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Summary

  1. MPs met at 11:30am for Treasury Questions.
  2. The Justice Committee took evidence on restorative justice from victims groups and other interested parties.
  3. MPs on the Environment Committee investigated animal welfare.
  4. Later MPs completed report stage and third reading of the Bank of England and Financial Services Bill.
  5. After oral questions, peers examined Commons amendments to the Enterprise Bill, and the Trade Union Bill at report stage.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

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House adjourns

House of Commons

Parliament

The adjournment debate has come to an end, bringing to a close the day's business in the House of Commons.

MPs will return at 11.30am tomorrow for Northern Ireland questions, followed by prime minister's questions at noon.

Until then, good evening.

Fighting abroad 'extremely dangerous'

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Home Office Minister John Hayes thanks Robert Jenrick for making an "emphatic case" for why we should "broadcast clearly and powerfully that travelling abroad in uncertain circumstances is extremely dangerous".

Mr Hayes says that people who go out to fight with "the best of intentions" may find themselves fighting with organisations who may be fighting IS but "are themselves proscribed groups".

Home Affairs Committee chair Keith Vaz says that his concern is that people leaving the country on a British passport do not have their documents checked or recorded by immigration officers as they depart.

The minister responds that "if people have notified the local police that they may go abroad to fight and then no more has been done by that force, then that doesn't seem satisfactory".

John Hayes
BBC

UK citizens fighting abroad

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Robert Jenrick
BBC

Conservative MP Robert Jenrick has tabled today's adjournment debate on the treatment of UK citizens returning from fighting against the so-called Islamic State terrorist group, also known as Daesh.

The MP for Newark runs through the various conflicts where UK citizens have gone to fight in wars abroad, including the American civil war, the Spanish civil war, and in the Yugoslavian wars of the 1990s.

Mr Jenrick says that many hundreds of UK citizens have traveled abroad to fight in Syria and Iraq with Kurdish and militia forces against the IS group.

He says that the people he has met in this situation are "brave and good people who deserve fair treatment under the law", but says he believes that "we should be discouraging people" from going in the first place.

Interventions from the DUP's Jim Shannon and Conservative Rehman Chishti give different views on how people in this situation should be dealt with when they return to the UK, causing Mr Jenrick to say "their stories suggest that there is not a coherent policy".

Bill completes all stages in the Commons

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

The bill is passed at third reading by 298 votes to 237, a majority of 61.

That brings consideration of the bill in the House of Commons to an end and the legislation now returns to the House of Lords where peers will consider amendments made by MPs.

Conservative MP Gavin Williamson is now presenting a public petition on green belt land between Great Wyrley and Cheslyn Hay.

Division at third reading

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Speaker John Bercow brings the debate on third reading to an end and Labour and SNP MPs indicate their opposition to the legislation receiving third reading - it's final stage in the Commons.

So MPs walk through the lobbies to vote for the last time today.

The result of the division is expected at 6.45pm.

John Bercow
BBC

Bill 'fails the test'

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

SNP spokesperson George Kerevan joins the Labour frontbench in saying that his party will vote against the bill at third reading.

He says that the chancellor said in treasury questions this morning that the UK had "better and tougher" regulation of the financial system. "It's a good test of this bill - do we have better and tougher regulation now?" he asks.

Going back to the issue of the removal of the presumption of responsibility for senior managers in financial misconduct in large organisations, Mr Kerevan says "if we pass this bill tonight - culpable managers will no longer be personally responsible".

"So on that test the bill fails".

End of the day in the Lords

Trade Union Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

House of Lords clock
BBC

Baroness Morgan of Ely withdraws her amendment, and the final two amendments on today's order paper are not moved so it's a very early bath for the House of Lords tonight. 

After almost 3 hours and 45 minutes of legislating, they're gone for the day.

Government has 'failed to learn lessons'

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow Treasury Minister Richard Burgon is slightly less complimentary in his remarks on the bill.

Mr Burgon says "righting the wrongs of the 2008 banker's crisis is an important task for any responsible government, but today the banker's chancellor is threatening to set back this task".

The shadow minister says that although Labour support some of the measures in the bill, they are "disappointed" with the "missed opportunities" to address issues in the sector.

