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Summary

  1. The day began for MPs with health questions; followed by a ten minute rule bill on local government.
  2. There was an urgent question at 12.30pm on Nuclear Management Partners (NMP) and Sellafield.
  3. There were two debates: on the Charter for Budget Responsibility and the National Policy Statement on transport.
  4. MPs then considered Lords' amendments to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill, followed by a carry-over extension on that bill and the Deregulation Bill.
  5. In the House of Lords, following oral questions, peers considered the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill in a mammoth eight hour debate at second reading.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

Goodnight

And that brings business in the Houses of Parliament to an end for today.

Peers will be back tomorrow at 15.00 GMT to debate the Recall of MPs bill.

The House of Commons will return at 11.30 GMT tomorrow as MPs prepare for the weekly battle between David Cameron and Ed Miliband at Prime Minister's questions.

Government response

House of Lords

Parliament

Home Office Minister Lord Bates is tasked with responding to this mammoth seven-and-a-half hour debate for the government.

He indicates that the government will introduce new measures at committee stage, which he suggests will cover many of the concerns raised during today's debate.

He concludes his comments by telling peers that "the first duty of the government is to assure that its citizens are safe", but he promises that these will be balanced against the need to protect civil liberties.

Scrutiny needed

House of Lords

Parliament

Shadow Home Affairs Minister Lord Rosser is now responding to the debate for Labour.

He says Labour will support the bill, as it "responds to new and changing threatens and addresses past mistakes", but he stresses the need to examine the bill to ensure it does not undermine the fight against extremism through excessive and unchecked powers.

Lord Rosser
BBC
Lord Rosser summing up Labour's position on the Counter Terrorism and Security Bill

Countering ideology

House of Lords

Parliament

Former Director of MI5 Baroness Manningham-Buller argues against putting the '

Prevent' programme on a statutory footing, saying she doubts the government is well placed to counter extremist ideology.

She says that legislation is better suited for sanctioning particular actions. "How can legislation govern hearts and minds?", she asks.

Instead the lead has to come from moderate mainstream Islam, which itself "has suffered greatly" form the actions of religious extremists, she says.

Culture of inclusion

House of Lords

Parliament

Liberal Democrat peer Lord Philips of Sudbury says that building a culture of inclusion, cooperation and tolerance is far more important than the bill.

Unless the UK's culture becomes as "beneficent as possible" towards minorities, and specifically Muslim minorities, the bill will be worthless, he argues.

On a 'hunch'

House of Lords

Parliament

Prevention of travel can not be allowed to simply be "based on the hunches" of border authorities and police, Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Kennedy of The Shaws tells peers.

More stringent safeguards are needed to prevent the "misuse and mistaken use" of the powers as they become more commonly rolled out, she argues.

Under the bill, police and border force officers will be given new powers to seize passports and tickets of British citizens at the border, for up to 30 days, if they suspect they are leaving to engage in terrorism-related activities.

Available on Hansard

House of Lords

Parliament

The first part of today's debate on the Counter Terrorism Bill is now available on

Hansard, the verbatim record of business in the Houses of Parliament.

Community approach

House of Lords

Parliament

Joint Intelligence Committee member and former Cabinet Secretary, Lord Butler of Brockwell, argues that action directed towards individuals - such as the removal of passports or exclusion from the UK - is not enough, and often comes too late.

He argues that action aimed at communities "from which jihadists may come" - such as the

Prevent and Channel programmes - must be put onto a statutory footing to oblige people in positions of power to help prevent radicalisation.

Community cohesion

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Lord Judd tells peers that security cannot be imposed on a society. Both security and policing work best when they have the endorsement of a community, he says.

The Bill will need to be scrutinised to make sure it works with societies, rather than inadvertently causing dissent or the alienation of particular groups, he argues.

'Battle for hearts and minds'

House of Lords

Parliament

Former commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Lord Condon warns that it will take generations to weed out the problem of Islamic extremism in the UK.

"This is a very long battle for hearts and minds," he tells peers.

Extremists have been indoctrinated by individuals and ideas which must be understood before they can be defeated, he adds.

Goodnight from the Commons

House of Commons

Parliament

The House of Commons is finished for the day, but MPs will return tomorrow for opposition-led debates on energy prices and the steel industry.

Meanwhile, the House of Lords is continuing its debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

Religious leaders 'should link arms'

House of Lords

Parliament

Liberal Democrat peer Lord Carlile of Berriew is speaking in the second reading debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

The former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation calls for "the religious leaders of the world to link arms" in the way that political leaders did in Paris this week.

