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Summary

  1. This morning, the Public Administration Committee took evidence from the UK Statistics Authority on EU migration figures.
  2. MPs met at 11.30am for Justice questions.
  3. There was an urgent question on the UK's membership of the European Convention on Human Rights.
  4. MPs debated the Policing and Crime Bill.
  5. Peers began their day with questions, and then considered Commons amendments to several bills including the Immigration Bill.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Claire Gould

All times stated are UK

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House adjourns

House of Lords

Parliament

The Northern Ireland (Stormont Agreement and Implementation Plan) Bill passes report stage without debate as no amendments have been tabled.

With that the House of Lords comes to the end of its business and adjourns for the evening.

Peers will return at 3pm tomorrow, but until then - good night.

House of Lords clock
BBC

Commons adjourns

House of Commons

Parliament

Education Minister Nick Gibb notes that All Saints National Academy put in a bid to the Condition Improvement Fund. However the bid was unsuccessful. 

He says a representative can visit the school to provide feedback on the bid. He says the school is welcome to appeal the decision.

He also offers to visit the school himself.

And that concludes the day in the House of Commons. MPs will return tomorrow at 11:30am for Cabinet Office questions followed by Prime Minister's Questions.

Nick Gibb
HOC

BreakingPeers approve child refugees amendment

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have voted to accept amendment E1 on child refugees by 279 to 172, a majority of 107.

The amendment will require the government to relocate and support child refugees from Europe to the UK, but will allow the government to set the number of such refugees that it will take after discussions with local authorities.

An earlier version of this amendment that sought to make the government accept 3,000 unaccompanied child refugees was defeated last night in the Commons by 18 votes.

MPs will have to consider the amendments to the Immigration Bill approved by the House of Lords today before the bill can pass.

'Unsatisfactory toilets and mouldy cloakrooms'

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

David Winnick lists a litany of problems with the state of All Saints National Academy including dampness, unsatisfactory toilets and mouldy cloakrooms. 

He asks the minister to give some optimism to those who want to see essential work take place at the school.

Education Minister Nick Gibb is responding.

Vote on child refugees

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Government minister Earl Howe makes a last attempt to sway peers against supporting Lord Dubs' amendment, saying that UK policy must be about "the children's best interest", and once again outlines the support given by the UK government to reunite refugees directly from the region.

Lord Dubs is unconvinced by these arguments however and says that although he welcomes the work being done by the government in the region of the conflict "when all is said and done the government will leave thousands of children in danger in Europe".

He pushes his amendment E1 to a vote.

Adjournment Debate begins

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs reject the amendment by 305 votes to 182. Debate of the bill will be continued tomorrow.

Labour's David Winnick now rises to introduce his debate on the condition of All Saints National Academy in Walsall. 

'An unacceptable stance'

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Shadow home office spokesperson Lord Rosser speaks briefly in support of Lord Dubs' amendment.

 He says that the government's argument that accepting child refugees in Europe will increase "pull factors" for other refugees has at its heart "a policy stance that we leave all unaccompanied refugee children already in Europe to their fate".

"That is an unacceptable stance", he says.

'Taking our eye off the ball'

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Butler-Sloss
BBC

Former senior judge Baroness Butler-Sloss speaks in support of the amendment, saying "we know there are thousands and thousands of children in Europe who are not being properly cared for".

The crossbench peer says "the longer we wait the more children will be in danger of sexual and labour exploitation".

She says that the UK should be showing the way and agrees that the government is doing "wonderful work elsewhere".

"This doesn't mean we should take our eye off the ball" she warns.

'Astonishing' public support for issue

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Dubs says that although he was "very upset" at the Commons defeat of his amendment last night, he is "astonished" at the popular support there has been for his amendment.

The Labour peer says that the British people are rising to the need for a humanitarian response to this issue.

Lord Dubs tells the chamber about the dangers of exploitation faced by thousands of child refugees in Europe, saying that the fact "almost 10,000 have disappeared" shows the risks they face.

Lord Dubs
BBC

MPs reject CS gas amendment

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Division result announcment
HOC

MPs vote 306 votes to 182 against Labour's amendment.

The next amendment to be voted on is Labour's amendment 10. This requires a guarantee that police funding would be protected before proposals to grant additional police powers to volunteers can be brought forward.