The new settlement with the financial sector "seems to suggest the government has failed to learn the lessons of the 2008 banker's crisis", Mr Burgon says.

A legislative paean

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Harriett Baldwin is giving her last introduction to the bill in the House of Commons and thanks MPs for "a very good level of interest by members on all sides of the House".

She also says there have been "a wealth of recommendations - some of which have made their way into the bill".

The economic secretary to the treasury says "the bill brings the Bank of England more up to date as an institution and in doing so should greatly improve the scope for making it accountable to parliament and to the public".

Harriett Baldwin
BBC

Government must 'respect' devolution

Trade Union Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Morgan of Ely
BBC
Baroness Morgan with a copy of Labour's manifesto for Wales

Labour frontbencher Baroness Morgan of Ely is speaking on an amendment that was meant to exempt the Welsh public sector from provisions in this bill, but due to earlier concessions on "check-off" is not now necessary.

She brandishes Labour's manifesto for the upcoming Welsh Assembly election, in which the party promises to "repeal sections of the UK government's regressive trade union legislation in devolved areas". 

This will now not be necessary, she adds, because the government has allowed "check-off" for union dues to continue if both employer and trade union agree to it.

She says that "had these issues been perused, the Welsh government would have taken steps to overturn a measure which it believes is in its remit".

She says she hopes that in future the government will "respect its own policies" on devolution, and will "not attempt to legislate on devolved matters".

Labour's Lord Hain adds that the Welsh Government had taken "strong legal advice" that it would probably win on the matter if it had gone to the Supreme Court.

Bill moves on to third reading

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs reject Amendment by 301 votes to 239, a majority of 62 - it seems we will have to wait a little longer to see Shirley Bassey on a fiver.

Report stage has now come to an end, and the bill proceeds to its final stage - third reading. 

Division!

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Economic Secretary to the Treasury Harriett Baldwin says that the government will not be supporting the amendment. 

Musing on why the amendment has been submitted, she tells MPs: "you would think there was an election coming up in Wales".

"The Bank of England has already announced that future notes, starting with the new five pound note in September 2016, will feature symbols that represent all four home nations", she adds.  

Despite this assurance, Labour and Plaid Cymru MPs push amendment 4 to a vote - the result is expected shortly. 

Government expresses support for employee engagement...but not in law

Trade Union Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe says she's "very grateful" that Baroness Prosser has proposed this amendment.

She says in her time in business she's seen the benefits of employee engagement. But she says she disagrees with taking a prescriptive approach to promoting employee engagement, which is what the amendment advocates.

Her department, she says, is happy to help encourage companies to engage better with employees without setting it down in law.

Baroness Prosser says she'll withdraw her amendment.

Fairness for Wales

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Jonathan Edwards says that Wales is the only part of the UK that does not have its own national bank notes.

The Plaid Cymru MP says that the amendment seeks to allow Lloyd Banking group to issue Welsh bank notes  - and points out that this banking group is part owned by UK, including Welsh, taxpayers. 

Mr Edwards says that it would be a "welcome boost to brand Wales and recognise our country as an equal and an economic entity".

"Is it not fair and sensible that us in Wales be allowed to recognise our historic landmarks and our historic figures?" Mr Edwards asks. 

Jonathan Edwards
BBC

Who could be on a Welsh bank note?

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

As might have been guessed, the collection of Welsh MPs present in the chamber to support this amendment have been intervening on Mr Edwards to suggest famous sons and daughters of Wales who come from their constituencies to be on Welsh bank notes.

Aneurin Bevan, Leo Abse, and Shirley Bassey have all been suggested so far.

Other suggestions welcome...

Who else?

Parliamentary reporters tweet

Welsh bank notes

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Amendment 8 has been defeated by 300 votes to 246, a majority of 54.

The debate now moves on to the last group of amendments which relate to Wales being able to issue its own distinctive bank notes.

Plaid Cymru MP Jonathan Edwards says that it was "a very nice surprise" this morning when he heard that the Labour frontbench was supporting his amendment.

'What's not to like?'

Trade Union Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

The amendments on the role of the Certification Officer are agreed to, and peers move to Labour's Baroness Prosser's amendment 31F.

This amendment would introduce codes of practice for the purpose of improving industrial relations and encouraging employers to enable effective employee engagement.  

