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Summary

  1. The day in the Commons began at 14.30 GMT with Communities and Local Government questions.
  2. Care Minister Norman Lamb made a statement on the number of specialist children's mental health in-patient beds, in response to an urgent question from Labour's Luciana Berger.
  3. MPs then turned their attention to the second reading of the Armed Forces (Service Complaints and Financial Assistance) Bill.
  4. Following that, MPs greed to Lords' amendments to the Social Action, Responsibility and Heroism Bill. The bill will now become law.
  5. Peers followed oral questions with report stage consideration of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.
  6. Focus was on amendments to give the security services new powers to obtain communications data - dubbed the snoopers' charter.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

Goodnight

Robert Goodwill brings his remarks to a close which brings today's business in the Houses of Parliament to an end.

MPs will back tomorrow at 11.30 GMT for Justice questions.

Peers will be back at 2.30 GMT for the report stage of the Deregulation Bill.

Government response

House of Commons

Parliament

Transport Minister Robert Goodwill is now responding to the debate for the government.

'Poor' trial

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Caroline Spelman says that while she welcomes the proposed new flight paths from Birmingham airport, the new flight path trials were "poor, with long running problems" leading to noise pollution for many residents.

Spelman
BBC

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs now turn to the day's final business; the adjournment debate, today led by Meriden MP Caroline Spelman on flight path changes at Birmingham Airport.

Workplace pensions

House of Commons

Parliament

In a flurry of voting MPs agree to remove the annual contribution limit and transfer restrictions on NEST workplace pension schemes by 261 votes to 56, a government majority of 205.

NEST is a trust-based, occupational pension scheme established by the government to support automatic enrolment.

New speed limits

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs then pass a motion to increase the national speed limit for heavy goods vehicles of more than 7.5 tonnes on single carriageways from 40 mph to 50 mph, and on dual carriageways from 50 mph to 60 mph, in England and Wales.

The motion passes by 263 votes to 62, a government majority of 201.

Motion approved

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs unanimously agree the motion to allow the Scottish Parliament to legislate on 16 and 17-year-olds voting in the next Scottish Parliament elections, in 2016.

Goodnight from the Lords

House of Lords

Parliament

That's it from the House of Lords for today.

Peers return tomorrow from 14:30 GMT for questions to ministers.

The main business will be report stage debate on the Deregulation Bill.

Stay with us tonight as MPs continue to debate the Draft Scotland Act Order.

'Widening the franchise'

House of Commons

Parliament

Angus Robertson, the SNP's leader in Westminster, argues that "widening the franchise" will help people to engage with politics.

He praises the involvement of 16 and 17-year-olds in the Scottish independence referendum last year.

"The fact that it won't happen for Westminster elections is frankly shameful," he adds.

Picture: Alistair Carmichael

House of Commons

Parliament

Alistair Carmichael
BBC

Lower age for local elections

House of Commons

Parliament

The proposals would also allow the Scottish parliament to lower the voting age for the 2017 local elections, Alistair Carmichael tells MPs.

Scotland motion

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs now turn to debate on a motion on transfer of functions from Westminster to Scottish ministers to enable them to allow 16 and 17-year-olds to vote in the next Scottish parliament elections, in 2016.

The participation of 16 and 17 year olds in the Scottish Independence referendum "was truly historic and inspirational" and showed they were "more than capable of being a part of Scottish democracy" Scottish Secretary Alistair Carmichael tells MPs as he presents the motion to MPs.

Hero Bill passed

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs unanimously agree to the two amendments and the bill is passed.

Despite widespread derision the Social Action, Responsibility and Heroism Bill has now passed all stage in the Houses of Parliament and will be sent for Royal Assent and become law.

Final business

House of Lords

Parliament

That ends the first day of report stage debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

Peers will return to the bill on Wednesday.

The final business tonight is a short debate on the provision of NHS sign language services for deaf people suffering mental health problems.

Labour peer Lord Ponsonby of Shulbrede is opening the debate.

'Nero not Hero'

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow Justice Minister Andrew Slaughter casts Chris Grayling as Nero "fiddling while Rome Burns" in debating this bill today.

Mr Slaughter points to the

resignation of the chief inspector of the probation service in England and Wales and the chief inspector of prisons Nick Hardwick's decision not to reapply for his role as examples of a crisis in the justice sector.

With all of that going on Mr Grayling is more "Nero than Hero" he suggests.