Unaccompanied child refugees

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Home office minister Earl Howe begins his remarks on this group of amendments by saying "this is a highly emotive issue and we have a moral duty to help those in need".

The minister says that the government is "already fulfilling that duty" and explains that its opposition to Lord Dubs' amendment is that "physically transporting unaccompanied children from one part of the EU to another is not the best or most effective way to fulfill our duty".

Earl Howe reiterates the government's commitment to helping refugees in countries in the region rather than those in Europe already, as it fears that such aid could attract other people to make the dangerous sea journey to Europe.

He says that while he sympathises with the amendment "the focus is wrong".

MPs vote on the use of CS spray

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs now vote on Labour's amendment 13 to the bill.

This amendment would stop PCSOs (police community support officers) from being issued with CS spray and PAVA spray. 

Policing and Crime Bill debate comes to an end

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Home Office Minister Karen Bradley now sums up the debate.

On David Burrowes' knife amendment she says the law is clear about due diligence expected of retailers.

She seeks to assure Geoffrey Clifton Brown that relevant stakeholders will be consulted when the Home Office produces statutory guidance but says this is not a matter for legislation.

Karen Bradley
HOC

Government defeat on detention of pregnant women

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have voted to accept amendment D1 by 259 votes to 203, a majority of 56.

Debate now moves on to the issue of relocating and supporting unaccompanied child refugees in Europe. An amendment has been tabled by Labour peer Lord Dubs after an earlier version was defeated by 18 votes in the House of Commons last night.

The previous amendment called on the government to resettle 3,000 such unaccompanied child refugees in the UK.

Lord Dubs' revised version being put forward this evening will instead let the government determine the number of child refugees accepted after consultation with local authorities.

Division result
BBC

Government defeat on 28 day detention

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have voted to accept amendment C1 by 271 votes to 206, a majority of 65.

This means that peers have voted to insist upon their initial amendment to the Commons which was rejected by MPs last night.

The chamber divides again, this time on amendment D1 which seeks to limit the amount of time that a pregnant woman can be detained by immigration officials as being no longer than 72 hours, or up to seven days if a decision has been made by a minister on a specific case.

The result of this division is expected at 6.55pm.

'This would be monstrously wrong'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative Geoffrey Clifton-Brown notes that the bill gives the Home Office the right to produce statutory guidance which the police have to abide by.

He is worried that shooting organisations will not be consulted when such guidance is produced - "This would be monstrously wrong."

His amendment states that relevant stakeholders should be consulted when the guidance is drawn up.

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown
HOC

Peers vote on 28 day detention limit

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Rambotham rises to respond to the minister and to peers who have raised concerns about his amendment C1.

He says he believes a limit of 28 days detention is "entirely reasonable" to place on administrative detention - that is detention imposed by civil servants rather than by courts - and presses his amendment to a vote.

Lord Ramsbotham
BBC

Government response to concerns is 'proportionate'

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Immigration Minister Lord Keen rises to answer the debate on this group of amendments relating to periods of detention and detention of pregnant women.

Lord Keen says a detained person can apply for bail at any point, without having to wait for six months to elapse.  

The home secretary must justify continued detention if a bail application is made.

He goes on to state that detainees have access to interpreters and legal advice to assist in bail applications.

Moving on to answer Baroness Lister's points, he says there is just one pregnant woman currently in immigration detention today, proving that such detention "is exceptional".

Lord Keen says he "cannot accept" that pregnant women are detained without notice, as Baroness Lister had alleged, as the procedure is to notify pregnant women on two occasions prior to detention.

Lord Keen says the government amendments are a "proportionate response" to the concerns of peers, he asks the Lords to withdraw their amendments.

Lord Keen
BBC

Analysis: What's happening with knife crime?

Dominic Casciani

Home Affairs Correspondent

What's going on with knife crime? Wasn't this an offence of the past - one that haunted a succession of home secretaries and chief constables but was now contained and controlled?

Knife crime never went away - it just fell quite a lot and, correspondingly, out of the headlines.

Now figures from the Office for National Statistics have shown that knife offences in England and Wales rose by 2% in the year to March 2015. While that sounds small, it masks a really complex and concerning picture that raises important questions about why it's going up again and whether the police tactics are right.

