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Summary

  1. MPs on the Defence Committee took evidence on UK military operations in Syria and Iraq.
  2. MPs started their day with questions to the International Development ministerial team.
  3. The prime minister took questions from MPs at midday.
  4. There was an urgent question on the Dublin asylum system afterwards, from Conservative MP Anne Main.
  5. MPs then debated NHS bursaries and education in London.
  6. Peers met at 3pm for oral questions.
  7. They then debate disability benefits.
  8. MPs on the Liaison Committee will be questioning the prime minister from 4.30pm.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Claire Gould

All times stated are UK

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Lords adjourn

House of Lords

Parliament

And that concludes the day in the House of Lords.

Peers will return tomorrow at 11am for oral questions which will cover topics including telephone scams and the national living wage. 

House of Lords clock
HOL

Altmann: Discretion is allowed

Disability rights debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Government Minister Baroness Altmann tells peers that there is no strict 20 metre rule and that discretion is allowed in the decision making process.

She points out that if a claimant can’t walk up to 20 metres “safely, reliably and repeatedly” then they will be guaranteed to receive the enhanced rate of support.

Concerning PIP in general, she says the scheme is performing well having cleared over 1 million claims and that many claimants appear to be happy with their decision.

Baroness Altmann
HOL

'No case made' for 20 metres

Disability rights debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Sherlock
HOL

Labour spokeswoman Baroness Sherlock says the criteria shift from 50 to 20 metres has been very controversial from the outset.

She says the 50 metre level was an established benchmark used by many other governments, whereas “no case was made” for 20 metres.

She suggests the decision to set the criteria at 20 metres was motivated by a desire to save the government money.

Brinton: 'People will end up out of work and isolated'

Disability rights debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem Baroness Brinton also attacks the 20 metres criteria. She argues that some people may be able to walk 20 metres but that they will be left in a lot of pain. 

She also notes that for some walking can cause more damage to joints.

She concludes that the criteria changes will have unintended consequences: "far too many people will end up out of work and isolated".

Baroness Brinton
HOL

20 metres 'gets you nowhere'

Disability rights debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbench peer Baroness Grey-Thompson attacks the 20 metre assessment distance as "completely arbitrary".

20 metres, she argues, "gets you nowhere". She points out that 20 metres could "barely" allow someone to walk from one side of the chamber to the other.

Baroness GRey-Thompson
HOL

'A desperate situation'

Disability rights debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher Baroness Masham of Ilton says that the new criteria has created "a desperate situation" for some disabled people, particularly those living in rural areas.

She says there is "great concern" that society is "going backwards" by taking independence away from the disabled.

Baroness Marsham of Ilton
HOL

House adjourns

House of Commons

Parliament

The adjournment debate has come to a close with the minister saying taxi regulations need to ensure that drivers can ply their trade "profitably but securely".

With the end of the debate comes the end of the day in the House of Commons.

MPs will return tomorrow at 9.30am.

Romance not dead in Tameside

Press Association reporter tweets

Issues raised 'incredibly important'

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Andrew Jones
BBC

Andrew Gwynne finishes his remarks by saying the taxi licencing regime is "drastically outdated" - and asks the minister to "get his skates on" to address the issue.

Transport Minister Andrew Jones says the UK's taxi industry is "one of the best in the world", but on the specifics raised by Mr Gwynne about the licensing issues in Denton and Reddish, the minister says that the issue is one for his local authority.

Mr Jones says that issues raised about protecting vulnerable users are "incredibly important" and that the government encourages local authorities to undertake enhanced criminal record checks on drivers.

Disability rights debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers now turn their attention to a debate on disabilities rights.

Lib Dem Baroness Thomas of Winchester's motion calls on the government to produce a mobility criterion in the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) "moving around" assessment which is fairer than the 20 metre distance.

Under PIP a disabled person is entitled to the higher allowance if they cannot walk more than 20 metres.

The motion notes that there have been a number of reassessments following successful appeals.

Baroness Thomas argues that the government should not be relying in appeals "to create fairness".

a Mobility scooter
Yevgeny Kanevsky/BBC

Fifth government defeat of the evening

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers approve the amendment on sustainable drainage 223 votes to 199.

The last two motions are dealt with quickly and that concludes the debate on the Housing Bill.

The Lords amendments will now be pinged back to the Commons for their consideration. 

A brief history of taxis

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's Andrew Gwynne is leading the day's adjournment debate on taxi licensing regulations.

The MP for Denton and Reddish is giving a detailed history of public hire taxis and the legislation governing them from the days of horse drawn carriages to the current day.

Andrew Gwynne
BBC

Lords vote on sustainable drainage

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Government spokesperson Viscount Younger of Leckie says that the government supports sustainable drainage, but doesn't believe the amendment as presented is workable. He says that developers are already expected to agree "sustainable" drainage plans.

Baroness Parminter says she's disappointed, that the Lib Dems have "moved a long way" on the amendment as a "gesture of goodwill". "We all want more homes, but we want them to be flood resilient" and so she pushes the amendment to a vote.

