Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. MPs met at 2.30pm for Education questions, followed by an urgent question on shipbuilding on the Clyde.
  2. There were two statements: on junior doctors' industrial action and on BHS entering administration.
  3. Then it was on to consideration of Lords' amendments to the Immigration Bill.
  4. Peers began their day with questions, and then conducted third reading of the Trade Union Bill.
  5. The Housing and Planning Bill reached its fifth day of report stage.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Claire Gould

All times stated are UK

Get involved

pupils

The BBC News website examines key questions about academy schools and how they are different from mainstream schools.

Read more

House adjourns

House of Lords

Parliament

The message from the Commons to the Lords is delivered and received by bewigged parliamentary clerks and with that the House of Lords adjourns for the evening.

Peers will return tomorrow afternoon for oral questions at 2.30pm, followed by committee stage scrutiny of the Driving Instructors (Registration) Bill and legislative ping-pong on the Energy Bill and Immigration Bill as peers debate amendments made by MPs to their own amendments.

Until then - good night.

House of Lords
BBC

Order! Order!

House of Commons

Parliament

And that concludes business in the House of Commons.

Join us tomorrow when MPs will be debating House of Lords reform and the Policing and Crime Bill.

Business in the Commons kicks off at 11:30am with questions to the Justice Secretary.

House of Commons clock
HOC

Swayne: Long term aid helped emergency relief

Nepalese earthquake debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's Gareth Thomas raises concerns that a large amount of the money promised to Nepal by donors has not been received.

He calls on the UK government to stay with the Nepalese on their journey to reconstructing the country.

International Development Minister Desmond Swayne notes that "the one piece of international development effort that the popular press actually approves of is our relief for disasters in emergency".

However he argues that the aid given to Nepal over the years improved the relief effort when the disaster hit.

Desmond Swayne
HOC

Awaiting a message from the Commons

House of Lords

Parliament

The House of Lords has adjourned briefly while peers await a message from the Commons regarding votes tonight in that chamber where MPs have disagreed with Lords amendments to the Immigration Bill.

The end of report stage

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Williams of Trafford responds to the bill for the last time at report stage saying "we end report as we began - discussing the principle of many of the policies within the bill".

Speaking to the issues of process raised by Lord Lisvane and Baroness Hollis, the minister says she understands their concerns but argues that the amendments which have been tabled will "place delay upon delay on the building of new homes".

Lord Lisvane agrees to withdraw his amendment, saying "these amendments raise lessons for the future rather than a final skirmish at report stage".

'We have failed to scrutinise this bill'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Baroness Hollis of Heigham, who has been a vocal opponent of the bill, gives an impassioned speech against what she calls the "inadequate process" that has brought this bill forward.

Baroness Hollis says that in terms of process rather than content, "this is the worst bill I've come across in 25 years in this House".

She says there has not been proper pre-legislative scrutiny or legislative scrutiny and there will not be post-legislative scrutiny. 

Baroness Hollis lays no blame with the minister, who she says has been "very accommodating" but argues that the bill has been rushed through "a year too early".

She finishes by saying simply "we have failed to scrutinise this bill".

Baroness Hollis of Heigham
BBC

Adjournment Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's Gareth Thomas brings the day in the Commons to an end with an adjournment debate marking the first anniversary of the Nepal earthquake.

On 25 April 2015 a 7.8 magnitude quake hit Nepal's capital Kathmandu and surrounding areas.

More than 8,000 people were killed by the earthquake and in the 120 aftershocks which followed.

Very few of the estimated 800,000 buildings destroyed in the quake have been rebuilt.

Nepal earthquake
AP

'Accepting delay to get things right'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Lisvane
BBC

The former Clerk of the House of Commons Lord Lisvane is moving the last group of amendments for consideration at report stage for the Housing and Planning Bill.

Amendment 138 seeks to remove the immediate commencement date on provisions on vacant high value housing in the bill.

Lord Lisvane is lamenting the lack of draft bills being brought forward before legislation is brought before the House, saying "sometimes one must accept delay in order to get things right".

"Getting things right means following the logical process of formulating policy, consulting upon it, finalising it and then putting it into draft legislation with all the key areas of policy being on the face of the bill."

MPs reject Lords Amendment 59

Immigration Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs vote to disagree with Lords Amendment 59 by 303 votes to 60.

Speaker John Bercow then asks the House if they agree to all remaining Lords amendment which they do without a vote.

And that brings to an end the votes on the Immigration Bill.

House of Commons
HOC

MPs vote on asylum seekers' employment

Immigration Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

It's a carbon copy of the last result with MPs approving the motion to disagree with Lords Amendment 85 by 302 votes to 266.

Now MPs are voting on a motion to disagree with Lords Amendment 59.

This amendment permits unrestricted access to the labour market for asylum seekers in the UK if their asylum claim has been outstanding for 6 months or more, regardless of whether the delay is of their own making.

