Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. The day in the Commons began at 11.30 GMT with questions to the Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg.
  2. Following that, there was a statement on the situation in Ukraine, ahead of further peace talks this week in Minsk.
  3. The day's main business was debates on motions relating to the police grant report for England and Wales, and the local government finance reports.
  4. MPs then debated any amendments from the House of Lords to the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.
  5. Peers met at 14.30 GMT for oral questions; followed by the report stage of the Recall of MPs Bill.
  6. Peers also held a dinner break debate on local welfare assistance schemes.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

Goodnight

And that brings an end to today's proceedings in the Houses of Parliament.

Peers will be back tomorrow 15.00 GMT for the final day of report stage scrutiny of Deregulation Bill.

Wrong timeframe

House of Lords

Parliament

Government spokesman Lord Gardiner of Kimble argues against the five year timeframe as it "is not certain there will have been a recall petition in that time."

He adds that any review of an act that has not had a chance to operate would be "limited in its conclusions" and will not have the "use that [Lord Norton] intends."

Lord Norton withdraws his amendment, but encourages the government to "reflect" on the "vision" of his proposal.

Bill review

House of Lords

Parliament

Constitutional expert and Conservative peer Lord Norton of Louth moves an amendment to establish a review of the bill five years after it becomes law.

While he concedes a lot of this will be done by the usual post-legislative scrutiny of acts carried about by the houses of parliament, he argues a special case should be made as peers are "totally unclear what impact [the bill] might have".

Amendment defeated

House of Lords

Parliament

Angered by Lord Wallace's response, Baroness Hayter pushes the amendment to a vote, but it is ultimately defeated by 99 votes to 45, a government majority of 54.

'Compatible with campaigning'

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Wallace of Saltaire admits there is "potential problem here", but tells peers the recall regulations are drawn from rules governing referendum elections, where all donations over £500 have to be recorded.

These levels are "compatible with with the nature of campaigning", he adds.

Goodnight from the Commons

House of Commons

Parliament

That brings to an end a long day in the Commons.

MPs return from 11.30 GMT tomorrow. Prime minister David Cameron will face questions at noon.

There will also be two opposition day debates, on Labour's jobs guarantee and on tax avoidance.

Joining forces

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Lord Grocott points out that these amendments are drawing support from peers who have been divided on every other issue so far.

"That fact alone" ought to give "a little pause for thought to the government", he argues.

Philosophy in the House

House of Commons

Parliament

"Nothing great in the world has ever been accomplished without passion," says Transport Minister John Hayes, quoting German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel.

The minister praises Andy McDonald for making a passionate case for improving transport in the north east of England.

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

After a busy day in the Commons the final adjournment debate begins.

Labour MP Andy McDonald is making a speech on transport in Tees Valley.

He says that government plans for a "northern powerhouse" should include "all of the north" of England.

Andy McDonald
BBC

Recall donations

House of Lords

Parliament

After briefly adjourning, peers now return to the Recall of MPs Bill.

First: a series of Labour amendments to include donations to recall campaigns into the normal restrictions around donations to political parties.

Labour frontbencher Baroness Hayter says this will prevent "foreign donors from flooding a constituency with money that they would be banned from giving to political parties".

Baroness Hayter
BBC

Amendments approved

House of Commons

Parliament

The House approves all of the Lords amendments to the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

MPs are now presenting petitions from their constituents.

Picture: Yasmin Qureshi

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's Yasmin Qureshi criticises the Prevent strategy
BBC

'Suspect community'

House of Commons

Parliament

Another Labour MP, John McDonnell, argues that some Muslims feel that "the Muslim community is becoming a suspect community and that this legislation is targeted at them".

He says it is important to "engage at the local level".

Help in place

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Ahmad points out that there are other support schemes for benefit claimants, including "the benefit scheme as a whole, short-term benefit advances and budgeting loans."

Local authorities can already do exactly what peers are calling for this evening "which is help the most vulnerable households through welfare reform", he argues.

Prevent 'no panacea'

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Yasmin Qureshi argues that parliamentarians appear to think that "Prevent is going to be panacea" for preventing terrorism.

"It isn't," she claims, adding that she is concerned that the UK is "heading for a McCarthyite state".

Food poverty report

House of Lords

Parliament

Local Government Minister Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon thanks the Bishop of Truro for his role in leading the All-Parliamentary Inquiry into Hunger and Food Poverty in Britain

report published in December.

The report urged the Government to protect existing local welfare assistance schemes, claiming food bank referrals would increase if the schemes are not quickly reinstated.

'Wolves from the door'

House of Lords

Parliament

Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Bakewell of Hardington Mandeville says local welfare assistance schemes help keep the "wolves of hunger, need and want from the door."

People assisted are not "scroungers", she adds, but "desperate people with their backs against the wall", which is why she says it is "extremely concerning" that funding for local assistance schemes are coming to an end.

Creating 'social glue'

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative peer Baroness Jenkin of Kennington, who recently had to

apologise for saying "poor people don't know how to cook", argues that localising welfare assistance can help "create and nurture" the "glue" that holds society together

This "glue is no longer their in many instances" she tells peers, as she calls on the government to fund local authorities to deliver effective schemes.

Temporary exclusion orders

House of Commons

Parliament

David Hanson welcomes the addition of "judicial oversight" to the bill's provisions on temporary exclusion orders.