Lords debate sustainable drainage

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

The Lords is now debating another Lib Dem amendment, this time on national standards for sustainable drainage.

Crossbencher Lord Krebs says that the amendment is about "looking to the future", and seeks to deal with flash flooding. He asks why we would want to build housing that was vulnerable to flash flooding when it is easy to avoid. He adds that the sustainable standards for drainage have the support of the water industry.

Lord Krebs
BBC

Presentation of Petitions

House of Commons

Parliament

The debate on educational funding for London comes to an end, with the minister promising to meet with members of the all party parliamentary group on London when further details of the policy will be available.

With that we move on to the presentation of two public petitions - Conservative Tom Pursglove is presenting a petition on children's centre services in Corby, and the Conservative MP for Eastbourne Caroline Ansell is presenting a petition on bowel cancer screening.

'Wide support' for the policy

Education funding in London

House of Commons

Parliament

Education Minister Sam Gyimah says the government is "committed to delivering educational excellence everywhere in the country" and argues that the changes to the national funding formula are not about "London against the rest of the country".

The minister argues that there needs to be a fairer funding system and says there is "wide support" for the policy "across the country, throughout the sector, and between political parties".

Sam Gyimah
BBC

Differences in perception

Education funding in London

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow Education Minister Nic Dakin says Labour agree with the "principle of fair funding", but argues that the problem is "one person's fair funding can end up as another person's unfair funding".

He says the government has done the right thing by "taking careful steps along this road" but says the debate has shown "there is more to be done" on this issue.

Mr Dakin joins his backbench colleagues in criticising the government's plans to academise all schools in England.

Peers vote for CO2 housing standards

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

And that's two government defeats in the past half an hour or so. This time Peers vote 237 to 203 in favour of the Lib Dems' CO2 standards amendment.

London competing globally

Education funding in London

House of Commons

Parliament

Tottenham's Labour MP David Lammy says the real challenge in our education system is "not between state schools - it's the gap between state schools and private schools".

He also says that despite the progress made in London schools - "there is still a lot of work to do".

Mr Lammy argues that London is competing with capital cities across the world who are investing in education and fears London will fall behind if the changes to the national funding formula go through.

David Lammy
BBC

Peers vote on housing emission standards

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Parminter says the government's arguments are "not compelling" and that new CO2 standards have support in the industry and will not affect "viability" of house building, and will save homeowners money.

She decides to put the amendment to a vote.

Lords debate housing emission standards

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers are now debating another Lib Dem amendment, this time to make new housing meet standards aimed at reducing the CO2 emissions of residential properties agreed under the coalition government.

The government argues carbon emission standards would be a "burden" on the housing industry, particularly smaller builders, and government spokesperson Viscount Younger of Leckie tells the House that "potentially we bring new development to a stop".

Lord Kennedy of Southwark tells the house that Labour members will support the amendment, if it is pushed to a vote.

Government defeated in Lords...again

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have voted for the Lib Dem amendment on neighbourhood plans by 248 to 214, meaning another defeat in the House of Lords for the government.

'Level up' rather than 'level down'

Education funding in London

House of Commons

Parliament

London Labour MPs Andy Slaughter, Ruth Cadbury and Rupa Huq all rise to make arguments against the proposed changes to the national funding formula and the cuts to education funding in London.

Issues raised include problems with retaining teachers in London due to the cost of living, the arguments against the forced acadamisation of schools, and that the government should be "leveling up" other schools rather than "leveling down" London schools.

Peers vote on neighbourhood plans

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Parminter is not persuaded by a government concession and pushes the amendment to a vote. 

The amendment allows for a right of appeal against developments which run contrary to neighbourhood development plans.

EU referendum 'big argument about Britain'

Liaison Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Andrew Tyrie says the prime minister has made a "good fist at answering questions" on the renegotiation, and as a final question asks him to explain why, "in a nutshell", the UK should stay in the EU.

David Cameron says he's not going to sit there and say that the EU is perfect, but the reforms in the renegotiation are a starting point. 

He says the argument about the EU is a "big argument about Britain, if we want a Britain out there tackling Ebola or standing up to Russia or negotiating with Iran", the EU increases our ability to do that. He says there's a strong, positive case to be made for it.

He says that "just because an institution isn't perfect, that doesn't mean you walk away from it".

And with that the committee session ends.

Views explained

Labour MP tweets

'An extremely limited appeal'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Government spokeswoman Baroness Evans of Bowes Park tells peers that the government cannot support an amendment which adds complexity and bureaucracy to the planning process.

Lib Dem Baroness Parminter describes the amendment as having an "extremely limited appeal" and reminds peers that a considerable numbers of Conservative MPs spoke in favour of their proposal.

Baroness Parminter
HOL

Neighbourhood development plans

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Both the Lib Dem and Labour spokespersons welcome the concession and Lord Best's amendment is withdrawn.

The next set of amendments addresses the influence neighbourhood development plans should have on planning decisions.