Baroness Prosser cites reports that demonstrate a link between employee engagement and improved productivity.

"What's not to like?" she asks.

Baroness Prosser
HOL

Clear the lobby!

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

New clause 14 has been defeated by 299 votes to 245, a majority of 54.

MPs have divided straight away on the next contentious proposal in this group - amendment 8, which relates to misconduct proceedings against senior managers by the Financial Conduct Authority.

Division result
BBC

Further concessions

Trade Union Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Lord Collins of Highbury asks for evidence that the Certification Officer's role needs changing.

He worries that ministers are not only changing the role of the officer but "politicising it".

Baroness Neville-Rolfe argues that trade unions do break the law and the bill provides "proportionate regulation" to deal with this.  

However she offers a concession in the form of amendment 23A which states that the Certification Officer must have "reasonable grounds to suspect" a trade union has failed to comply with obligations before carrying out an investigation. 

She also proposes that trade unions would not have to bear the full cost of external investigators.

Lord Collins of Highbury
HOL

Division in the Commons

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have divided to vote on Labour's new clause 14 to the Bank of England and Financial Services Bill at report stage.

New clause 14 would mean that financial regulators would have to produce an annual review for presentation to the Treasury into abusive tax avoidance.

The result of the division is expected at 5.20pm.

Another angle

The Guardian's political editor tweets

Reverse burden of proof

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Harriett Baldwin turns to the issue of the reverse burden of proof in senior manager's regime in the bill.

Ms Baldwin says that the government rejects the amendments relating to this issue "above all because the senior managers and certification regime will be an extremely effective tool in holding senior managers to account".

She says that under new provisions "senior managers will not be able to wriggle out of responsibility" when there has been misconduct.

The minister says that the reverse burden of proof "does not needed to introduce what we want to achieve - a culture change".

Harriett Baldwin
BBC

Government accepts new clause 9

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Harriett Baldwin rises once more to answer the points raised by members in the debate on this group of amendments.

She says that the government support and accept Charles Walker's new clause 9 relating to politically exposed persons, saying it introduces "an effective, proportionate, and commensurate approach to politically exposed persons".

The role of the Certification Officer

Trade Union Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers now move on to a group of amendments which address the role of the Certification Officer.

The Certification Officer (CO) is an independent officer who oversees administrative matters relating to trade unions.

The government are seeking to give the CO further investigatory powers and the ability to impose financial penalties of up to £20,000.

The bill requires trade unions to pay a levy to cover the CO's additional responsibilities.

'An unwelcome, unnecessary, and risky change'

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Richard Burgon sums up the debate on these amendments from the Labour frontbench and joins George Kerevan and the SNP in raising concerns over the removal of presumption of responsibility from senior financial managers, calling it an "unwelcome, unnecessary, and risky change".

The shadow Treasury minister reminds the House that this legislation was only brought in by the chancellor in 2013 and was due to come into force in March this year - "it is yet to even be tested", he says.

"Now is not the time to make this concession to top bankers."

What is check-off?

Trade Union Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Check-off is a system whereby union membership payments are deducted from union members' salaries by their employers and paid over to unions.

Ministers had called the process "outdated" and said it would save more than £6m a year by cutting public sector employers' administration.

In 2015 Cabinet Office Minister Matthew Hancock said that "in the 21st century era of direct debits and digital payments, public resources should not be used to support the collection of trade union subscriptions".

However the unions described the removal of check-off as "a vindictive political attack".

Read more from the government website's advice to employers.

Sending out the 'wrong signals'

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

George Kerevan
BBC

SNP member George Kerevan says that although there is "much in this bill to commend", he has reservations over what he calls the "attempt by government to shift legislation that it put in place only four years ago on the reverse burden of proof for major financial infractions".

Mr Kerevan says this legislation was put in place to "identify senior managers in major financial organisations" to ensure that if "some serious infraction of regulatory rules was encountered" they would be held responsible automatically, unless they could show they had acted adequately to stop it happening.

He says the law was "put there with a great deal of public support and support within this House to ensure that the financial sector at the highest levels was held responsible for any crises".

"This change sends out all the wrong signals," he says

What is a politically exposed person?

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

The Financial Action Task Force (FATF) is an inter-governmental body with responsibility for bringing in measures for combating money laundering, terrorist financing and other related threats to the integrity of the international financial system.