'The right to develop'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative peer Lord True has moved his amendment 128YE, which also has the support of the Labour frontbench

The amendment would give local planning authorities "the right to develop in the local interest" - namely the right to compulsory purchase, after a six-month period, land it deems unused or underused that is owned by public bodies such as government departments, transport providers etc.

Government minister Lord Bridges of Headley says that although he is sympathetic, the government thinks the power should sit with the secretary of state rather than with local authorities.

Lord True
BBC

Lords amendment rejected

Immigration Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have approved the motion to disagree with the Lords on imposing a limit on the detention periods 302 votes to 266 producing a majority of 36.

And another vote is called.

This vote is on a motion to disagree with Lords Amendment 85. The amendment would prohibit the detention for immigration purposes of pregnant women.  

Compulsory purchase amendments

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Viscount Younger of Leckie
BBC

Minister Viscount Younger of Leckie moves a substantial group of amendments relating to provisions on compulsory purchase orders in the bill. These are largely technical amendments with snappy designations such as amendment 128YAS and 128YCX.

There is no debate or division on the amendments in this group, as peers seem content to let them pass.

Viscount Younger of Leckie thanks peers for "hearing about 90 technical, and in places, rather arcane amendments about compulsory purchase".

New Dubs amendment

LabourLords tweet

Cries of shame

Buzzfeed Correspondent tweets

'Achieving quantity and quality'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

The co-signatory of the amendments seeking to extend powers in the New Towns Act to local authorities Lord Best rises to offer his support for the proposals.

He says "as we enter the final furlong for this bill's report stage I'm delighted we have positive amendments here to propel one really important way of achieving quantity and quality in the new homes which this country so badly needs and deserves". 

The amendments are passed unopposed.

MPs reject Lords amendment

Immigration Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted in favour of the motion (304 votes to 268) rejecting the Lords amendment which sought to change the rules concerning overseas domestic workers.

Another vote is immediately called. This one concerns Lord Amendment 84 which imposes a limit on the period of time a person can be detained.

MPs are voting on a motion to disagree with the amendment.

MPs vote on overseas domestic workers

Immigration Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs move swiftly on to vote on the motion disagreeing with the Lords Amendment 60.

Lord Amendment 60 would allow overseas domestic workers to change their employer whilst in the UK.

Overseas domestic workers are those who are admitted to the UK as domestic workers of overseas employers or diplomats.

Amendment 123 defeated

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have voted to reject amendment 123 by 35 votes to 152, a majority of 117.

The debate now turns to a number of government amendments that mean certain regulations in the bill have to be approved by both Houses of Parliament.

The other amendments in the group have been tabled by Lib Dem peer Lord Taylor of Goss Moor and Crossbencher Lord Best and relate to extending powers under the New Towns Act 1981 to local authorities to build new developments.

Minister Baroness Williams of Trafford has indicated government support for the New Towns Act amendments.

Lord Taylor of Goss Moor
BBC

Lord Dubs' amendment rejected

Immigration Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted in favour of the amendment to disagree with the Lords by 294 votes to 276.

This means Lord Dubs' move to require the government to take in unaccompanied refugee children from Europe has been rejected by MPs.

Labour wrecking amendment falls

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Amendment 122 has been defeated by 12 votes to 180, a majority of 168.

Not deterred by this thumping defeat on their wrecking amendment, the Labour frontbench now move amendment 123 which instead of wrecking the provisions in the bill that seek to introduce private sector competition to the planning application process - simply seeks to delete the entire clause from the bill.

The result of the division is expected at 9.40pm.

Division!

Immigration Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

The debate comes to an end and the amendment to disagree with the Lord Dubs amendment is pushed to a vote.

Lord Dubs' amendment would require the government to take in 3,000 unaccompanied refugee children from other countries in Europe.

The result is expected at 9:41pm.

House of COmmons division
HOC

'Deeply proud" of the government's record

Immigration Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Labor's Jo Cox says she is "deeply proud" of the government for "leading the way internationally" and providing humanitarian support.

However she says that "in the chaos" of the situation many thousands of children have been separated from their parents and are already in Europe.

She argues that the government's generosity has not extended to such children.

Jo Cox
HOC

Clear the bar!

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have divided to vote on Labour's amendment 122 to the Housing and Planning Bill at report stage.

The amendment would change the meaning of the provisions in the bill relating to private sector competition in the planning process so that only a local authority or public body could apply.

Future of the Dubs amendment

LabourLords tweet

Competition good for local government

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative peer and Local Government Association (LGA) chair Lord Porter of Spalding rises to thank the minister for listening to local government on this issue and says he is in favour of private sector competition "as I do honestly think it will drive fees up".

"This is the first time I can ever recall that private sector competition will drive up the cost of the service" he says.

Currently, Lord Porter says, about £150 million a year is being spent by taxpayers subsidising the planning system.

Lord Porter does not seem worried about the potential competition, saying "local government will win the competition hands down".