'Threat is real'

House of Lords

Parliament

Home Office Minister Lord Bates says the UK faces "cross-religion and cross-cultural threats" including from the far right.

"The threat is real" and the gap in legislation keeping up with technology "is real", he adds.

Picture: Chris Grayling

House of Commons

Parliament

Chris Grayling
BBC

Social Action, Responsibility and Heroism Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs now move to the Social Action, Responsibility and Heroism Bill, which received a bit of a panning in the House of Lords.

Crossbench human rights lawyer, Lord Pannick said that "its contents are not objectionable; they are simply pointless. Such a bill is not worthy of provoking a fundamental conflict between the two Houses of Parliament."

Despite this - or perhaps because of this - Justice Secretary, and Lord Chancellor, Chris Grayling tells MP the government will accept the two drafting amendments to the bill in the House of Lords.

One makes it clear that a body or individual who takes a slapdash approach to safety on a particular occasion cannot escape liability merely by pointing to a previously unblemished health and safety record. The second clarifies the definition of heroic action.

Bill passed

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs unanimously pass the Armed Forces (Service Complaints and Financial Assistance) Bill at second reading.

Worldwide 'precedent'

House of Commons

Parliament

Defence Committee Chairman Rory Stewart says that if the government finds a way of incorporating his committee's recommendations, then the government have an "opportunity to set a precedent for the world".

"This is an unbelievably complex area of legislation," he warns MPs and calls on the government to be "clear and precise about resolving the reality of the military justice system, keeping in mind the concerns of the [human and civil rights] community".

'Defective legislation'

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour home affairs spokeswoman Baroness Smith of Basildon says there has not been a full debate on communications data retention proposals, despite a previous Labour call for one.

She claims that today's amendments to the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill are "based on the ones we have so heavily criticised".

She jokes that asking peers to support them would be a rare case of "the House of Lords being asked to pass defective legislation so the House of Commons can sort it out".

'Just wasting time'

House of Commons

Parliament

A Labour member of the Defence Committee, Madeleine Moon, suggests that if today's bill cannot solve the problems raised by the UK's first Service Complaints Commissioner, Dr Susan Atkins, then MPs are "just wasting [their] time".

Dr Atkins has found in a

series of reports that there is a lack of confidence in the current Ombudsman system, a lack of accurate data on allegations of discrimination and "chronic delays that riddle the system from beginning to end".

The recommendations put forward by her committee would help stamp these problems out, she argues, and calls on the government to accept the changes.

Madeleine Moon
BBC

'Thoroughly flawed'

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative peer Lord Blencathra, who chaired the Joint Select Committee which examined the Draft Communications Data Bill, pays tribute to the experience of the peers backing the communications data amendments.

But, he says, "I respectfully suggest they are wrong".

Lord Blencathra - the former home Office minister David Maclean - says "the bill must be redrafted" and calls today's amendments "thoroughly flawed".

Lord Blencathra
BBC

2% pledge

House of Commons

Parliament

Supporting the bill, former chairman of the Defence Committee James Arbuthnot laments that "not one single party" is committed to spending 2% of GDP on the armed forces.

As the economy recovers, it is vital for the UK that the armed forces "must share in that recovery", he says.

James Arbuthnot
BBC

Armed Forces Covenant

House of Commons

Parliament

The bill will also put the

Armed Forces Covenant - also known as the military covenant - on a statutory footing for the first time.

This will require the defence secretary to produce an annual report on the position of healthcare, education and accommodation of armed services personnel.

'Art of the preposterous'

House of Lords

Parliament

Former Met Police commissioner Lord Blair of Boughton, who backs the amendments on the retention of communications data, alleges that politics has changed from "the art of the possible" to "the art of the preposterous".

He says the Communications Data Bill had "a Labour birth" and was "Conservative-supported".

However, he claims, "the Conservative and Labour parties are now prepared to do precisely nothing".

He describes himself as "acutely disappointed" and calls on both parties to bring forward legislation on communications data.

'Nothing to fear'

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow defence minister Kevan Jones contends that the armed forces "chain of command" have "nothing to fear" from this bill.

Mr Jones, who was a defence minister under the previous Labour government, had warned in an earlier intervention that senior armed forces personnel tend to be "naturally resistant to change" in his experience.

More powers for ombudsman

House of Commons

Parliament

The Defence Committee argues that the Armed Forces Bill does not go far enough.

In its

report on the bill, the committee called for more powers to be given the new Service Complaints Ombudsman, including allowing the Ombudsman to initiate thematic reviews.

