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Summary

  1. MPs met in the House of Commons at 11.30 GMT for questions to the ministerial team at the Foreign Office.
  2. The day's main business was an Opposition day debate, called by Plaid Cymru and the Scottish National Party, on Trident renewal.
  3. MPs voted overwhelmingly to reject calls for the proposed replacement of Trident to be scrapped.
  4. The adjournment debate was on TTIP and the poultry industry, led by Lib Dem MP Roger Williams.
  5. Peers met at 14.30 GMT for oral questions; followed by debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill in a committee of the whole House.
  6. The short debate was on including boys in the vaccination programme for the human papilloma virus.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Pippa Simm

All times stated are UK

Democracy Day continues

Don't forget that Democracy Day continues with an extended edition of Today in Parliament on BBC Radio 4 at 23.00 GMT.

Goodnight from the Lords

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers conclude the first day of committee stage on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill and adjourn for the night.

The House of Lords will return tomorrow from 15.00 GMT, when it will consider Commons amendments to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill.

Peers will also hold a debate on a report by the Communications Committee on broadcasters and general election debates.

The House of Commons sits from 11.30 GMT. Highlights include Prime Minister's Questions and an Opposition day debate on the NHS.

Exclusion orders question

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative peer Baroness Warsi - a former Foreign Office Minister - asks about an individual who, for example, disputes allegations against them and wants to return to the UK to clear their name.

"How long do we anticipate this person to be outside the country?" she asks.

Baroness Warsi
BBC

Temporary exclusion orders

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers are discussing amendments relating to temporary exclusion orders, which would control the return to the UK of citizens suspected of involvement in terrorism.

Labour peers are seeking reassurances over the "permit to return" - an order by the home secretary giving an individual who is subject to a temporary exclusion order permission to return to the UK.

Home Office Minister Lord Bates attempts to reassure peers who are concerned that UK citizens could be left stateless.

"The passport is not something that is the same as citizenship," he says.

Today in Parliament on Democracy Day

As part of Democracy Day, Radio 4 will be broadcasting a specially extended edition of Today in Parliament from 23.00 GMT.

There will be reports from Myanmar, Moscow, the European Parliament and the devolved institutions, as well as a full round-up of the day in Westminster.

Committee stage resumes

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers resume their scrutiny of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill, which contains provisions about the retention of communications information, exclusion powers and security.

Short break

House of Lords

Parliament

The short debate is over and the House takes a few minutes' break before resuming debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

Government advice

House of Lords

Parliament

Health Minister Earl Howe tells peers that the government takes advice on vaccination programmes from the

Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI).

The JCVI "keeps all vaccination matters under review", the minister says.

The decision to apply the current vaccination programme for HPV to girls only was taken following advice from the JCVI, he adds.

Earl Howe
BBC

'Major campaign'

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour spokeswoman Baroness Wheeler calls for "a major campaign" to educate people about "the major impact that HPV can have".

More about HPV

House of Lords

Parliament

The human papilloma virus (HPV) is a family of viruses that affect the skin and the body's moist membranes.

As well as causing most cervical cancers, HPV has been linked to oral tumours, which are more prevalent in men and are diagnosed most frequently in people over 60.

The incidence of oral cancer in people under 40 is rising, due to alcohol intake and exposure to HPV.

Experts warn that in most cases oral cancers are caused by heavy smoking and heavy drinking, not HPV.

Commons finishes for the day

House of Commons

Parliament

After some final remarks from the minister, the day in the House of Commons comes to an end.

Do stay with us though, as we continue to bring you live coverage of the House of Lords, where peers are currently taking part in a short debate on the human papilloma virus (HPV).

TTIP 'benefits'

House of Commons

Parliament

Minister George Eustice stresses the benefits of TTIP, and says it is a government priority to secure the best deal for the UK.

He acknowledges the UK poultry industry's concerns about the deal, such as whether it places the industry at a competitive disadvantage.

But he assures MPs that EU negotiators have "consistently stated" that the EU's food safety standards will be upheld.

About HPV

House of Lords

Parliament

HPV is a sexually-transmitted infection which can lead to cervical cancer in women.

The national vaccination programme, which has been in place since 2008, applies to all girls aged 12 and 13.

Arguing that boys should also be vaccinated, Lord Patel says HPV does not just cause cervical cancer but is responsible for "a wide range of cancers" in both women and men.

Lord Patel of Bradford
BBC

Government response

House of Commons

Parliament

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Minister George Eustice is charged with responding to the debate on behalf of the government.

He begins by stressing the value of the poultry industry to the UK economy.

It supports about 73,000 jobs and contributes £3.3bn annually to GDP, he says.