The Lords had agreed an amendment giving right of appeal to parish councils and neighbourhood forums against those developments, which do not accord with policies in an emerging or made neigbourhood development plan. 

The Commons rejected the amendment and so the Lib Dems have proposed an alternative amendment which removes "emerging" from the wording. 

Dictatorship?

Huffington Post's political reporter tweets

London Labour MPs out in force

Education funding in London

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's Helen Hayes and Catherine West join the ranks of London Labour MPs speaking about the need to preserve the funding for London schools that, in the words of Ms Hayes, have taken them "on a 20 year journey from the worst in the country in the dark days of the 1980s to the best now".

She says "long term sustained investment and leadership" was required to achieve this and asks the government not to "turn the clock back".

Ms Hayes also argues that cutting funding in London schools "risks the potential of our children, the talent of the next generation, and the economy of our capital city".

Ms West joins Ms Hayes in addressing this issue, praising the progress made in educational attainment in her constituency, and arguing that "we don't want this story of continuous improvement to stop".

Helen Hayes and Catherine West
BBC

'A helpful intervention'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher Lord Best has done some calculations and tells peers that it would take over 100 years for the receipts from increased rents to reduce the nation's deficit by 0.01%.

He suggests that it does not seem worth "upsetting" 350,000 council tenants to make such an "infinitesimal reduction" in the deficit. 

However he describes the government's concessions as "a helpful intervention".

He tells peers that he is realistic enough to know that if a government (which has a majority in the House of Commons) offers any concessions on a bill they should be accepted. 

Lord Best
HOL

PM's future on the line?

Liaison Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Labour Brexiteer Frank Field asks if the prime minister would remain in office after a "leave" vote. He says he will stay.

Mr Cameron says "it's quite important this is about Britain's future in Europe" and that he doesn't want anyone to "cloud their decision making" by making it about "one team of politicians or another". 

He adds that he will "accept the verdict" and "do everything he can to put it in place".

Proposals 'very unbalanced'

Education funding in London

House of Commons

Parliament

Stephen Timms
BBC

Former shadow education secretary, Labour's Stephen Timms, says he is "very worried" about the process being followed by the government on the new funding formula proposals -calling them "very unbalanced".

He says he fears "a very unbalanced process will create a very unbalanced proposal".

Mr Timms says that schools funding for pupils in disadvantaged areas "should not be cut" as a result of the new formula.

EU referendum: find out more

BBC Politics

You can find out more about the issues, the campaigns and the EU referendum itself here.

What are both sides saying? Explore the arguments here.

Still celebrating

Huffington Post's political reporter tweets

Project Fear II?

Liaison Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

The SNP's Pete Wishart is asking about what may happen if there is a UK-wide leave vote, but Scotland votes to stay and is taken out of the European Union "against its national will".

The prime minister says it's a "United Kingdom decision" and refuses to be drawn on the rights or wrongs of a second Scottish independence referendum should the UK leave the EU.

Pete Wishart then asks if the PM has learned anything from what he terms "project fear" from the Scottish independence referendum, which he says "squandered" a 20 point lead for "no" in the 2014 vote. He suggests claims made by the remain camp are "exaggerated".

Mr Cameron says he doesn't accept "that there are exaggerated claims" made by the remain side of the argument.

Government makes concessions on 'pay to stay'

Housing and Planning Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

The next set of amendments deal with the issue of higher income earners in social rented housing.

The bill allows for higher income earners living in social rented housing to pay market rents.

The Lords supported amendments to make increasing rents voluntary for local authorities. They also called for a taper to the increased rents and a rise in the threshold at which market rents could be charged (£40,000 outside London and £50,000 in London).

Crossbencher Lord Best has tabled an amendment that would introduce a taper of 10% for the first £10,000 above the income threshold.

Baroness Williams announces two concessions. Firstly that although the income thresholds will remain, the government will introduce a taper of 15%. The government will also review the income threshold each year in line with the consumer price index (CPI) will be applied at 15%. 

Homes
BBC

PM probed on Trade Union Bill concessions

Liaison Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Bernard Jenkin
BBC

Bernard Jenkin asks about concessions made by the government on the Trade Union Bill and quotes Len McCluskey saying the EU referendum "came into play" and that the support of the broad left for a remain vote had been used in negotiations by the unions.

Mr Cameron says "the two issues are separate" and that the Trade Union Bill had been changed because the government lost by a large majority to a crossbench amendment on party funding.

He admits that there had been discussions between the "Better Off In" campaign (presumably, the PM means the Stronger In campaign) and the trade unions, but purely because the unions support a remain vote.

'Punishing' London children

Education funding in London

House of Commons

Parliament

Steve Reed joins other Labour MPs in saying "there is no need to penalise children in London in order to increase funding elsewhere".

He also criticises the government's proposals to turn all schools into academies, calling them "deranged" because it will "distract many of the best schools from providing excellent education and force them to focus quite unnecessarily on governance".

He says he urges the minister to "turn back and think again".

Quick exit?

The Sun's political editor tweets