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Summary

  1. The day began with the Business Statement from the Leader of the House.
  2. There was an urgent question on the recent decision by the High Court to establish the right of parents to take their children on holiday during term-time.
  3. Then there was a statement from Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt on the agreement with junior doctors.
  4. MPs and peers debated the proposals in the Queen's Speech and the proposed legislation.
  5. The debate continues over several days, looking at different subject areas. The Queen's Speech is voted on by the Commons, but no vote is taken in the Lords.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel and Patrick Cowling

All times stated are UK

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Peers adjourn

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Neville-Rolfe concludes telling peers that the government has produced "a one nation agenda that puts the vulnerable first".

She thanks lords for their contribution to the debate and says their expertise will be valuable when it comes to scrutinising the bills.

And with that the day in the House of Lords comes to an end.

Join us on Monday for continued debate, in both chambers, on the Queen's Speech.

Peers adjourn
HOL

Baroness Neville-Rolfe sums up

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Government spokeswoman Baroness Neville-Rolfe covers a range of points in her summing up speech.

She tells peers that government proposals will give the BBC "enhanced editorial and financial independence".

She says the Higher Education and Research Bill will make it "quicker and easier" for high quality education providers to enter the market and award their own degrees.

She defends the government's aim of seeing all schools become academies arguing that "excellence comes with more teacher freedom". 

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
HOL

Government's 'z-turn' on academies

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's education spokesman Lord Watson of Invergowrie worries that the government's U-turn on academies is not what it seems - "it's more of a z-turn".

He expresses concern that although schools will no longer be officially required to become academies they could be coerced through "underhand tactics".

Lord Watson of Invergowrie
HOL

King warns of child benefits 'contradiction'

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Baroness King says that, as a mother of three adopted children, she "warmly welcomes" government efforts to increase adoption where it is in the best interests of the child. 

However she asks the government to fix what she believes to be a contradiction in its welfare policy.

She notes that child benefit under universal credit will be limited to two children with some exemptions, including adopted children.

The baroness worries that this exemption only applies to adopted children that are genetically related.

This, she tells peers, makes no sense. 

Baroness King
HOL

Commons business comes to an end

House of Commons

Parliament

Minister Tobias Ellwood concludes by saying that the reopening of the British embassy in Iran last year and the nuclear deal are "positive steps" with our relationship with Iran, and says the government will do whatever it can do to help in the case of Mr Foroughi.

With that the House of Commons adjourns for the day, and indeed the week.

MPs will return at 2.30pm on Monday. 

Conservative peer welcomes business rate plans

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative Baroness Wheatcroft welcomes plans to give local authorities the power to set business rates.

She argues that this will encourage "creative thinking" about how to attract businesses.

She hopes that differential rates will "generate new life" on the high street which have been "blighted by shop closures". 

Baroness Wheatcroft
HOL

Minister: Government has been lobbying Iran over Foroughi case

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Tobias Ellwood
BBC

Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood sets out the government's position on dual nationality citizens, saying that "ownership of a second passport obligates the owner to that second state".

He says that from a Foreign and Commonwealth Office consular policy basis "we do not normally provide the same level of assistance to dual nationals in the country of their other nationality".

Minister Ellwood says on this specific case, the government has been involved in a huge amount of effort in lobbying the Iranian government directly and indirectly over the release of Mr Foroughi.

He also says that consular staff have been working to support the family.

Family fear continued imprisonment

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Mr Dowden tells MPs that the family of Kamal Foroughi did not go public about his situation initially as they did not want to make his situation worse, but have decided to raise the issue now because of his deteriorating health.

The MP for Hertsmere says that it is compliant with Iranian law to release Mr Foroughi, but says the family fears that the Iranian government will try to bring other criminal charges against him upon the completion of his sentence.

He says that it would be an "indication of the seriousness of the commitment of the Iranian government in improving Anglo-Iranian relations" if they secured the release of Mr Foroughi and other people in this situation. 

Oliver Dowden
BBC

Social care system 'at breaking point'

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem Baroness Brinton accuses the government's approach to social care as being not only invisible but "an invisible elephant".