French President Francois Hollande led the march in Paris on Sunday with other world leaders
BBC

Deaf students debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Alison Seabeck tells the House that she has been profoundly deaf in one ear since the age of 16, when she contracted mumps.

Alison Seabeck
BBC

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs back extending parliamentary time for both the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill and the Deregulation Bill, after some words of criticism of the government's management of parliamentary business from some backbench Labour MPs.

Labour MP Alison Seabeck is now leading her adjournment debate on the educational achievement of deaf students.

Another extension motion

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs consider their second carry-over extension motion, which would extend the period of parliamentary time allotted to the Deregulation Bill to 30 March.

Second Reading

House of Lords

Parliament

The second reading of a bill is the first time a bill is debated in the chambers.

Second readings are limited to the principles of the bill rather than the details of individual clauses and for major bills, such as this, debate will normally take a whole day - today's debate is expected to last until 22.00 GMT.

Because this is a second reading, the real detailed issues will not be fought out until later stages, with the usual preliminary skirmishing expected at committee stage, and perhaps some agreed government amendments on the key issues, and maybe some set-piece battles to follow at report stage.

Instead, look out for markers put down by the Opposition, the Liberal Democrats and interested peers.

Carry-over extension

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are now considering a motion to extend the period of parliamentary time allowed to the bill until 30 March.

Labour's Andrew Slaughter argues that the government is expecting the House of Lords to reinstate some or all of their amendments and bat the bill back to the Commons again.

Second government win

House of Commons

Parliament

The government wins the second vote on judicial review by 301 votes to 227 - a majority of 74.

Shifted balance

House of Lords

Parliament

Liberal Democrat peer and lawyer Lord Thomas of Gresford says that the "point of balance" between safety and civil liberties has shifted, due to an increased security risk.

Despite this, Lord Thomas highlights concerns he has with the new temporary exclusion orders and powers to withhold passports, calling on peers to fight against the use of administrative powers as an alternative to court prosecution.

Second division

House of Commons

Parliament

The House divides again to vote on amendments relating to the financing of applications for judicial review.

The government proposes that "only a person whose financial support (whether direct or indirect) exceeds, or is likely to exceed, a level set out in the rules has to be identified".

Government win

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs vote to back the government's concessions and reject the Lords amendment by 300 votes to 232 - a majority of 68.

Judicial review vote

House of Commons

Parliament

Judicial review provides a way for individuals and groups to challenge government decisions in court.

Some lawyers and campaigners have argued that the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill would impose financial penalties and make it prohibitively expensive for many people to challenge public bodies.

It would also require the court to consider the likelihood of whether there would have been a substantially different outcome for the applicant.

The government continues to disagree with the Lords, but has proposed amendments with the aim of heading off a further defeat in the Upper House, including allowing permission for judicial review if there is an "exceptional public interest".

Division

House of Commons

Parliament

The government gets its way on secure colleges, but the House divides on the government's amendments concerning judicial review.

'Fertilised ground'

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Lord Rooker warns peers that the government and the civil service will often try and push through legislation giving them increased powers following a terrorist attack, because the "ground is fertilised" for new powers.

He admits that when he was a Home Affairs Minister following the 9/11 attacks there was a "trawl around Whitehall for emergency legislation".

But he argues Parliament will have enough time to scrutinise the bill as it passes through the Lords over four weeks.

Grieve unconvinced

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP and former Attorney General Dominic Grieve says he is not convinced that the government's concessions on judicial review will not "excessively fetter judicial discretion" and he cannot support the government.

Dominic Grieve
BBC

Judicial review

House of Commons

Parliament

Following a speech from Conservative MP Geoffrey Cox - who is rebelling against his own side's position on judicial review - Justice Secretary Chris Grayling is summing up for the government.

Mr Grayling says that he thinks that in the "unhappy event" of a Labour government in May, it will not seek to reverse the bill's restrictions on judicial review.

New threat

House of Lords

Parliament

Founding Chairman of Migration Watch Lord Green of Deddington tells peers that he has been an intended victim of terrorism in the past during his roles as the head of the counter-terrorism department in the Foreign Office and ambassador to Syria.

During his

maiden speech, the second of the day, he says the terrorist threat against the UK is of "a completely different order of magnitude" to that of the past.

To combat this threat he argues for provisions in the bill need to go further, suggesting data retention powers may need to be expanded to include social media in the future.

Lord Green of Deddington
BBC
Founding Chairman of Migration Watch Lord Green of Deddington makes his maiden speech

Labour opposition

House of Commons

Parliament

Andrew Slaughter says the government's plans for judicial review aim to "discourage applications".