The FATF define a politically exposed person (PEP) as:

An individual who is or has been entrusted with a prominent public function. Due to their position and influence, it is recognised that many PEPs are in positions that potentially can be abused for the purpose of committing money laundering offences and related predicate offences, including corruption and bribery, as well as conducting activity related to terrorist financing."

Concession welcomed

TUC tweets

'What the House of Lords is best at'

Trade Union Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

A number of Conservative peers stand up to welcome the government's concession. 

Lord Balfe tells peers that he is delighted to tear up a speech he was going to make. 

Lord Cormack, a sponsor of the amendment, offers "unstinting admiration" to ministers for reacting to peers' objections.

Lord Deben believes that the debate demonstrates "what the House of Lords is best at - not thinking about the politics but about how legislation affects people".

House of Lords
HOL

Protecting rights

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative Charles Walker says that "without the protections and guidance within his new clause 9 we could see ex-Army officers, ex-trade unionists, ex-judges and former members of parliament denied the opportunity to serve on charitable and company boards because their presence on those boards would confer the status of politically exposed person on the rest of the board".

The MP for Broxbourne says that this is "a status that is best avoided by individuals" as he says it could lead to "a withdrawal of the relevant company or charities banking services by its bank". 

Mr Walker also says that his new clause is "about protecting the banking and future employment rights of the thousands of people" affected by this bill.

"It not only protects their rights but the rights of their extended families," he says.

Charles Walker
BBC

'Cannons to the right, cannons to the left'

Trade Union Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Government spokesman Lord Bridges of Headley opens the debate by sharing a lesson he has learnt in his time in the House of Lords:

"When ministers face cannons to the left of them, cannons to the right of them and cannons in front of them, it is usually best to pause and ask why."

He continues: "Uncomfortable though this may be, it is nothing like as uncomfortable as charging on."

He therefore says the government will support the principles behind Lord Balfe's amendment. 

Lord Bridges of Headley
HOL

Trade Union Bill debate begins

House of Lords

Parliament

With all Commons amendments to the Enterprise Bill agreed to, business now moves on to the Trade Union Bill which seems unlikely to elicit similar levels of consensus. 

We begin with amendment 21 which deals with the issue of check-off - a system whereby union membership payments are deducted from union members' salaries by their employers and paid over to unions.  

The amendment tabled by Conservative Lord Balfe argues that check off should be allowed if agreement exists between the employer and the trade union.

Trade Union Congress headquarters
BBC
Trade Union Congress headquarters

SNP amendment defeated

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Division result announcement
BBC

The SNP's New Clause 2 is defeated by 303 votes to 246.

The Commons moves on to considering Conservative MP Charles Walker's New Clause 9, on the effect that European Union anti-money laundering measures have inadvertently had on the ability of people considered "politically exposed persons" to access credit and banking services.

Rousing victory

Parliamentary reporters tweet

Opposition 'delighted'

Enterprise Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Lord Stevenson says he is "delighted" that the government has conceded these small but important amendments on Sunday trading.

Crossbencher Lord Alton of Liverpool worries that the changes "merely tinker" around the edges and believes the protections need to be strengthened.

Nevertheless the set of amendments pass unopposed. 

Lord Alton of Liverpool
HOL

All in a day's work

SNP MP tweets

MPs divide on 'balanced' national representation at Bank of England

Bank of England and Financial Services Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are voting on the SNP's proposed New Clause 2 to the bill. 

The new clause would make the Chancellor "have regard to the importance of ensuring a balanced representation from the nations and regions of the United Kingdom" when making appointments to the Court of the Bank of England.

Sunday trading

Enterprise Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers now turn to the issue of Sunday trading. Baroness Neville-Rolfe confirms that the government is no longer seeking to devolve powers on Sunday trading following defeat on the issue in the Commons.

She tells peers that the Commons amendments are designed to strengthen workers' rights in regards to Sunday trading by:

  • Shortening the notice period for opting out of Sunday work in the case of shop workers at large shops
  • Giving shop workers the right to object to additional working hours on Sunday
  • Requiring employers to give statements explaining these rights
  • Introducing fines for employers who fail to give explanatory statements.

Opening times
PA