She says the system is at "breaking point" due to a "perfect storm" of the increasing pressures of an ageing population and cuts to local government. 

Baroness Brinton
HOL

Background on Kamal Foroughi case

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Mr Foroughi has been imprisoned in Iran on a conviction for spying for the last four years, having been arrested in May 2011 and sentenced in 2013 to eight years' imprisonment at Evin Prison.

Mr Foroughi received seven years for spying and one year for possessing alcohol at home.

The Foreign Office has been aware of the case since 2013, but is unable to provide consular support, as Iran does not recognise Mr Foroughi's dual nationality. 

Modern-day palliative care 'a disgrace'

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative Lord Naseby sticks to the subject of health provision, choosing to make three points.

He urges the government to drop changes to the Cancer Drug Fund - arguing that "it is working well as it is". 

He calls palliative care "a disgrace today" and tells peers that trainee GPs are not taught any element of providing such care.

Finally, he says he is concerned that 70% of female GPs want to work part-time and calls for "an urgent review" to rebalance the GP intake to a 50:50 gender balance from the present 60:40 split between female and male trainees. 

Lord Naseby
HOL

MPs begin debate on Kamal Foroughi case

House of Commons

Parliament

The debate comes to an end, and after some housekeeping and the presentation of a petition on the closure of Lloyds Bank in Bredbury, we move on to the adjournment debate - which is being led today by Conservaitve MP Oliver Dowden.

The debate is on the detention of dual Iran and UK citizen Kamal Foroughi in Iran. 

Local government to 'design own destiny'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Minister Lewis outlines several of the legislative proposals on local infrastructure within the speech, saying the plans "take place in the broader context of localism" with the devolution of "billions of pounds of infrastructure funds".

The government, he says, is allowing local government to "design their own destiny" 

Mr Lewis says it is for these reasons that this is "such an important gracious speech that delivers for the country". 

Brandon Lewis
BBC

Minister says Labour 'doing down our country'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Housing Minister Brandon Lewis rises to respond to the debate for the government and responds to John Healey's attacks on the government's record, telling him:"he can keep his record of boom and bust and we'll keep ours of rescue and reform".

He tells the Labour frontbench to "stop doing down our country". 

Frontbench filled

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Frontbench
BBC
The Conservative backbenches may be relatively empty, but ministers are out in force for the end of this debate.

NHS 'heading for a crash'

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham
Getty Images

Lib Dem Lord Taverne begins on a pessimistic note, telling peers that the national health service is heading for a crash sooner than anyone fears.

He accuses the government of being intent on reducing the NHS's income at a time when pressures on the service are rising.

He proposes a new reformed national insurance system whereby contributions are earmarked for health and social care. 

Healey attacks government record on infrastructure

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

John Healey attacks the record of the government since 2010 in response to Patrick McLoughlin's earlier remarks about the Labour government's legacy.

The shadow minister says that in the last year of the Labour government spending on infrastructure was 3.4% of GDP, whilst it has fallen to 1.9% this year.

"That is the reality of the difference between the great rhetoric and the actions we see from this government", he adds. 

Changes to prisons 'long overdue'

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Suri
HOL

Conservative Lord Suri welcomes the government's measures on prisons.

He argues that the "reform is long overdue", in part because governments want to be seen as tough on crime.

He tells peers that he eagerly anticipates the results from of giving six prisons more autonomy. 

Shadow minister criticises 'managerial' Queen's Speech

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

John Healey
BBC

Shadow Communities and Local Government Minister John Healey begins his response to the day's debate by remarking: "what an extraordinary waste of time".

He says that he counted 42 announcements in the speech, of which only four "had not been announced already".

"This is the so-what Queen's Speech" he tells MPs, calling it "minimal, managerial and marking time". 

Broadband speed pledge 'a huge disappointment'

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem Lord Clement Jones is not convinced by the government's pledge to introduce a universal service obligation (USO) guaranteeing a minimum broadband speed of 10 megabits per second.