Lord Porter of Spalding
BBC

The Kindertransport

Immigration Bill

Yvette Cooper compares tonight's vote with the vote over 75 years ago on the Kindertransport.

You can read more about the Kindertransport here

Kindertransport Jewish refugees arrive in Britain
Getty Images
Kindertransport Jewish refugees arrive in Britain

MPs can 'protect the dignity and humanity of 3,000 children'

Immigration Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Yvette Cooper says the amendment is needed because there are so many children "disappearing, suffering and dying".

She tells MPs about reports of children being forced to engage in "survival sex" with traffickers - "This is modern slavery."

Today, she says, the House of Commons has an opportunity to "protect the dignity and humanity of 3,000 children". 

Yvette Cooper
HOC

Localism or Leninism?

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Beecham
BBC

Peers are currently debating a number of amendments that relate to the processing of planning applications by alternative providers other than a local planning authority.

Minister Baroness Evans of Bowes Park says that the government amendments in this group are designed to address issues that have been raised in earlier legislative stages by peers about introducing competition to the planning applications process.

Labour frontbench spokesperson Lord Beecham says the provisions in the bill show "the government's intention to extend its fetish of privatisation to the provision of planning services" and says that the way this has been done "seems uncannily more like Lenin's concept of democratic centralism than the localism that ministers proclaim is their watchword".

Amendment's chances?

PoliticsHome Editor tweets

MPs should 'consider the cost' of the amendment

Immigration Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

The Conservative MP for Rochester and Strood Kelly Tolhurst argues that her county of Kent is already meeting its obligations by taking in over a thousand refugees in the past year. 

"This is not something to be taken lightly" she tells the House referring to the financial pressures faced in her county.

She points out that Kent already suffers a shortage of social workers and foster carers and argues that the UK needs to support the "struggling" children who are already in the country.

She calls on MPs to consider the cost of taking in more children, some of whom, she says "may have significant problems".

Kelly TOlhurst
HOC

Peers return to Housing Bill

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

The statement repeat on the junior doctors' strike has come to an end and peers return to consideration of amendments to the Housing and Planning Bill at report stage.

More information on the junior doctors' contract disagreement can be found here.

'There will be deaths'

Junior doctors' contract statement

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative peer Lord Ribeiro says "as a junior doctor in 1975 I did go on strike" so he says that he understands the doctors' reasons but joins other peers in saying that the withdrawal of emergency care "will lead to deaths".

He says that "when this is all over" there must be an independent inquiry and review into the use of junior doctors in the NHS.

"This is about a sustainability of a workforce that uses junior doctors at the front door to do all the work" he says.

Lord Ribeiro argues there needs to be a new system in place to allow junior doctors more time to be supervised and trained.

Lord Ribeiro
BBC

Amendment will 'simply encourage the people smugglers'

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative Sir Edward Leigh intervenes on Labour's Thangam Debbonaire's speech to defend the government's position.

He says the "fairest and most humanitarian thing to do" is to take children from an unsafe place like Syria rather than a safe place like France. "We will simply encourage the people smugglers."

Ms Debbonaire argues that the UK should be able to do both.

Edward Leigh
HOC

'There has to be a solution'

Junior doctors' contract statement

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher Lord Patel says that he as a doctor he could "never have contemplated" withdrawing emergency cover, but says he understands that junior doctors today feel undervalued by the government.

Speaking about the impasse in the negotiations between the government and the BMA, Lord Patel says "there has to be a solution".

Migrant crisis: What is the UK doing to help?

BBC News

Migrants arriving in Europe
Getty Images

David Cameron has said the UK will accept 20,000 refugees from Syria by 2020. A further commitment to help unaccompanied child refugees may lead that figure to rise, but government sources say it will not change substantially.

Critics have urged the government to do more to help people fleeing conflict in Syria and elsewhere, including those who have made dangerous journeys from the Middle East and north Africa to Europe.

So what exactly is Britain doing to help?

Read more here.

'Junior doctors have got this wrong'

Junior doctors' contract statement

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem peer Baroness Walmsley says that the health secretary should "swallow his pride" and get back to the negotiating table with junior doctors.

Health minister Lord Prior of Brampton says he is "massively sympathetic with the concerns expressed to me by junior doctors not just over the last few months but over the last 12-13 years".

"There is no doubt that the training of junior doctors is wholly inadequate" he says, and outlines many of the issues faced by those in that profession.

"But let's be honest about this, this dispute is about pay on Saturdays" Lord Prior says.

"I do think the junior doctors have got this wrong - to go on strike and withdrawing emergency cover over an issue of premium pay on Saturdays is simply not a big enough issue to cross that threshold."

Lord Prior of Brampton
BBC

'Not an easy decision'

Immigration Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative Stephen Phillips speaks in favour of the Lords amendments and tells the House that he will be walking through the opposition lobby tonight.

It has not been an easy decision or one I have taken lightly. But it is the right decision, made of a conviction which I have reached having searched my conscience as I pray other members will search theirs.

Stephen Philips
HOC