Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. MPs began the day at 9.30am with questions to Energy and Climate Change Secretary Ed Davey.
  2. Following that, Leader of the House William Hague set out the upcoming business in the House of Commons.
  3. MPs took part in two backbench business debates: the first on building sustainable GP services, then on improving cancer outcomes.
  4. The day finished with an adjournment debate on beer duty.
  5. Peers met at 11.30 GMT and, after oral questions, debated the Pension Schemes Bill at third reading.
  6. Peers then turned to the Deregulation Bill for the second day of report stage scrutiny.
  7. There was also a short debate on improvement of maternity care and training of maternity staff.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

Goodnight

House of Lords

Parliament

That's the end of business in the Lords, and in Parliament, for today.

Peers will sit tomorrow from 10:00 GMT to debate private members' bills, beginning with the International Development (Official Development Assistance Target) Bill.

'Tidying up exercise'

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town introduces an amendment to allow the

Council for Licensed Conveyancers to regulate for example, probate lawyers without them having to qualify and be regulated in conveyancing.

She describes the amendment as a "tidying up exercise".

Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town
BBC

End of Commons business

House of Commons

Parliament

And that brings an end to today's business in the House of Commons.

MPs will be back at 14.30 GMT on Monday 9 February.

Stay with us as peers continue their report stage scrutiny of the Deregulation Bill.

@agriffithsmp

Conservative MP Andrew Griffiths tweets: .@almurray & I are united in our love of Great British beer! Best beer in the world! ‏

Government wins the vote

House of Lords

Parliament

The government wins this division by 36 votes.

Peers reject Baroness Meacher's amendment by 163 votes to 127.

Thriving pubs

House of Commons

Parliament

Bringing her remarks to a close, Ms Patel argues cuts to beer duty and reduced restrictions on playing live music have allowed "British pub to thrive" under this government.

In vino veritas

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative chair of the all party group on wine, Tim Loughton, intervenes to make the case for extra support for the wine industry, which he says accounts for 22% of sales in pubs.

He offers Ms Patel a bottle of English wine if she includes wine in any "happy hour" deals the Treasury may be planning for beer.

Tim Loughton
BBC

Division on social work amendment

House of Lords

Parliament

The House divides on the amendment requiring Parliament to approve a change in the regulation of providers of social work services and requiring the government to produce a risk assessment.

Economic case

House of Commons

Parliament

Responding to the debate, Exchequer Secretary Priti Patel notes that the brewing industry is a major part of the UK economy adding £22bn to the UK's GDP and supporting over 900,00 people in total including a "significant proportion" of young people.

Priti Patel
BBC

Social drinking

House of Commons

Parliament

Andrew Griffiths welcomes the

scrapping of the beer duty escalator - which adds inflation plus 2% to the price - in the 2013 budget, but calls for greater support for the beer brewing industry.

The way to support local communities is to support the beer industry as "it is beer that gets people into the pubs" he argues.

'No adequate case'

House of Lords

Parliament

The amendment, introduced by crossbencher Baroness Meacher, is backed by Labour peers Baroness Donaghy and Baroness Jones of Whitchurch.

Baroness Jones, a shadow education spokeswoman, claims the government "hasn't presented an adequate case" to say why changes are necessary.

She adds that child abuse is happening "on a scale we cannot fully comprehend".

'Protecting our children'

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher Baroness Howarth of Breckland is speaking in support of an amendment to a section of the bill concerning a reduction in regulation of providers of social work services.

The amendment would require Parliament to approve a regulation change and require the government to produce a risk assessment.

"If we are committed to truly protecting our children," she says, "we will take more time to evaluate whether this is the way forward."

Baroness Howarth says she is concerned for "the nation's most vulnerable children".

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative Andrew Griffiths, the chair of the all-party beer group, is now leading the adjournment debate on the beer duty.

Petition

House of Commons

Parliament

Leicester East MP Keith Vaz is presenting a petition to from his constituents on the lack of appropriate parking around Shree Sanatan Mandir Hindu temple in Leicester.

Cancer figures

House of Commons

Parliament

Closing the debate, Conservative MP John Baron uses his final speech to make the case for yearly cancer figures broken down by CCG to be published, so that results can be compared "and save the lives we all wish for".

