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Summary

  1. Following PMQs, MPs took part in Opposition day debates on government spending and the NHS and sustainable development goals.
  2. The adjournment debate was on funding for the hormone replacement therapy implant. There was also a ten minute rule bill on rented homes.
  3. Peers met at 15.00 GMT for oral questions.
  4. They are dealing with the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill in a committee of the whole House.
  5. Health Spokeswoman Baroness Jolly repeated the answer to an urgent question on major incidents in the NHS.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

End of Business

And that's it. After a mammoth session the Counter Terrorism and Security Bill passes its committee stage in the House of Lords, and peers, finally, go home for the night.

Peers will be back again tomorrow at 11.00 GMT for a two major debates on the government's support for British exports; and on the progress of the government's school reforms.

MPs will be back at 09.30 GMT for a series of mini question times, starting with half an hour for environment, food and rural affairs, before giving the MPs who speak for the Church Commissioners, the Public Accounts Commission and the Speakers' Committee on the Electoral Commission their moment of glory.

Drop the board

House of Lords

Parliament

Former Head of the Home Civil Service Lord Butler of Brockwell calls for the government to drop its plans to create the Privacy and Civil Liberties Board in order to do further work on defining the board's role.

The next government can then use this information to make an informed decision on creating such a board after the May general election, he argues.

Lord Butler of Brockwell
BBC

Unclear on Privacy Board

House of Lords

Parliament

Several peers are criticising the government over the lack of clarity in the bill on the role of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Board, which the bill creates.

The government are still

consulting on the role of the board despite the bill currently going through parliament.

'Counter Terrorism Oversight Panel'

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour are tabling and amendment to change the name of the proposed

Privacy and Civil Liberties Board to the "Counter Terrorism Oversight Panel".

Labour argue that the body is being up to advise the government on counter terrorism policy rather than scrutinising policy for its impact on privacy and civil liberties and should have a name that reflects its functions.

Expanding powers

House of Lords

Parliament

In an effort to head of an amendment by Lord Pannick, Lord Bates tells peers that the government are considering expanding the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation powers to cover all areas of law that can relate to counter-terrorism, such as immigration law and the prerogative power in relation to passports.

The government will report on the measure, first recommend by the

Joint Committee on Human Rights, at the report stage of the bill, due to take place next week.

Looting panel

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative peer Baroness Berridge calls on the government to create a special panel to investigate the funding of terrorism via looted of artefacts in Iraq and Syria, many of which are being bought in Europe.

"Most reports indicate these stolen treasures are finding their way in, to or through London" she says.

Police only power

House of Lords

Parliament

Government spokesman Lord Ashton of Hyde tells peers that anyone can refer someone they believe is vulnerable to becoming radicalised for an assessment.

However a large amount of relevant information must be gathered to assess if an individual is suitable for the Channel programme, he tells peers.

Keeping the police force as the only body that can refer people to the Channel programme "avoids an unnecessary duplication of effort" he says.

Local authorities powers

House of Lords

Parliament

Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Hamwee is tabling an amendment to allow local authorities to refer individuals to "channel panels" - intensive one-to-one mentoring programme to challenge violent views and de-radicalise an individual.

At the moment only senior police officers can refer people to these panels.

She is tabling the amendment at the request of London authorities, she tells peers

'Wrong' to delay prevent

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Bates disagrees with Lord Philips' claims, telling peers the Prevent strategy was reviewed in 2011 and has been "kept under review" ever since then.

The government's view is that is "wrong ... to delay the implementation of this important duty in order to carry out yet another review", which could take many months, he warns.

If any future review finds faults with the government's policy it can be amended, if agreed to by both houses, he adds.

Suspending proposals

House of Lords

Parliament

Liberal Democrat peer Lord Philips of Sudbury criticises the government for failing to provide "adequate fact or evidence" to justify its new Prevent proposals.

He calls for section five of the bill, which cover the government's Prevent proposals, to be suspended until a review of the workings of the existing prevent strategy is carried out in order to give "parliament enough information at its back to reach the right decision."

Lord Philips of Sudbury
BBC

Government response

House of Lords

Parliament

Nurseries are contained on the list because children may let slip that their relatives may be involved in terrorism, Lord Bates replies. As "public bodies" they should be contained on the list with other education establishments.

However "common sense will be applied" he adds.

Baroness Smith isn't convinced. "Unless there is a clear cut duty [for nursery teachers] I struggle to find to good explanation [for including nursery teachers]" she says.

Counter-terrorist nurseries?

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour spokeswoman Baroness Smith of Basildon asks why nurseries are included in the list of organisations covered by Prevent.

She asks if children be will referred to the authorities for saying terrorist related things they could have picked up from TV or films.