Draft Communications Data Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

The Draft Communications Data Bill would have extended the range of data which communications companies have to store for 12 months.

It would have included, for the first time, details of messages sent on social media, webmail, voice calls over the internet and gaming, in addition to emails and phone calls. Officials would not have been able to see the content of the messages without a warrant.

The bill, dubbed the "snoopers' charter" by critics,

was blocked by the Lib Dems.

The amendments before the Lords today would add sections from the failed bill to the Counter-Terrorism Bill.

'Exceptional opportunity'

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord King said he understands that "both the government and the opposition will oppose these amendments".

He believes that this means the House will not take "an exceptional opportunity" to reduce the terrorist threat.

The amendments are also backed by Lib Dem peer Lord Carlile - the former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation - Labour peer and former counter-terrorism minister Lord West, and crossbencher and former Metropolitan Police commissioner Lord Blair.

Lord King
BBC

'Tighten' the bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Indicating that there may be some amendments to come at the later stages, shadow defence minister Kevan Jones tells MPs that this bill could enhance the armed services if it is "tightened up a bit".

Kevan Jones
BBC

Communications data

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord King of Bridgwater, a Conservative peer and former defence secretary, is reintroducing amendments on the retention of communications data.

Lord King was one of four peers who tried to push through measures from the Communications Data Bill, rejected in 2012, and add them to the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill at committee stage last month.

They withdrew the amendments at committee stage while they waited for a new draft of the proposals from the government.

'See the light'

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher Lord Brown of Eaton-under-Heywood, who tabled the amendment, says he continues to back an increased role of the courts in TPIMs decisions.

"We're all against terrorism, but we're all also - I hope - in favour of human rights," he says.

He does not push the amendment to a vote but says he hopes ministers might "see the light", though Home Office Minister Lord Bates insists the government's position will not change.

Right 'not to be murdered'

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Howard has support from another former minister, Lord Tebbit.

The Conservative peer - whose wife Margaret was severely injured by an IRA bomb in 1984 - tells the House he has lost five friends who have been "murdered by terrorists".

He says he is "bored and irritated" by some of the arguments around the bill, which he wants to see passed as soon as possible.

He argues that the ultimate right is the right "not to be murdered".

Lord Tebbit
BBC

'Protecting the people'

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Howard of Lympne - a former Conservative leader and home secretary - rises to oppose an amendment adding more judicial oversight to the procedure for TPIMs.

Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures (TPIMs) allow the authorities to force suspects to move to another part of the country.

Lord Howard argues that the decision "should be made by the secretary of state and not by the courts".

That is because the home secretary is responsible "for protecting the people" and accountable to the electorate, he argues.

Lord Howard
BBC

More on TEOs

House of Lords

Parliament

The bill requires four conditions to be met before the home secretary can sign a temporary exclusion order.

One condition of a TEO is that its use is considered necessary to protect the public from the risk of terrorism.

For a TEO to be signed, an individual must have the right to reside in the UK but be abroad at the time of the TEO, and the home secretary must also reasonably suspect the individual of being involved in terrorist-related activity.

TEOs have been criticised for proposing the removal of someone's rights without them being convicted of a crime.

'Doing the right thing'

House of Commons

Parliament

Anna Soubry
BBC

Defence Minister Anna Soubry tells MPs this bill is about making sure "we continue to do the right thing by our armed forces personnel" through improving the system of handling complaints in the armed forces and ensuring "we provide funding to organisations that support the armed forces community wherever they're based".

'Sensitive information'

House of Lords

Parliament

Home Office Minister Lord Bates says it is "important" that someone issued with a TEO is given a reason why "as soon as possible".

However, for security reasons "sensitive information" cannot be disclosed in some cases, he argues.

Armed Forces Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

After an extended points of order session, MPs now move to the second reading of the Armed Forces (Service Complaints and Financial Assistance) Bill, which aims to transform the existing Service Complaints Commissioner into a new Service Complaints Ombudsman.

The second reading is the first time the bill itself is debated in the House and discussion is limited to the principles of the bill, rather than the details of its clauses.

Temporary exclusion orders

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Hamwee is back with another amendment, requiring an explanation of the reasons why someone has been issued with a temporary exclusion order (TEO).

By signing a TEO, the home secretary could ban a suspected extremist from returning to the UK for up to two years.

The suspected extremist could only return to the UK if they complied with a monitoring arrangement.