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Summary

  1. MPs met at 11:30am for Northern Ireland Questions, followed by Prime Minister's questions at midday.
  2. The House of Commons considered amendments to the Energy Bill made in the House of Lords.
  3. Later MPs debated whether atrocities carried out by so-called Islamic State should be recognised as genocide.
  4. This afternoon the Commons Treasury Committee heard from key figures in the Vote Leave and Leave.EU organisations.
  5. After questions, peers continued scrutiny of the Housing and Planning Bill at report stage.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

Get involved

Peers adjourn

House of Lords

Parliament

And that brings the day in the House of Lords to an end.

Join us tomorrow when peers will be debating the Northern Ireland Bill and a report on the BBC.

House of Lords clock
HOL

'A bureaucratic nightmare'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative Lord True's amendment seeks to remove Clause 142. The clause allows the government to appoint a person to help resolve outstanding planning issues.

Lord Shipley supports the amendment arguing that the clause creates more bureaucracy when what is needed is proper resources for local planning authorities.

Labour's Lord Beecham is also supportive arguing that the clause creates "a bureaucratic nightmare".

Baroness Williams defends the measure insisting that it would only be used as a last resort.

Opposition peers are unconvinced and push the amendment to a vote.

The amendment is rejected 101 votes to 5. 

Lord True
HOL

Peers vote on cost recovery

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Kennedy moves his amendment 116BA which states that local planning authorities should be allowed to recover full costs in determining planning applications. 

He notes that this differs from an earlier amendment in that it sets "a more realistic fee level". He argues that such as fee level would not deter house building.

Baroness Williams refers to her previous comments on government proposals to ease resource pressures in local authority departments and hopes the amendment will be withdrawn.

It is not withdrawn and peers vote on the amendment where it is rejected 19 votes to 116.

Division result announcement
HOL
Division result announcement

Evening Standard splash?

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Lord Dubs now speaks to his amendments which gives local planning authorities greater powers to refuse planning permission for the construction of basements or "subterranean development".

Baroness Williams of Trafford tells peers that in the light of concerns the government will carry out a review of planning law relating to basement developments.

She adds "He [Lord Dubs] did promise me I'd be splashed all over the Evening Standard for this. I await his side of the deal."

Lord Dubs welcomes "this very happy occasion" and while he can't guarantee that she will be headlined in the Evening Standard "She jolly well ought to be."

Lord Dubs
HOL

Peers vote on planning application costs

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Gardner of Parkes
HOL

Peers now turn to amendment 108 which would allow local authorities to recover fees incurred whilst dealing with planning applications.

Conservative peer Baroness Gardner of Parkes argues that fees should be related to the size of the project. She points out that similar fees are applied whether someone is doing work in their own home or when a company is building a multi-million pound development. 

Government Minister Baroness Williams of Trafford worries that the amendment contains no protections or safe guards and could lead to a substantial increase in fees for those putting in planning applications.

The amendment is pushed to a vote but is rejected 129 votes to 36.

'The first clothes moth of Spring'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative Lord Lucas now rises and informs peers that he has just seen the first clothes moth of Spring. 

He expresses the hope that the warming in the weather will be mirrored by a warming in the Minister's attitude towards amendments.

His amendment allows local authorities to ask for the disapplication of planning legislation if it can be demonstrated that such a move would increase housing delivery in the authority's area. 

Crossbencher Lord Kerslake calls the amendment an "original, positive and localist approach".

Labour's Lord Beecham however is ambivalent, believing that more detail of the practicalities is needed.

Baroness Williams says she is willing to accept the amendment for the time being subject to a consideration of technical details.

The amendment is therefore agreed to.

Lord Lucas
HOL

'Identikit and alienating developments'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers return to the Housing and Planning Bill and amendment 107ZE. The amendment calls for local planning authorities to consider sustainable development and good design when considering new housing projects.

Labour's Baroness Andrews explains that her amendment aims to avoid "identikit and alienating developments". 

Baroness Williams agrees with the principle but believes the amendment is unnecessary as local planning authorities already have to pay regard to sustainability and design.

Cube houses in Rotterdam
BBC
Cube houses in Rotterdam

'A proud and vibrant racing industry

Horserace betting debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Lord Collins praises the racing industry for helping to build a "sustainable rural economy".

He welcomes the government's efforts to find a new funding model and seeks assurance that the government will meet its deadline of introducing a new model by April 2017.

Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe assures peers that the government is on track to meet its deadline. 

She expresses the hope that the new funding model will ensure "a proud and vibrant racing industry producing world class racing for generations to come".

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
HOL

'Racing depends on the health of the horses'

Horserace betting debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher Lord Trees argues that the continuation of the levy is essential, listing a number of veterinary advances it has funded.

He points to better recognition of micro-fractures enabling horses to be retired before the possibility of serious injury during a race.

He also notes major advances in infectious disease control.

He concludes: "The health of racing depends on the health of the horses on which it relies."

'Tears in the European Court'

Horserace betting debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Baroness Mallalieu welcomes the government's decision to find a new funding mechanism to finance the horseracing industry.

However she urges caution remembering that the last time an attempt was made to change the levy "it ended in tears in the European Court".

"We want to avoid that at all costs."

Baroness Mallalieu
HOL

House adjourns

House of Commons

Parliament

The adjournment debate has come to a close and with that the day's business ends and MPs retire for the evening.

The Commons will begin tomorrow with Culture, Media and Sport questions at 9.30am.

The main business of the day will be a debate to mark the 90th birthday of the Queen.

For all that and more join us tomorrow - but until then, good night.

Decision 'a private matter'

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Housing minister Brandon Lewis begins by expressing his sympathy for the residents affected, saying that he has a special interest in the area "having gone to school just down the road".

Mr Lewis says that the initial sale of the properties to developers "is a private matter", but says that he is encouraged by the involvement of the housing charity Dolphin Living in the process and promises to do what he can to help get that "excellent charity" involved in the negotiations. 

"Increasing supply is the best way to increase quality, choice, and affordability to tenants," the minister argues.

Mr Lewis also lists several of the new laws and regulations that have been introduced to help target criminal and rogue landlords.

Brandon Lewis
BBC

Horserace betting debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Horses
ALL SPORT/Getty Images

Debate on the Housing Bill is temporarily paused for the dinner break business debate which today addresses changes to the Horserace Betting Levy.

The Horserace Betting Levy, collected from betting profits, goes towards improving horse breeds, advancing veterinary science and improving horseracing in general.

In 2014/15 the levy collected £60.1m.

The levy had been criticised for not extending to remote betting operators. Some also complain that demanding an annual agreement for the levy prevented long term planning.

In March 2016 the government said a new funding arrangement would be put in place by April 2017 following a period of consultation.

'A major change'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Kennedy, whose name is also on the amendment, calls "permission in principle" "a major change in how we approve developments".

He calls the notion that it is the planning process which holds back building new houses "complete nonsense".

Baroness Williams seeks to assure the House that the government "does want to get this right" and offers to bring forward changes at third reading.

This has the effect of mollifying the opposition and Labour withdraw their amendment.

Baroness Williams
HOL

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Stella Creasy is now leading the day's adjournment debate on the future of the Butterfields Estate in Walthamstow.

Ms Creasy says that although this is a specific case, "this story is not unique to Walthamstow".

This story, she says, is indicative of what is happening in the housing market around the country as "speculative developers, and letting and estate agents seek to maximise their gains with no thought for the consequences of exploiting people in this uncompetitive market".

The Walthamstow MP says that the new owners of the estate have started to post notices to quit to many residences.

Stella Creasy
BBC

'Deeply, deeply flawed'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Andrews now speaks to her amendment which seeks to remove a clause 136 in the bill.

The clause introduces "permission in principle" for developing land in England - this gives housing-led sites identified in brownfield registers, local and neighbourhood plans  "permission in principle" to be developed. 

Baroness Andrews argues that "permission in principle drives a wedge" through the whole planning process.

She worries that even if unanticipated problems occur the permission could not be overturned and calls the policy "illogical and deeply, deeply flawed".

Baroness Andrews
HOL

Vellum approved by MPs

Vellum debate

House of Commons

Parliament

The motion on Vellum has been approved by 117 votes to 38, a majority of 79.

That brings to an end the debate on vellum and now Conservative MP Jeremy Lefroy is presenting a public petition on pports pitches at Shugborough Hall, Staffordshire.

Division!

Vallum debate

House of Commons

Parliament

The motion is put to a vote and the House divides on whether to support the continued use of vellum to record Acts of Parliament.

