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Summary

  1. David Cameron and Ed Miliband began their exchanges with need to protect UK from terrorism
  2. Ed Miliband then accused the PM of being "frit" of taking part in election TV debates
  3. David Cameron said the Labour leader was "chicken" of being in a debate with the Greens
  4. Home Secretary Theresa May is making a post-PMQs statement on Paris terror attacks
  5. You can watch key clips via the 'Key Video' tab, and watch the entire sessions via the 'Live Coverage' tab

Live Reporting

By Pippa Simm, Aiden James and Alex Hunt

All times stated are UK

Update: Reaction to Prime Minister's Questions

Daily Telegraph: Parliamentary sketchwriter Michael Deacon

observes the "outbreak of avian hysteria" on the Labour benches after Ed Miliband called the PM a "chicken" for refusing to take part in the TV leaders' debates unless the Greens are included. "'Cluck-CLUCK-cluck-CLUCK!'. Almost all of them seemed to be at it. The entire opposition, performing a simultaneous chicken impression."

New Statesman: "Cameron's Green shield protects him from Miliband's TV debates attack,"

writes political editor George Eaton. He says David Cameron's charge that the Labour leader was "running scared" of the Green Party allowed him to "avoid humiliation" at PMQs.

The Guardian: Senior political correspondent Andrew Sparrow

offers his snap verdict of PMQs: "Given that Cameron's stance on the debates is implausible (and the polls seem to back that up), he did rather a good job at resisting Miliband's withering onslaught, and it wasn't quite the walkover Miliband was perhaps expecting."

The Times: A potential solution to the growing row over the TV debates emerged after David Cameron appeared to suggest that he would be prepared to take part in a head-to-head clash with Ed Miliband and a five-way encounter involving the Greens,

writes Philip Webster, political editor of the Times online.

More to come...

Rather in the style of the 5live football commentators welcoming/leaving world service listeners, we're going to say goodbye now. But if you're interested in following the debate about compulsory voting, Labour's plan to be able to enforce lower energy bills and everything else happening in parliament today, please turn over to the BBC's

Democracy Live coverage. We'll also be adding the best clips from today's PM's questions and more reaction/commentators' verdicts later this afternoon.

Charles Kennedy

BBC Radio 4

Charles Kennedy, MP and former Lib Dem leader, shares Douglas Alexander's view on TV debates, saying that the parties should not "insert themselves into the journalistic decision-making process". He adds: "Our is the political decision-making process, and it's like dogs and lampposts - there's a very clear distinction to be had." (We're not too sure whether the politicians are the dog or the lamppost in this analogy)

Statement comes to an end

House of Commons during Theresa May's statement
BBC
There were still plenty of MPs standing up to try and catch the Speaker's eye to put a question to Theresa May after an hour of her statement on the Paris terror attacks

Anti-Semitism

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Bob Blackman says he is concerned that there is a "growing tolerance" of anti-Semitism in the UK. He calls for "zero tolerance of anti-Semitism". Theresa May agrees.

Bullying?

BBC Radio 4

Shadow foreign secretary Douglas Alexander - Labour's election co-ordinator - believes David Cameron's refusal to take part in the TV debates with the Greens is a "calculated attempt" to "bully" the broadcasters or "block" the debates. Asked whether Labour would write to ITV and ask for the Greens to be involved. he says parties should not be "vetoing or advocating" on behalf of political opponents.

'More plurality'

BBC Radio 4

Conservative Treasury Minister Priti Patel tells BBC Radio 4's World at One that politics has changed since the 2010 election, with "more plurality" in the political system before. She says the Greens "naturally feel they have a right to have a voice" in the election debates, and stresses that David Cameron is up for them, but thinks others should be included too.

Manifesto call

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Richard Graham asks the home secretary to confirm that proposals for new powers to intercept communications will be in the Conservatives' manifesto, if the Liberal Democrats will not agree to such measures before the election. Theresa May confirms this. "We are very clear that we will take this legislation forward," she tells him.