Read more here.

Crime Chart
Office of National Statistics

Peers urged to support government amendments

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher Lord Pannick says he cannot support the proposal to limit immigration detention to 28 days saying it is too short to consider complex immigration cases.  

He says advice is available to detainees on applying for bail at any point in their detention.

Lord Pannick goes on to say he cannot support the amendments on the detention of pregnant women.  

He says women who arrive in the UK "with no purpose" should be quickly deported. He says the government amendments limiting detention of pregnant women to 72 hours, or up to seven days in exceptional cases, should be supported.

Lord Pannick
BBC

Age checks for knife purchases

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative David Burrowes speaks to his own amendment which introduces age verification checks for those buying knives online.

He says his amendment will enable sellers to prove that they took all reasonable precautions and exercised due diligence before selling a knife.

David Burrowes
HOC

Different views

Parliamentary reporters tweet

Amendments to limit time in detention

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem peer Baroness Hamwee rises to speak in support of Lord Ramsbotham's amendment C1. The amendment would 'insist' on the earlier Lords amendment 84 being sent back to the Commons.

Amendment 84 sets out a 28 day limit on immigration detention, with extensions to that time being decided by a tribunal hearing.

The Commons rejected amendment 84 and offered an amendment-in-lieu setting the detention period at six months before a tribunal hearing to consider bail would be required.

Gwynne: Government using volunteers to 'fill the gap'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Andrew Gwynne worries that the government is "trying to fill the gap" with volunteers and urges ministers to think carefully before proceeding.

He argues that volunteers who will be trained to become special constables are very different from members of the public, trained to a certain level, but not actually being police officers.

"That is where most people would be concerned," he says. 

Set aside 'principles' to ensure protection for pregnant women in detention

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour peer Baroness Lister rises to speak on her amendment D1, which she says seeks to "clarify" the length of time a pregnant woman may be detained, and when that detention period is deemed to have begun.

Baroness Lister says she is prepared to put aside the "principle" that pregnant women should never be detained, and is attempting to help the government "achieve what it says it intends" by the legislation.

She goes on to explain that her amendment also seeks to limit transfer journey times of pregnant women.

Baroness Lister
BBC

Government position on detention

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Speaking about amendments that relate to time limits on immigration detentions, Home Office Minister Lord Keen says that general time limits on immigration detention are opposed by the government because they are arbitrary and do not take account of individual circumstances and "could encourage individuals to frustrate the removal process".

He says that the government feels introducing a time limit would have a negative impact on its ability to enforce immigration controls and "therefore to ensure public safety".

Lord Keen is also outlining the reasons why the government is rejecting amendments concerning the detention of pregnant women, arguing in one instance that the government could be held liable for wrongful detention if a women is not obviously pregnant or has not made her condition known to immigration officers.

He argues that for this, and for a number of other reasons, such a ban in detaining pregnant women in all circumstances would make it difficult to detain any woman of child bearing age.

Minister watching

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

James Brokenshire
BBC
Home Office Minister James Brokenshire watches peers consider Commons reasons for rejecting House of Lords amendments

Knife amendment 'not a silver bullet'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative Kit Malthouse is next and says he will speak in support of new clause 1.

This clause, proposed by a number of Conservative backbenchers, provides a "triple lock" to ensure that knives are not illegally sold over the internet to under-18s.

The triple lock involves age verification on delivery, online age verification and offline follow up checks.

Kit Malthouse tells MPs that the triple lock is not a silver bullet but is a "valuable addition" to tackling knife crime. 

Kit Malthouse
HOC

Immigration detention amendments debated

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

The motions relating to overseas domestic workers are passed without division, and debate now moves on to Commons reasons for rejecting Lords amendments on time limits and judicial oversight for immigration detention.

This group of amendments promises to be contentious as it includes provisions on judicial oversight of immigration detention for any detentions after 28 days, and on the detention of pregnant women.

Lord Keen of Elie
BBC

Ewis Report

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

James Ewis produced a report on the issues faced by overseas domestic workers in December 2015.

The full report can be read here.

Issues raised in the debate

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher Lord Hylton asks if the new proposals would come into effect if an overseas domestic worker only became involved in an abusive employer relationship after they had arrived in the UK.