"Children say things that are inappropriate, but they don't mean them and they don't understand them" she argues.

Equalities amendment

House of Lords

Parliament

The peers return from their dinner break and go straight into debating a Baroness Hamwee tabled amendment to require the guidance given to organisations covered by the Prevent strategy to promote "equalities issues".

Dinner break

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers now break - or "adjourn during pleasures" in procedural vernacular - for 30 minutes to give themselves a chance to grab some dinner. They will return at around 20.30 GMT.

Already covered

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Bates assures peers that unitary authorities are already covered under the local government heading of the prevent strategy.

Prevent in unitary authorities

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers now move to a Labour tabled amendment to include "unitary authorities" in the list of organisations covered by the Prevent strategy.

Unitary authorities are single tier local authorities responsible for almost all local government functions within certain areas.

Goodnight from the Commons

House of Commons

Parliament

That's the end of business in the Commons for today.

MPs return tomorrow from 09:30 GMT, when the main business will include a debate on the Iraq Inquiry.

Stay with us tonight as peers continue their debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

'No doubt' universities should be included

House of Lords

Parliament

Reeling off some figures, Lord Bates tells peers that between 1999 and 2009 about 30% of people convicted of al-Qaeda associated terrorism offences had attended a higher education institution.

Young people in the 18-24 age group make up 30% of terrorist-related convictions and many are radicalised at university, he adds.

The Prevent duty is designed to apply to sectors that can most effectively protect vulnerable people from radicalisation, he says.

"There is no doubt that universities are one of them."

Picture: Tracey Crouch

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Tracey Crouch leads tonight's adjournment debate
BBC

About HRT

House of Commons

Parliament

Hormone replacement therapy treats the symptoms of menopause which can include thinning bones and hot flushes.

An HRT implant involves having small pellets of oestrogen inserted under the skin of the stomach, buttock or thigh.

Side effects of HRT can include bloating, headaches, indigestion and depression.

Fair application

House of Lords

Parliament

Home Office Minister Lord Bates asks if it is fair to apply the Prevent strategy to local government, criminal justice services, probation services, prisons, education, childcare, health and social care, and the police - but not to universities.

The Prevent duty requires universities to engage with the extremist groups and challenge their views, as well as spot and report people they believe are on the path to becoming terrorists, he adds.

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Which brings us to the final business in the Commons: an adjournment debate on funding for the hormone replacement therapy implant.

Conservative MP Tracey Crouch leads the debate.

Second Opposition defeat

House of Commons

Parliament

The Labour motion is defeated by 290 votes to 200, giving the government a majority of 90.

Vote on Labour motion

House of Commons

Parliament

But divide the House does, as MPs vote on the Labour motion on sustainable development goals.

The motion "regrets that the government failed to bring forward legislation to enshrine in law the commitment to spend 0.7 per cent of Gross National Income on international aid as set out in the coalition agreement; further regrets that this government has failed to support standalone sustainable development goals on health and climate change; and calls on the government to show global leadership on tackling the causes of poverty inequality and climate change".

Labour response

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Smith of Basildon is now responding to the debate for Labour.

She criticises the government for bringing forward proposals that are still open to consultation.

Whilst she says she is open to putting obligations on universities under the Prevent strategy, she says the current proposals are "poorly drafted" and could prove to be damaging.

Minister claims agreement

House of Commons

Parliament

International Development Minister Desmond Swayne says he has "searched for the motion that divides us" and claims MPs on both agree on the 0.7% target for aid spending.

He criticises Labour for "seeking to divide the House" over a matter of "process".

Desmond Swayne
BBC

'Obligation' of religious organisations

House of Lords

Parliament

The Bishop of Chester, the Rt Revd Dr Peter Forster, asks why religious organisations are not mentioned in the list of organisations covered under the Prevent strategy.

"We need to stop beating around the bush and see that alongside the guarantee of freedom of religious speech and the charitable status [of religious organisations] that there is an obligation that should be stated in law," he argues.

Summing up for Labour

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow international development minister Anas Sarwar is summing up for the Opposition in the debate on sustainable development goals.

He claims Labour in government "led on cancelling debt" and "drove the efforts on the Millennium Development goals".

He criticises the coalition's efforts on development, to Tory dismay, but praises Lib Dem Michael Moore's private members' bill to guarantee 0.7% of GDP being spent on aid.

Anas Sarwar
BBC

'Jeopardising' efforts

House of Lords

Parliament

Former Director of MI5 Baroness Manningham-Buller tells peers that that efforts to counter terrorism need to be carried out with "sensitivity, proportionality and care". Forcing universities to spy on their students and restrict freedom of speech will "jeopardise" this, she argues.