The government wants the power to "

temporarily disrupt the return to the UK of a British citizen suspected of involvement in terrorist activity abroad".

The House of Lords passed an amendment allowing for an individual subject to a temporary exclusion order to be able to apply to the court for a statutory review of the decision.

Opposition welcomes amendments

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow Home Office minister David Hanson welcomes the amendments made in the Lords.

He tells MPs that Labour believes "there is a threat, and it is one that needs to be managed and effectively managed".

David Hanson
BBC

Funding security

House of Lords

Parliament

The Bishop of Truro, the Rt. Rev Tim Thornton, tells peers that uncertainty over funding has caused some councils to restrict access to schemes, causing potential damage to local areas and increasing costs.

If local schemes are cut and vulnerable people have nowhere to turn "we are likely you see a number of additional and more expensive costs to the public purse", he argues.

Funding should be secured to enable councils to design schemes "to meet the needs of residents now and in the future".

Bishop of Truro
BBC

'Freedom of speech'

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are considering Lords amendments 1-39 together in this debate, including an amendment which would require higher and further education institutions to have particular regard to the duty to secure freedom of speech.

The bill as it originally stood envisaged that universities will be required to have policies on "extremist speakers", and that the home secretary's powers of direction would be exercisable where she considers that the university is failing to perform its new statutory duty.

Peers had argued that a duty to have regard for freedom of speech should exist alongside that.

Theresa May says the government accepts the Lords amendment but adds that she thinks a university has a duty to be aware and to act "if students are being radicalised on their campus".

Picture: Theresa May

House of Commons

Parliament

Theresa May
BBC
Home Secretary Theresa May opens the debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill

End of funding

House of Lords

Parliament

Last month the Government announced it would no longer provide £180m of central funding to local welfare assistance schemes in England after April 2015.

Some poverty charities and councils have criticised the decision, saying it will leave low-income families at risk.

'For elected members'

House of Commons

Parliament

Home Secretary Theresa May says the bill has been given a great deal of scrutiny in the Lords.

SNP MP Pete Wishart intervenes to argue it is "for elected members" for scrutinise the bill rather than the Lords, which he calls "an affront to democracy".

Mrs May says elected MPs "now have the opportunity to consider those amendments".

She calls Mr Wishart's argument "completely false".

Dinner break debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers now take a dinner break, but some remain behind for a short debate on local welfare assistance schemes led by the Bishop of Truro.

Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are now considering Lords amendments in the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

Peers considered the bill yesterday and it now returns to the Commons. Both Houses have to agree the final text of the bill.

Council tax motion

House of Commons

Parliament

The Referendums Relating to Council Tax Increases (Principles) (England) Report 2015-16 is approved without a vote.

The government is offering a council tax freeze grant to those authorities that freeze their council tax in 2015-16.

Local authorities raising their council tax by 2% or more will have to hold a local referendum on the proposal.

Report approved

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs approve the local government finance report by 286 votes to 190 - a government majority of 96.

Testing to take place

House of Lords

Parliament

Following confirmation from the minister that the wording of the petition will be tested by groups including the Electoral Commission, Lord Kennedy of Southwark withdraws his amendment.

Testing the wording

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour Frontbencher Lord Kennedy of Southwark is moving an amendment to delete the wording of the bill to enable the wording of the petition to be properly tested by the Electoral Commission before it is agreed.

'Clear the lobbies!'

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs file into the division lobbies to vote on the Local Government Finance Report (England) 2015-16.

It sets out the grants to local authorities in England.

The government has said that councils would face an average cut in their spending power of 1.8% in 2015-16.

'Highest needs'

House of Commons

Parliament

Summing up for the government, Communities Minister Stephen Williams insists: "Councils with the highest needs and the highest demand for services still get the most funding."

Stephen Williams
BBC

'Cumulative impact'

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow local government minister Andy Sawford calls on ministers to "publish the cumulative impact of funding reductions on individual councils".

He claims there is "an attempt to disguise what's really happening".

"Those figures, if we had them, would expose the deep unfairness of the cuts," he adds.

Andy Sawford
BBC

Amendment withdrawn

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Campbell-Savours withdraws his amendment but points out that many peers are encouraging him to push his amendment to a vote.

Threatening a similar amendment at third reading, he calls on the government to come up with some form of compromise.

'Injustice for rural residents'

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Graham Stuart says Labour in government favoured urban areas.

He argues that if Labour forms the next government, there will be "further injustice" for "rural residents across England".

Graham Stuart
BBC

For the commons to decide

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town says tells peers the Commons - with Labour in support - has made its position on the length of suspension needed to trigger a recall clear.

It should be for the Commons to decide its rules, she says.

'Wholly discredited process'

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Campbell-Savours argues that the Common's Standards Committee needs the "flexibility" to hand down severe punishments to MPs without triggering recall proceedings.

Unless the suspension period is extended there will be an "excessive number of petitions and a wholly discredited process", he argues.

Under-debated amendment

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Campbell-Savours says a similar amendment in the House of Commons has not been properly debated.

"Only one MP I contacted knew of the amendments" while two members of the Standards and Privileges Committee voted for this measure, he says.

Suspension period

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers now turn to an amendment from Labour peer, and former MP, Lord Campbell-Savours to double the length of suspension from the House of Commons required to trigger a recall from 10 days to 20.