HPV debate

House of Lords

Parliament

The committee stage of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill breaks for an hour and peers are taking part in a short debate on a topic tabled by Labour peer Lord Patel of Bradford.

Lord Patel is asking what action the government is taking to include all adolescent boys in the national vaccination programme for human papilloma virus (HPV).

Caution urged

House of Commons

Parliament

Roger Williams, the MP for Brecon and Radnorshire, acknowledges that that TTIP could bring "huge opportunity" to the food sector but urges caution, warning that the deal should not come at the expense of food safety.

Poultry meat production methods in the United States "are by no means equivalent to those in the United Kingdom", he tells MPs.

"The United States industry wishes to export its products produced to standards that are not equivalent to ours into the UK market.

"TTIP risks providing them with a vehicle to do so."

What is TTIP?

TTIP is an EU-US trade deal primarily designed to cut tariffs and regulatory barriers to trade between the US and EU countries, making it easier for companies on both sides of the Atlantic to access each other's markets.

You can read more about it

here.

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Liberal Democrat MP Roger Williams now has the floor, to lead a short half-hour debate on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the poultry industry.

Last business

House of Commons

Parliament

It's almost time for the adjournment debate - but not before the House whittles through its remaining orders of the day, including presentation of petitions.

Motion defeated

House of Commons

Parliament

The results are in and MPs have rejected calls for the UK's Trident nuclear weapons system not to be renewed.

The motion - put forward by the SNP, Plaid Cymru and the Greens - was defeated by 364 votes to 35, a government majority of 329.

Voting process

House of Commons

Parliament

Divisions in the Commons tend to take about 15 minutes.

MPs have to queue up and give their name to a "teller" in either the "Aye" or "No" lobbies, which are situated behind the government and opposition sides of the chamber, respectively.

The result is then read out by the tellers for the winning side, and confirmed by the Speaker.

Voting time

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are now voting on the motion - tabled by the SNP, Paid Cyrmu and the Greens - which calls for the Trident nuclear weapons system not to be renewed.

The result is expected at about 19.15 GMT.

Government response

House of Commons

Parliament

Defence Minister Philip Dunne has the final word in the debate, as he sums up on behalf of the government.

He dismisses estimates - cited by the motion's supporters - that the overall cost of replacing Trident would be £100bn, saying: "We do not recognise that figure."

He puts the cost in the region of £15-20bn at 2006 prices, cited in a government white paper of that same year.

Mr Dunne urges MPs to reject the motion.

'Best deterrence'

House of Commons

Parliament

Green MP Caroline Lucas, who is the penultimate backbench speaker in the debate, explains that she supports the motion - which opposes Trident renewal - for moral, security, economic and legal reasons.

She says "the "best deterrence of all" is to work with other nations "to address the global threats we face", such as people trafficking, poverty and climate change.

Probing amendments

House of Lords

Parliament

A number of the amendments being debated today are so-called "probing" amendments.

Probing amendments are not intended to end up as part of the bill but instead to initiate debate on a particular aspect of the legislation.

Passports seized

House of Lords

Parliament

Over in the House of Lords, debate continues on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

Peers are considering an amendment from a group of backbench Liberal Democrat peers concerning compensation for those who have their passports seized and who turn out not to have been involved in wrongdoing.

"A judicial authority shall have the power to direct payment of compensation by the secretary of state to any person whose travel document is seized (whether or not retained)," the amendment reads.

MP rejects 'arms race'

House of Commons

Parliament

Anti-war campaigner and Labour MP Jeremy Corbyn says the "incredible" amount of money needed to renew Trident could be better spent elsewhere.

The Islington North MP argues that a "secure world" is not created by an arms race but by looking at the issues that divide the world.

"Can't we look in a different direction and deliver a different foreign policy that brings that about, rather than the arid idea that all we need to do is spend phenomenal sums of money in order to threaten to destroy the whole planet?" he asks.

Jeremy Corbyn
BBC

'Impotent nationalism'

House of Commons

Parliament

Sedgefield MP Phil Wilson offers another Labour voice in support of the Trident nuclear weapons system - and claims the supporters of the motion "want to retreat from the world".

Britain is a "force for good" in the world, he says, adding: "It should not be diminished by impotent nationalism which believes the best way of solving the problems of the world is by withdrawing from the world."

'No realistic alternative'

House of Commons

Parliament

Liberal Democrat Alan Reid cautions that it would be "wrong" for Britain to go down a path of unilateral nuclear disarmament.

The Argyll and Bute MP says there is "no realistic alternative" to the current Trident nuclear weapons system, which he describes as an "insurance policy" - and advocates the building of replacement submarines.