Lib Dem Baroness Hamwee says she feels the proposals do not go far enough and warns that abused workers will be deterred from escaping by the "complex and conditional" nature of the new rights.

Lord Green of Deddington on the crossbench argues that the proposals will encourage the abuse of the system by opportunistic economic migrants who wish to find a "soft way" into UK employment.

Overseas domestic workers

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Minister Earl Howe says that the government is proposing a "considerable change" to regulations on this matter, that indicate "a common purpose" between government and peers to prevent the abuse of "this group of vulnerable workers".

The minister says that new proposals will allow an overseas domestic worker who finds themselves in an abusive employer relationship to find other employment without having to apply to the Home Office.

Graphene 'tremendously important' to UK

Science and Technology Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Committee Chair Nicola Blackwood closes the session by thanking Dr Geim and Professor Georghiou for answering their questions in this "complex technical area".

She says it is clear graphene is of "tremendous importance" to the UK.

Geim and Georghiou
BBC

The John McEnroe proposal

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour has tabled its own amendments to the bill which prevents volunteers from being given the powers of a Police Constable or Police and Community Support Officer (PCSO).

Another amendment prevents volunteers from being placed in roles where the use of force is required.

Labour also wants to stop volunteers from being able to use CS and PAVA spray - a proposal which Jack Dromey labels the John McEnroe amendment - "the-you-cannot-be-serious proposal".

"What fool came up with that?" he asks.

Volunteer army may swell police service ranks

Danny Shaw

BBC Home Affairs Correspondent

Most people don't choose to spend their weekends at a police station.

But Alan Hunt does.

Every Friday and Saturday night, between 19:30 and 04:00, you will find the cheerful pensioner in a back office at Blandford Forum police station in north Dorset.

His "job" is to monitor footage from four CCTV cameras covering the centre of Blandford, a bustling market town notable for its distinctive Georgian buildings.

At closing time, with people making their way to and from Tiffany's, the town's only nightclub, Alan comes into his own, scrutinising a bank of TV screens for signs of trouble on the streets.

Read more here.

A police volunteer
BBC
A police volunteer monitoring CCTV

Amendment defeated

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have voted to reject Motion A1 by 217 votes to 157, a majority of 60.

The debate now moves on to Motion B which relates to overseas domestic workers.

Dromey: Government is trying to provide police on the cheap

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow home affairs minister Jack Dromey is ambivalent about the changes.

He celebrates the "proud history of volunteering" in the police. 

"But," he says, "it is essential that police functions are discharged by police officers."

He worries that the proposals constitute an attempt to "provide police on the cheap".

Jack Dromey
HOC

'Investigate patenting' says graphene discoverer

Science and Technology Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Patricia Borwick moves on to ask about the Manchester's approach to intellectual property and patents.

Professor Georghiou says the NGI has two dedicated patent specialists handling licensing.

He says academic collaborators would own their own intellectual property (IP), but most partnerships with companies would involve a share of IP with the university.

Conservative Chris Green asks if graphene could have been patented much earlier in its discovery.

Dr Geim says he has about 10 patents, but did not apply for a patent earlier due to the threat of being sued by large companies in the future, who could dispute early patents once the technology was proved.

He says the committee should investigate the system of patenting; he says they are a "defensive mechanism" for commercial products and that this contradicts the purpose of universities, who are not primarily involved in developing commercial products.

Motion A1

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Motion A1 seeks to amend the bill to allow asylum seekers who are having their asylum application processed for over nine months to be able to work in the UK.

Lord Alton's previous amendment sought to allow asylum seekers the ability to work in the UK after six months of an unresolved asylum application, but that amendment was defeated by MPs last night.

The result of the division is expected at 5pm.

Vote on asylum seeker working rights

Immigration Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Alton of Liverpool responds to the bill saying he is not convinced by the government's arguments against his amendment, arguing that 24 other countries have similar arrangements and we have not seen "rampaging gangs of war criminals" on their streets.

"This isn't about free passes, this is about human dignity," he says.

He pushes his Motion A1 to a vote.

The crossbencher indicates disappointment that Labour shadow minister Lord Rosser is not supporting his amendment - which could well be bad news for the amendment's chances if it means Labour peers are not being whipped to vote on this division.