BBC political reporter Vicki Young

@VickiYoung

Tweets: Nick Clegg on TV debates says it's about compromise and format is for broadcasters not politicians #tvdebates

No 'clash of civilisations'

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Anas Sarwar says: "This isn't a clash of civilisations, it is a street fight between right and wrong." He says the "true Muslim on that day" was police officer Ahmed Merabet, who lost his life in the attack on the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

Catch-up: Daily Politics and PMQs

Daily Politics
BBC

You can click and scroll through today's Daily Politics, including PM's questions by selecting it from the Live Coverage tab on this page.

Salmond on TV debates

BBC Radio 2

Former SNP leader Alex Salmond - who is running for election to the UK Parliament - has told BBC Radio 2's Paddy O'Connell that the SNP should also have a place on the election debate platform, alongside the Greens.

Picture: Labour front bench

Labour front bench watch Theresa May statement
BBC
Shadow Home Secretary Yvette Cooper listens to Theresa May's statement

'Sober wisdom'

House of Commons

Parliament

Liberal Democrat MP Tim Farron argues that the response to the "outrages" in Paris should be one of "sober wisdom" rather than a restriction of "British liberties". The home secretary says that this is the way in which she and the prime minister have reacted.

Plaid warns of 'England-only' debates

BBC Radio 2

Making the case for Plaid Cymru's inclusion, party leader Leanne Woods tells BBC Radio 2 that excluding them would run the risk of making the debates "England-only".

Greens: We should be in debates

BBC Radio 2

Green Party in England and Wales leader Natalie Bennett tells BBC Radio 2 that "empty-podiuming" David Cameron would not be in the interests of democracy, and that the full breadth of political opinion should be allowed - which includes the Greens. She says the broadcasters' proposals were put forward as "draft" plans.

'Watch foundation' call

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Keith Vaz, who chairs the Home Affairs Select Committee calls for a body similar to the Internet Watch Foundation to deal specifically with terrorists operating online. The internet industry set up the Internet Watch Foundation in 1996 to provide a hotline for the reporting of criminal online content.

TV debates

Norman Smith

BBC Assistant Political Editor

BBC assistant political editor Norman Smith says it is not just David Cameron facing the charge of being a "chicken". He says Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg are too - over claims they are too scared to debate the Greens, as well as the broadcasters and whether they would go ahead without David Cameron. He says his sense is that the broadcaster are "deeply cautious" about going down that route.

Devolved governments

House of Commons

Parliament

Theresa May tells SNP MP Angus Robertson that the UK government will continue to discuss preparedness for terrorist attacks with the devolved administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

'Shoulder to shoulder'

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Edward Leigh welcomes the support for France that has been shown in the UK. "Now, as for the last 100 years, our two nations stand shoulder-to-shoulder against tyranny and terror," he says.

'Snoopers' charter'

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP and former Home Secretary Jack Straw rejects the suggestion by some that proposals in the Draft Communications Data Bill - originally set out in 2012 - amount to a "snoopers' charter". Since the Paris attacks, David Cameron has said the intelligence services need new powers to store and read the contents of communications. However, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg has said the Liberal Democrats will continue to oppose a so-called "snoopers' charter".

TPIMs

House of Commons

Parliament

Theresa May says the government publishes quarterly figures of the number of people who are subject to Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures (TPIMs) which restrict the movements of terrorist suspects deemed to be a threat to national security. It is "a matter for the security services" to propose someone who should be subject to a TPIM to the home secretary, she adds.

TV debates

Daily Politics

Live on BBC Two

Nick Robinson notes that there was a 16 year gap between the first and second US presidential election debate. He says that once there is a set of televised debates "somebody works out its not in their interests". That's why David Cameron is willing to take "as much name calling as you like". On the practicality of empty-chairing David Cameron, he says it would be "a pretty big call" for broadcasters to go ahead with the debates without a party leader - or prime minister - in one of the most important elections "in years".