'Cool, calm consideration'

House of Commons

Parliament

Welcoming the debate, Crispin Blunt, the Conservative MP for Reigate, says there needs to be a "cool, calm consideration" of the merits of the weapons system.

He says he has become "increasingly uncomfortable" with the prospect of renewing Trident - and tells MPs he will back the motion.

It is a "political weapons system" with "very little doubtful military use", he says - asserting that it should not come at the expense of a "coherent" defence programme, and therefore should not be paid for from the defence budget.

'Complete strategic nonsense'

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Bernard Jenkin berates the Liberal Democrats over their position on Trident renewal, insisting that a part-time deterrent would be "complete strategic nonsense".

The Essex North MP claims the party is trying to use Trident as a "bargaining chip" for future coalition negotiations in the event of another hung parliament in May.

He says Labour and the Conservatives are "quite near" making it clear to the Lib Dems that until their "stupid policy" is taken off the table there is "no conversation" to be had about any future coalition with them.

Baroness Kennedy speech

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Kennedy of the Shaws
BBC
Labour peer and barrister Baroness Kennedy of the Shaws speaks in the debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

Trident cost attacked

House of Commons

Parliament

Plaid Cymru MP Jonathan Edwards - whose party has co-signed the motion against Trident renewal - takes the floor.

He says renewal of the nuclear weapons system is estimated to cost £100bn over its lifetime, and questions how this can be justifiable when schools and hospitals are "crying out for investment".

Grounds for suspicion

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers are considering another Labour amendment to the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill, which deals with police powers of "search and seizure" at UK ports.

The bill would empower police to search someone suspected of intending to leave the UK "for the purpose of involvement in terrorism-related activity".

An officer would have powers of search if he or she had "reasonable grounds" for suspicion, but Labour's amendment would require "evidence or intelligence".

Cost-effective way?

House of Commons

Parliament

"Our position," Vernon Coaker tells MPs, is that "it is right for the UK to maintain a credible, minimum independent nuclear deterrent based on a continuous at-sea posture."

Pressed by Defence Minister Philip Dunne to confirm that this would require four submarines, Mr Coaker says the current evidence supports that argument.

"But what we have said of course as part of the Strategic Defence and Security Review that we will look to see whether a continuous at-sea deterrent can be delivered in a more cost effective way."

Vernon Coaker
BBC

Labour's views

House of Commons

Parliament

Speaking on behalf of the opposition, shadow defence secretary Vernon Coaker says Labour is proud to be an "internationalist multilateralist party" which is firmly working with others towards a world without nuclear weapons.

But he says to abandon Britain's nuclear weapons system unilaterally at this stage in the disarmament process would "do more harm than good".

"In the current climate it would make Britain less secure and would send out exactly the signals at a very sensitive moment in international relations," he tells MPs.

Challenge on renewal

House of Commons

Parliament

The SNP's Angus Robertson challenges Defence Secretary Michael Fallon's earlier characterisation of the party's opposition to Trident as "irresponsible".

He claims it is an attempt to "create a phoney debate on a phoney choice" on Trident - and asserts that mainstream public opinion does not support its renewal.

'Sunset clause' withdrawn

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Lord Rosser says his party backs powers to temporarily seize passports in the current security situation, but that situation may change.

That is why Labour supports a "sunset clause" allowing the power to lapse after two years and be renewed if Parliament chooses to do so, he argues.

However, he withdraws his party's amendment.

Amendments are rarely pushed to a vote in

committee stage in the Lords under parliamentary convention, though peers may reintroduce amendments at
report stage.

What are the threats?

House of Commons

Parliament

Rory Stewart, Conservative MP and Defence Select Committee chair, tells MPs he will vote in favour of retention of the Trident nuclear deterrent - but says he has "enormous respect" for those MPs who have "anxieties" about it.

While the threats facing the UK are not the same as during the Cold War, he says, he cautions that "we don't known what [Russian President Vladimir] Putin is doing" - raising the prospect of a Russian nuclear attack on a Baltic state.

Mr Stewart says Putin's decisions on warfare will be guided by his perception of what "we, the US or Britain are likely to do in response" - arguing that deterrence depends on whether the "other side" believes the UK would use its nuclear weapons.

"Which is why there is absolutely no point us having a discussion about a nuclear deterrent without looking at our defence strategy and posture in general," he adds.

Investing in "fancy bits of kit" will be "meaningless" unless people believe the UK is prepared to use them.

Labour amendment

House of Lords

Parliament

The bill includes measures on the retention of communications information, exclusion powers and security.

Peers are debating amendments relating to the power to temporarily seize passports from terror suspects.

Labour has proposed giving Parliament the chance to debate and vote on the continuation of that power after two years.