More patients than ever

House of Commons

Parliament

Health Minister Jane Ellison responds to some of the claims made in today's debate.

Most waiting times for cancer treatments are maintained she tells MPs, while the NHS is treating more cancer patients than ever and "survival rates are improving", she says.

Drawing her remarks to a close she argues that the new NHS Cancer Task force is leading the way and "will make a real difference"; but agrees the health system must continue to be challenged, and thanks MPs for today's debate.

Jane Ellison
BBC

'For the next Parliament'

House of Lords

Parliament

Cabinet Office spokesman Lord Wallace of Saltaire says he recognises "popular local disillusion" in Bristol, but argues that the matter is a parliamentary one as well as a local one.

"It will be for the next Parliament to consider," he declares, and urges withdrawal of the amendment.

Baroness Janke agrees to withdraw but adds that she "does not believe it is something that will go away" and she will try to find another way "to take this forward".

Bristol referendum

House of Lords

Parliament

Liberal Democrat Baroness Janke, a city councillor in Bristol, is proposing an amendment on referendums on changing local authority governance systems.

"It is for the city of Bristol to decide what form of local government it wants to have," she argues.

Labour local government spokesman Lord McKenzie of Luton says Bristol is the only city unable to vote to abolish the office of elected mayor if it wished to, following a referendum vote to establish one.

"It does not seem right" that Bristol cannot reject the mayoral system, he claims.

Early diagnoses

House of Commons

Parliament

Responding for the government, Health Minister Jane Ellison points out that the Department of Health have invested over £450m to improve early diagnoses of cancer.

The project is working jointly with Cancer Research and Macmillan cancer support to find faster ways to diagnose cancers, especially rarer cancers or those with "difficult symptoms", she says.

Labour strategy

House of Commons

Parliament

Andrew Gwynne announces that Labour will publish a "cancer strategy" within six months of winning an election, with the aim of making the UK the "best in Europe on cancer".

Just over half of cancers are diagnosed at an early stage, but the new strategy will aim to raise this to two out of every three receiving an early diagnosis, followed by one week appointments.

This will be made possible new investment paid for by a levy on the tobacco industry, he explains.

Lottery licences

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative peer Lord Mancroft is introducing amendments to the mandatory conditions of lottery operating licences.

He proposes removing the cap on the size of jackpots in society lotteries, which currently stands at £40,000.

Lord Mancroft is president of the

Lotteries Council.

Lord Mancroft
BBC

'What more can be done'?

House of Commons

Parliament

Responding to the debate for Labour, shadow health minister Andrew Gwynne says that the death of his mother from ovarian cancer, when he was 19-years-old, has left him asking "what more can be done".

While cancer treatment has improved since then, progress has stalled, he claims, telling MPs that "cancer targets have been missed in the last three quarters" while the cancer treatment budget has been cut by £800m in real terms.

Andrew Gwynne
BBC

'For local authorities'

House of Lords

Parliament

Government spokesman Lord Gardiner of Kimble says that the matter of busking "is for local authorities to look at".

They can examine "the local circumstances and decide whether there is a problem".

'As much busking as possible'

House of Lords

Parliament

Backing the amendment, Conservative peer Lord Deben praises the UK capital but says it could do with even more buskers to cheer people up.

"London is the greatest city in the world," he says.

"It is the only world city. We are immensely lucky to live in this great city. We should be thrilled about that every day."

However, he adds: "This city needs as much busking as possible. There are some miserable places where more buskers will cheer us enormously."

'Powerful testimony'

House of Commons

Parliament

Fellow Conservative John Baron intervenes to thank Mr Lopresti for his bravery.

"There's nothing more powerful than hearing personal testimony," Mr Baron says.

Mr Lopresti's "key message" of improved communication "is terribly important" he adds.

New test

Scientists in Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic have

developed a simple blood test that could detect bowel cancer at the earliest possible stage.

The £20 test picks up on antibodies in the blood and, according to researchers, is more sensitive and accurate than existing tests.

Cancer survivor

House of Commons

Parliament

Bowel cancer survivor Jack Lopresti is on his feet to share his story with MPs.

Though praising the care he received, he tells MPs that during his treatment his hospital falsified a letter from him to end his chemotherapy early.