The result of the division is expected at 7.15pm

'The best of the old with the best of the new'

Vellum debate

House of Commons

Parliament

The minister for the Cabinet Office Matthew Hancock says that today's debate demonstrates that the House of Commons deals with "both the large and the small".

He makes a long, enthused speech praising the symbolic importance of vellum and says that with advent of modern digital technology "let us combine the best of the old with the best of the new".

The minister concludes his remarks saying "on the perspective of symbolism, cost, and practicality we should continue this great and long tradition".

Matthew Hancock
BBC

Printing laws on goat skins

Vellum debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Melanie Onn
bbc

Shadow deputy leader of the House Melanie Onn is unimpressed with the debate topic, saying "anyone watching BBC Parliament today is going to be completely confused as to why this House is spending the best part of two hours debating whether to continue to keep spending £100,000 a year printing laws onto goat skins".

Ms Onn finishes her remarks to a growing cacophony of heckles from the pro-vellum MPs across the chamber.

"There was a greater need for vellum at the time of the Magna Carta but the surprise emergence of the 21st Century and of computers and of the internet since the 13th Century have somewhat diminished that need," she says.

BreakingGovernment defeat on 'housing led' development

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have voted for Labour's amendment on "housing led" development by 213 votes to 171.

Losing links with the past

Vellum debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Ranil Jayawardena speaks in support of the motion saying that "as our methods of documentation move into an increasingly digitised world we will gradually lose our ability to experience historical artifacts and immerse ourselves in the study of the past fully".

With the digitisation of records, Mr Jayawardena says, "we lose the tactile elegance, the timeless simplicity, and the physical permanence of record keeping".

Ranil Jayawardena
BBC

Peers vote on 'housing led' development

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Minister Baroness Williams of Trafford says the government "can't accept" the amendments presented by Labour.

She says the amendments would limit the type of developments that would be built, and says the government will make it clear that planning should favour "housing led" development in secondary legislation.

In response to a suggestion from Labour's Baroness Hollis that the government should simply put the preference for "housing led" development into the bill before it passes, Baroness Williams of Trafford answers that legal consultation about what "housing led" development would mean is ongoing. She asks that the amendments be withdrawn.

Lord Beecham expresses regret that the minister is "in such a tangle", which he suggests is because "she hasn't been properly advised". He says the "principle, at least" of housing led development should be in the bill. He puts his amendment to a vote.

'Westminster is not a museum'

Vellum debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Ronnie Cowan from the SNP explains why he is not supporting the motion this evening, saying that although he is sympathetic with the arguments made by some members. 

"Westminster is not a museum; it doesn't exist to propagate tradition for the sake of tradition.

"We are here to govern and pass laws," he says, arguing that "for too long this parliament has doggedly refused to join the 21st century".

'Contemptuous' debate

Vellum debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Paul Flynn
BBC

Labour's Paul Flynn joins the anti-vellum brigade in his usual bombastic style.

He says that people who have been affected by "the austerity being implemented mercilessly by that government over there" will look at parliament tonight "and laugh and say there they go again, out of touch, looking after themselves and wasting money".

Mr Flynn finishes as he began, saying "we have 3.7 million children in poverty but we are not talking about them tonight - but we have saved vellum. Contemptuous."

'Tradition is important'

Vellum debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MPs Sharon Hodgson and Roberta Blackman-Woods both speak in support of the use of vellum in recording Acts of Parliament. 

Ms Blackman-Woods says she feels tradition is important and tells the House that her support of vellum is strongly linked to the Lindsfarne Gospels which are "very close to her heart and constituency".

"Without vellum we simply would not have the Gospels with us today."

Conservative MP Rebecca Harris makes a tongue in cheek intervention on Ms Blackman-Woods, saying that the Queen's Speech should be "webcammed from her sitting room" to save money.

Labour pushes for 'housing led' development

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

The government amendments on intervention into local plans have been agreed to and the Lords moves on to a Labour amendment that aims to increase the amount of "housing led" development that receives planning permission.

Lord Beecham calls the current state of the bill "unacceptable" and says his party's amendments "simply enshrine in legislation what the government told us was the aim of the bill", to increase the amount of new housing that is built.

Lord Beecham
BBC

A voice of dissent

Vellum debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Sir Paul Beresford speaks against the motion from the midst of the seemingly pro-vellum audience for this debate.

Sir Paul says that "printing of Acts over the many years have shown progressive changes as technology has progressed; we have moved from parchment to vellum to paper - from handwriting to printing, which all now have a digital back up".