He argues that this level is far too low, pointing out that the average speed in the UK is 39 megabits.

The USO, he says, will be a "huge disappointment" for those in rural areas. 

Broadband box
PA

SNP MP: 'Long-term economic misery' awaits many

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

SNP MP Roger Mullin says that he thought the Queen's Speech was "a stalled government awaiting the result of the European referendum", but then heard from the Leader of the House this morning that the "completion of these 21 bills would complete the full accomplishment of the Tory manifesto".

"A threadbare Queen's Speech with no future plans, and a period of long term economic misery awaits many people", he says. 

Roger Mullin
BBC

Another election on its way

BBC Parliament reporter tweets

A bouquet of 'few flowers'

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem peer Lord Foster notes that the Queen's Speech has been referred to as a bouquet.

He suggests that if it is a bouquet it is one of "quite few flowers and many of them are quite old".

He tells peers that "the biggest threat" to our nation will not come from measures in the Queen's Speech but from a leave vote in the referendum.

That, he says, is "our biggest challenge".

Lord Foster
HOL

Funding London schools

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Griffiths of Burry
HOL

Labour Lord Griffiths of Burry Port raises concern about the funding of London schools

He worries that a change to school funding will result in top-slicing the money given to London schools.

He tells peers that these schools are currently "riding high" thanks to increased investment.

However, he worries that reducing budgets in the capital will undermine these successes.

What's in the Queen's Speech?

Queen's Speech debate

For a breakdown of the bills outlined in the Queen's Speech that will be coming up in this parliament, the BBC has produced an at-a-glance summary of the legislation set out yesterday.

Read more here.

Queen's Speech
Getty Images

Government should 'keep its feet on the ground'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Jim Shannon
BBC

The DUP's Jim Shannon says that the government should "keep its feet on the ground" and "postpone take-off" on the futuristic transport plans while there are still existing transport issues that need to be dealt with.

He makes the point that plans for a space-port have been unveiled but the decision on airport expansion in the south-east of England has not been made.

Fast train to Doncaster?

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Adding to the Labour-heavy contributions to the debate in the last half hour, Melanie Onn now speaks about transport links in her constituency of Great Grimsby, saying that the government have "a blind spot" in this area.

Ms Onn says that with Hull being named the City of Culture for 2017, cross-Humber transport links should be improved as they currently stop very early. This, she says, will limit the potential of people in Grimsby to benefit from the City of Culture events in Hull next year.

The MP says that the speech contained reference to "space travel and trips to the moon", remarking "to be honest, my constituents would just be happy to get to Doncaster in under an hour".

Melanie Onn
BBC

Call for better regulation for dentisits

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Colwyn
BBC

Conservative Lord Colwyn says regulation for dentists needs to be "modernised", and calls on the government to "set out a clear timetable for action in this area".

He argues that getting accepted at an NHS dentist is a "challenge" in some places, and argues for a shift in focus from treatment to prevention in oral health.

Government will be judged on actions not intentions

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Andrew Gwynne
BBC

Labour MP Andrew Gwynne says "yesterday we had a day of ceremony and pomp - behind all of it we have the reality of another year of Tory government".

The MP for Denton and Reddish lambasts the government for its record on inequality.

He says that the government's record in the last six years is one of "reliance on food banks, increase in tuition fees, abolition of the EMA, the pernicious and evil bedroom tax, reduction in social security support - including for the disabled and those in work".

"Intentions are all fine and well but it is your actions that you will be judged on," Mr Gwynne warns ministers.

Future of children's TV

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Benjamin
BBC

Liberal Democrat Baroness Benjamin tells peers that all government policy should be assessed at cabinet level for its impact on children.

She says she is concerned that the recent white paper on the BBC is not clear enough about the future of children's content.

She calls on the government to "think very carefully" about the future of children's television.

Peer says university changes 'needlessly drastic'

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Rees
BBC

Crossbench peer Lord Rees says the university sector needs a "more diverse ecology"

He says that the government is proposing "needlessly drastic" changes in the way research is funded.