The experience "shattered" the confidence he'd had that he was getting straightforward treatment. "If they'd made a mistake on this, what else hadn't they discovered?" he asks.

Pausing briefly to regain his composure Mr Lopresti, who has since received a "all clear" diagnosis, says he had "very lucky escape".

Jack Lopresti
BBC

Busking deregulation

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Clement-Jones is now introducing an amendment to deregulate busking.

He dismisses claims that the police need powers to deal with "busking-related offences".

The Lib Dem peer asks: "What are these? Three-card trick artists on Westminster Bridge? Pickpockets in Covent Garden?"

He says such activities have nothing to do with busking.

'Defective' amendment

House of Lords

Parliament

Government spokesman Lord Gardiner of Kimble says payments between broadcasters should be examined in greater detail.

He says he is "sympathetic" to the intention of the amendment but it would not give ministers the powers to repeal section 73 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.

The act requires payments by public service broadcasters to cable companies to re-transit their programmes.

He views the amendment as "defective" but says the government will bring forward legislation to repeal section 73 at a later date.

Radiotherapy investment

House of Commons

Parliament

Taking part in his second debate of the day, Labour's Grahame Morris argues that greater investment in radiotherapy could save "thousands of lives."

He claims that cancer drugs only cure 2% of all cancers, yet the cancer drugs budget "consumes far larger proportion than radiotherapy because of the requirement to invest in infrastructure and staff".

Modern technology has made radiotherapy more effective but the UK has 'taken [its] eye off the ball" leading it to fall behind some developing countries in its treatment of cancer, he adds.

Earlier scans for brain tumours

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Rebecca Harris, chair of the all party group for brain tumours, is arguing for earlier brain scans for patients who display symptoms of tumour growth.

Because brain tumours are rare many doctors wrongly diagnose sufferers with migraines, denying them vital treatment at earlier stages, she tells MPs.

World cancer day

House of Commons

Parliament

World Cancer Day was held yesterday, on 4 February.

The campaign aims to take a positive and proactive approach to the fight against cancer "highlighting that solutions do exist across the continuum of cancer, and that they are within our reach".

Picture: Lord Clement-Jones

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Clement-Jones
BBC
Lord Clement-Jones stands to introduce his amendment

Ovarian cancer

House of Commons

Parliament

The next speaker, Labour's Sharon Hodgson, is using her speech to focus on

ovarian cancer.

She claims that less than 3% of women know all the symptoms of the cancer, of which around 7,100 women are diagnosed every year.

Deregulation Bill resumes

House of Lords

Parliament

Report stage on the Deregulation Bill resumes with an amendment from Lib Dem peer Lord Clement-Jones on broadcast copyright.

The amendment would repeal section 73 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (reception and re-transmission of wireless broadcast by cable).

It would enable ministers to cancel the fees paid to cable TV companies by public broadcasters for re-transmission of their channels.

Lord Clement-Jones argues the regulations date from the era of analogue broadcasting and are now outdated.

Patient experience

House of Commons

Parliament

Continuing his opening speech, Mr Baron criticises "unacceptable" widespread variations in patient experience based on geographical and social groups.

He says that although survival rates should be the priority, there should also be a greater focus on the patient experience of people with cancer, especially those with rarer cancers.

Adjourns

House of Lords

Parliament

The House of Lords now adjourns for 10 minutes until debate on the Deregulation Bill resumes.

@rcgp and @grahamemorris

RCGP ‏(Royal College of General Practioners) tweets: .@drdanpoulter agrees with @grahamemorris to look into incentives for directing new GPs to underdoctored areas #GPdebate

Grahame Morris MP ‏replies: .@rcgp @drdanpoulter : Probably first time ever! But on important issue of GP workforce planning.

Cancer risks

House of Commons

Parliament

Cancer Research UK

has released data predicting that cancer rates in the UK will rise to one in two people.

The previous forecast was that one in three people would be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetimes.

The charity has stated that longer life expectancies mean that more people will be affected.

Comparing statistics

House of Commons

Parliament

In the first intervention of the debate, the Conservative MP Sir Edward Leigh says it is time for an "open" debate on the provision of health services.

He notes that in France and Germany, where a social insurance system is in place, there are better cancer outcomes than in England.