Extremist opinions need to "exposed, challenged and countered" she adds, and argues universities are "one of the most important arenas for challenging extremist views and ideologies."

'Too blunt an instrument'

House of Lords

Parliament

Human rights lawyer Lord Pannick points out that freedom of speech is already limited in universities by the law of defamation, restrictions on threatening language and prohibition of support for banned organisations.

However, he argues that the Prevent strategy is "far too blunt an instrument" and will impose a duty on universities which is "very difficult to reconcile with the very idea of a university, whose job it is to encourage academic debate and dissent".

Lord Pannick
BBC

'Hard-won consensus'

House of Commons

Parliament

Liberal Democrat MP Michael Moore, a former international development spokesman for his party, says Labour did work in government to move towards "the 0.7% target" for spending on aid.

However, he criticises Labour for giving no credit to the coalition.

"People will judge us harshly if a hard-won consensus does not appear to hold," he says.

Mr Moore is the sponsor of a

private members' bill which would put into legislation the target of spending at least 0.7% of national income on aid.

'Fracturing' universities

House of Lords

Parliament

Former director of public prosecutions Lord Macdonald of River Glaven argues against the government's plans to create a legal obligation for universities to monitor and tackle extremism on their campuses.

The Liberal Democrat peer, who is warden of Wadham College at Oxford University, argues that what is being proposed is a form of "institutionalised censorship with academics at its heart".

"Universities are not places for surveillance and they cannot become so without fracturing what is best about them," he adds.

TB 'emergency'

House of Commons

Parliament

Nick Herbert raises the global danger posed by tuberculosis.

The disease "was declared a global emergency more than 20 years ago", he says, adding that it "kills as many people every two days as Ebola has in total".

Who's who?

Hansard is the official record of Parliament. Our BBC parliamentary correspondent for Wales, David Cornock, has the story of one parliamentary mix up...

David Cornock

BBC Wales Parliamentary correspondent

One is Labour MP for Ynys Mon; the other is Labour MP for Caerphilly.

But for one unfortunate Hansard reporter, they are both called Albert Owen. Readers of the official report on Monday's House of Commons debates will have noticed an intervention from someone of that name during questions to the secretary of state for work and pensions.

Except the intervention didn't come from Mr Owen, but from his colleague Wayne David, who was most put out - in a genial way - to discover his words credited to the Ynys Mon MP.

"Albert Owen wasn't there," Mr David tells me. "It was me. I can't understand how they mixed us up. I'm a south Walian, he's a north Walian. I'm much taller than him. I've got more hair."

I'm not sure the last argument is really a clincher, but the Caerphilly MP joked that he was now consulting his solicitor. It doesn't help his case that he was 550th in a "sexiest MP" poll, more than two hundred places behind Mr Owen).

Be that as it may,

Hansard has now corrected the record online and Mr David's views on job creation in Shipley and Yorkshire are now recorded correctly for posterity.

Human Rights Committee recommendations

The committee found that further safeguards are required for some of the new measures proposed to plug gaps in the government's counter-terrorism powers.

The committee recommended:

  • judicial oversight for temporary exclusion orders - which prevent suspected terrorists from returning to the UK for up to two years
  • judicial oversight of new powers for police and some border officers to seize passports if they have reasonable suspicion that someone is travelling abroad for terror-related activity
  • providing legal aid and a special advocate for those who have had their passport seized
  • removing universities from the list of organisations covered by the new statutory prevent strategy
  • extending the powers of Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, David Anderson QC to cover all areas of law that can relate to counter-terrorism, such as immigration law and the prerogative power in relation to passports, and
  • removing David Anderson as head of the proposed Privacy and Civil Liberties Board, so that it can act as an independent body.

'Somewhat petulant'

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Dame Tessa Jowell suggests it is "somewhat petulant" of Conservatives to suggest that the Opposition cannot criticise policy on international development.

"Consensus can only come from this kind of scrutiny and opportunity for debate," she argues.

Human Rights Committee

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Lister of Buttersett is tabling a series of amendments, aimed at implementing the

recommendations of the Human Rights Committee into the bill.

Independent evaluation

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Bates says putting the Prevent strategy on a statutory footing will allow it to be "evaluated independently of government" as it is implemented consistently across the country.

Lord Bates
BBC

Picture: Justine Greening

House of Commons

Parliament

Justine Greening
BBC
Justine Greening makes the opening speech for the government

'Evidence' based

House of Lords

Parliament

Home Office Minster Lord Bates argues that the government's prevent strategy is built upon evidence, including visits to over 150 universities and a series of public consultations, but admits it may not be the level of "empirical evidence" that some peers may like.

Putting Prevent on a statutory footing is about spreading best practice, he adds.