Jason Groves, Daily Mail deputy political editor

@JasonGroves1

Tweets: Tory veteran Tim Yeo tie-less in the Commons chamber for #PMQs. has the dress code been relaxed?

James Forsyth, Political Editor of the Spectator

@JGForsyth

Tweets: Could a 5-way televised UK election debate without the SNP in it be aired in Scotland?

'Caricatured argument'

House of Commons

Parliament

The shadow home secretary suggests that a "caricatured argument" is developing between the Conservatives and Lib Dems on new surveillance powers.

Returning militants

House of Commons

Parliament

Yvette Cooper says that around 300 people have returned from fighting with Islamic State in the Middle East. She asks whether "the security services and the police are reviewing those cases".

Yvette Cooper
BBC

Green letter

Daily Politics

Live on BBC Two

Green Party leader Natalie Bennett has written to Ed Miliband, Nick Clegg and Nigel Farage asking them to indicate to ITV that they are open to the Greens' inclusion, as she feels sure that ITV "would respond", says Daily Politics presenter Andrew Neil. Nick Robinson says the broadcasters have a common position on the formats of the debates - "UKIP in, Greens out", but that if any were to "break ranks" it would "dramatically" change things, as David Cameron could then "pick and choose" which debates to take part in.

Attack 'condemned'

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper says: "Muslims across the world have condemned an attack which is not Islamic."

Michael Savage, Times chief political correspondent

@michaelsavage

Tweets: Now seems a real problem for Lib Dems that Clegg is sat silent next to Cameron, rather than asking his own questions from elsewhere. #PMQs

Anti-terror powers

House of Commons

Parliament

The home secretary says there is no parliamentary consensus on more anti-terrorism powers. She argues that the security services need more powers to monitor communications, to murmurs of "quite right" from the Conservative benches.

'Hate preachers'

House of Commons

Parliament

Theresa May says she has "excluded more hate preachers" from the UK than any other home secretary.

PMQs: TV debates

Nick Robinson

Political editor

"A high-stakes poker game in which the ultimate prize is power - that is what the row about the party leaders' general-election TV debates has now become."

Read more from Nick on TV debates.

PMQs reaction

Nick Robinson

Political editor

Speaking on BBC 2's Daily Politics, BBC political editor Nick Robinson comments on the leaders' exchanges about the TV election debates, with David Cameron refusing to take part unless the Green Party is included. He describes it as "an incredibly high stakes poker game", with the ultimate prize being power. David Cameron thinks the debates as currently formulated "could stop him from staying in Number 10", he says, "and frankly he'll live with a bit of embarrassment to stop the debates taking place".

Picture: Theresa May

Theresa May
BBC
The Home Secretary is setting out the government's response to the Paris attacks

'Enhanced' response

House of Commons

Parliament

Theresa May says that police firearms units and the military have enhanced their response capabilities. "Future exercises" will incorporate elements of the Paris attacks, she tells MPs.

PMQs: Hopi Sen, Labour blogger

@hopisen

Tweets: I know it's important, but when leaders talk debates, all I hear is "Hello, I'm a politician and I'd like to talk about myself some more"

'Severe' threat

House of Commons

Parliament

The home secretary tells the House that the attackers in Paris claimed association with Islamic State and al-Qaeda. She adds that the UK terror threat level remains at "severe" - which means an attack is "highly likely and could occur without warning". She says that three terrorist plots have been disrupted in the UK recently.

NHS 'disinformation'

House of Commons

Parliament

One last question from PMQs to catch up with, on the NHS - provided by Labour MP Andy Slaughter, who raised concerns about his local Charing Cross Hospital. David Cameron accused him of spreading "disinformation campaign after disinformation campaign".

Terrorism statement

House of Commons

Parliament

PMQs ends and Theresa May is now making a statement on terrorism and the Paris attacks.