He argues the changes will make it harder to attract people to become directors of research councils.

MP issues warning on carers

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Barbara Keeley is dedicating the majority of her speech to carers and how, in her view, the Queen's Speech "fell short" on this issue.

"There is nothing in the gracious speech to improve support for carers or to ensure that local authorities have the resources necessary to implement the duties the government placed on them in the Care Act 2014", she says.

Ms Keeley also says that there has been a rise in carers in recent years and warns that "failure to address these needs" will effect both carers, especially elderly carers - and those being cared for.

The MP for Worsley and Eccles South warns that unless the government takes action "we will continue to see higher costs and lower levels of support" for carers. 

Barbara Keeley
bbc

Peer calls for music therapy for young people

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne
BBC

Liberal Democrat Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne says she is "alarmed" by mental health problems among school children, and argues that music therapy could help young people suffering depression.

She tells the House that music is "enormously effective at developing emotional IQ". 

The Baroness goes on to add that the government has "washed its hands" of the responsibility to promote music in schools. 

The EU and Sedgefield

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Phil Wilson
BBC

Phil Wilson, the Labour MP for Sedgefield, says that the Hitachi factory in his constituency would be under threat if the UK voted to leave the European Union in the upcoming referendum.

He says that 95% of the workforce at the factory are from the north east of England, and that they are "skilled and well payed".

Mr Wilson says that for these reasons he will be voting to remain in the EU. 

Road death targets 'demonstrate ambition' - Labour MP

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Jim Fitzpatrick speaks against the removal of targets for reducing road deaths and injuries, saying that there has been consensus across the House for the last 30 years "on the ambition to reduce deaths and serious injuries on our roads".

Transport Minister Clare Perry intervenes to say that "targets are not the same as outcomes", adding that British roads are "safer than they have ever been".

Mr Fitzpatrick replies: "I do not for a second underestimate the ambition of the frontbench opposite to reduce deaths and serious injuries".

"My point is that we need to demonstrate that ambition", he adds. 

Jim Fitzpatrick
BBC

Peer says abortion law discriminates against the disabled

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Shinkwin
BBC

Conservative Lord Shinkwin tells peers that "a one-nation society is one that doesn't discriminate on the grounds of disability".

He argues that having a higher abortion limit for disabled foetuses, compared with non-disabled foetuses, is a form of discrimination.

He says that a similar law would not be put in place on the basis of skin colour or gender. 

University for older people

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Sharp of Guildford
BBC

Liberal Democrat Baroness Sharp of Guildford says in the future the economy will be more dependent on older workers, and this means that part-time degree courses will become more important in order to keep the skills of the workforce up to date.

She observes that older people may be put off if they have to incur more debt, but that the government has offered no other solution. 

SNP MP calls for more transport spending

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Alan Brown
BBC

The SNP's Alan Brown tells MPs that "any sensible investment in infrastructure is to be welcomed", and calls for the government to spend more.

He adds that the SNP's policy of scrapping the Trident nuclear submarine system would free up more money to be spent on infrastructure.

He goes on to argue that the government should cover the costs of HGV training, which he thinks is an opportunity to increase employment levels. 

He calls it a "spend to save move", as it would decrease the amount of money spent on welfare for the unemployed. 

A 'sturdy table' stunt

Humble Address

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem Lord Addington addresses the issue of special education needs (SEN).

He tells peers that he assigned a researcher to dig out the number of times the government had responded to questions on SEN with the answer "yes, we need people better trained to deal with it".

"At 39, I told him to stop", he adds. 

He says he has considered a publicity stunt whereby he places all the documents on a sturdy table, and calls on the government to ensure teachers are taught how to deal with children with SEN. 

Lord Addington
HOL

Traffic problems in Bath

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Ben Howlett
BBC

Conservative Ben Howlett says his Bath constituency is "blighted by traffic problems and air pollution". 

He says that it will "come as no surprise to the minister that I want to raise this issue", because it is the "only thing I ever talk about".

He adds that driverless cars could cut congestion and reduce emissions, and calls for more to be done to help to introduce them.