Sir Paul Beresford
BBC

Cummings: Conventional wisdom 'often wrong'

Select Committee

Parliament

Dominic Cummings says he stands by all the figures he has cited and says there is no evidence that Vote Leave are misrepresenting the facts - although he admits he would be concerned if anyone was handing out misleading leaflets in hospitals about the financial benefits of leaving the EU. He concludes by comparing the "conventional wisdom" in favour of EU membership with the establishment's support for German appeasement in the 1930s.

If you had asked this House, Whitehall and the City of London and the CBI in the 1930s what their policy was on the deterrence of Germany, you would also have had a very clear, almost unanimous conventional wisdom, conventional wisdom that turned out to be wrong. Conventional wisdoms that span all the elements of government and bureaucracies are very often wrong."

Tyrie presses witness on 'extraordinary claims'

Select Committee

Parliament

It looks as though Andrew Tyrie is finally bringing the mammoth session towards its conclusion. Summing up, he suggests Mr Cummings has made a number of "extraordinary claims" about the views of senior officials in the Bank of England and Whitehall as well as the activities of US bank Goldman Sachs. He urges Mr Cummings to provide corroborating evidence to prove that his assertions are "more than fantasy and scaremongering". 

Lords debate local development plans

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

The Lords now moves on to a pair of government amendments that would allow either the secretary of state for communities and local government, or the mayor of London, to produce a local development plan for an authority that does not have one.

Local authorities are obliged by law to produce a local development plan.

Cummings: Risks from staying outweigh leaving

Select Committee

Parliament

Dominic Cummings acknowledges there are risks involved in voting to leave the EU, but thinks the risks of staying are "much worse". The European project, he says, has been going "relentlessly in one direction since 1949" and those wanting to leave are simply saying we "want to go down a different path for our and your interests". But Mr Streeting says he has heard only superficial arguments for leaving that would be made "in the pub" and is worried that fears about the impact on business have been "casually dismissed".

The longevity of vellum

Vellum debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Magna Carta
BBC

James Gray is extolling the virtues of vellum and is giving a long list of the ancient texts that exist today because they are recorded on vellum.

"The Lindsfarne Gospel, the Doomsday Book, St John's Gospel - they can all be read today because they were recorded on vellum," he says.

Mr Gray says that if the Magna Carta - above - had been recorded on paper "it would have been lost about 1465 - sometime before the birth of King Henry VIII".

Government suffers defeat over planning changes

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have voted in favour of the amendment offering a limited right of appeal to parish councils and neighbourhood forums unhappy about new housing developments.

They'll now be allowed to appeal against new housing that conflicts with made or advanced neighbourhood plans.

Neighbourhood plans were established by the Coalition government to allow communities to set priorities for local development.

The result was 251 votes to 194.

Background briefing

Head of Parliament and Constitution Centre at Commons Library tweets

Cameron's future 'not my call'

Select Committee

Parliament

Labour's Wes Streeting asks Mr Cummings whether he believes David Cameron should remain as PM in the event of a vote to leave the EU. Mr Cummings has not been slow in coming forward today - criticising Brussels, Whitehall and Wall Street in equal measure - but for once he demurs saying it is "not my call". Mr Streeting is somewhat disappointed that Mr Cummings has chosen to "dodge that bullet". 

Asserting the rights of the Commons

Vellum debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP James Gray, who is leading the debate, says he is aware that the previous debate was an issue of very grave concern to humanity, but says this one is "nonetheless an important issue of symbolism".

Mr Gray says it is aimed at asserting the right of the House of Commons to have a say on the way that Acts of Parliament are recorded after the "unilateral decision of the House of Lords" to end the practice of recording them on vellum.

James Gray
BBC

Peers vote on neighbourhood planning

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Evans of Bowes Park says the government will not accept the amendment.

She argues that communities are already integral to the whole planning process.

She further asserts that as the views of community, including in neighbourhood plans, are taken into consideration, a right of appeal is not necessary.

Baroness Parminter calls the response disappointing and therefore pushes the issue to a vote.

'Grassroots of democracy'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative Lord Marlesford supports the amendment arguing that it is about supporting "the grassroots of democracy".

He believes the Conservative Party should be encouraging and listening to such organisations.

"There is no point in saying that they don't matter and that an outside developer can overrule local opinions."

Lord Marlesford
HOL