"A Labour government after May will restore judicial review," he tells MPs, adding that Labour will oppose the government's plans today.

'Bare minimum'

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow justice minister Andrew Slaughter says: "I'd urge caution in accepting any reassurances from this government that they have made concessions."

He accuses the justice secretary of offering "the bare minimum that he thinks he can get away with".

He adds that Labour opposes secure colleges "on principle".

Joint Committee on Human Rights

House of Lords

Parliament

The Joint Committee on Human Rights has also published a report on the Counter Terrorism and Security Bill, highlighting concerns that plans could threaten free speech, and lack proper parliamentary scrutiny or judicial oversight.

Dr Hywel Francis MP, Chair of the Committee, said:

"We are satisfied that in some areas there are gaps in the Government's counter terrorism powers but some of the powers proposed in this Bill require extra safeguards so that they are not used unreasonably and to permit individuals affected to challenge them where there are grounds to do so.

....This balance between liberties and security is a difficult one to tread, but the Government's attempt in this Bill to place a duty upon universities in connection with the Prevent strategy has not been well thought-through. It might result in that academic freedom and freedom of speech which we know are key to the functioning of a democratic society being restricted."

The full report can be found

here.

Ping pong

House of Commons

Parliament

The Criminal Justice and Courts Bill is in a process known as "ping pong" in which it bounces between the Commons and the Lords until the final form of the bill is agreed.

Peers are pressing a number of amendments which MPs have already rejected.

These include a vote in the Lords to exclude all females, and males under the age of 18, from the government's planned secure colleges.

Peers have also insisted on amendments to changes in the law relating to judicial review.

'Unfinished business'

House of Lords

Parliament

Former Director-General of MI5 Lord Evans of Weardale is making his maiden speech in the House of Lords.

The maiden speech is the first speech made by a peer after joining the House of Lords and is expected to be short and uncontroversial to avoid the need for interruption- it is a tradition that maiden speeches cannot be interrupted.

In his remarks Lord Evans indicates that he supports the bill, but complains that it is incomplete, leaving a lot of "unfinished business" that the House of Lords will have to legislate on at a later date.

Jonathan Evans
BBC
Former Director-General of the British Security Service Jonathan Evans makes his first speech as Lord Evans of Weardale

Criminal Justice and Courts Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

The national policy document is approved without a vote and MPs move on to consideration of Lords' amendments to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill.

Summing up

House of Commons

Parliament

Summing up for the government, Transport Minister Robert Goodwill jokes: "I suspect that Hornby electrified more railways than the last Labour government."

Shadow minister Lilian Greenwood intervenes to say that the High Speed 1 rail line opened under the last Labour government.

Heightened atmosphere

House of Lords

Parliament

Former Chair of the Joint Intelligence Committee Baroness Neville-Jones warns that the House of Lords must be cautious about legislating in the heightened atmosphere

generated by the event in Paris.

However, the Paris killings show that overseas terrorist training is being used by citizens in their home countries, and that strong counter-terrorism powers - including the right to temporarily exclude citizens and withhold their passports - are needed to prevent future deaths, she argues.

Qualified backing

House of Commons

Parliament

Lilian Greenwood tells the House that Labour will not vote against the policy statement as her party backs investment in infrastructure.

Lilian Greenwood
BBC

'Incredulous'

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP and former Transport Minister Simon Burns says he is "incredulous" at some of Ms Greenwood's comments.

Billions of pounds are being invested in roads and railways under the current government, he claims.

However, he argues that planning in the UK has suffered from "short-termism" for many years.

Simon Burns
BBC

Judicial oversight

House of Lords

Parliament

Earlier in the debate Home Affairs Minster Lord Bates repeated the government's commitment to "looking again" at judicial oversight for temporary exclusion orders, and would return a verdict at a later stage of the bill.

The commitment was first made in the House of Commons by

Immigration Minister James Brokenshire following concerns raised by MPs and David Anderson, the
Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, that the new power had too little oversight which could lead to abuse.

'Criticism' of policy plans

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow transport minister Lilian Greenwood says the government's "initial draft received criticism from many quarters".

She claims that it "is unclear that any significant revision has taken place" following criticism from MPs on the Transport Committee.

The government carried out a consultation on its draft proposals between December 2013 and February 2014.

The document being debated today was published as a command paper in December 2014.

Constitutional committee report

House of Lords

Parliament

Yesterday the House of Lords Constitution Committee - which examines all Public Bills for constitutional implications - published a report on the bill yesterday dealing with many of the key issues.

Amongst other things, they recommended that temporary exclusion orders should be subject to judicial oversight - one of the hot topics of today's debate.

The full report can be found

here.