and companies.

Ten minute rule bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Sir Alan Duncan is now tabling his ten minute rule bill to abolish email disclaimers "once and for all".

Mark D'Arcy

Parliamentary correspondent

2/2 Speaker made announcement after Point of Order by @AndrewBridgenMP following announcement of no further Police action re Mark Prichard

‏@DArcyTiP

Mark D'Arcy

Parliamentary correspondent

Speaker tells MPs he wants to look at changing the ancient practice of informing Commons on Order Paper when and MP is arrested -1/2