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Summary

  1. From 9am the BIS and Work and Pensions Committees heard more evidence on BHS.
  2. The day in the House of Commons started at 11:30am with Wales questions, followed by PMQs.
  3. MPs and peers debated the proposals in the Queen's Speech. The day's subject in the Commons was education.
  4. The debate continues over several days, looking at different subject areas. The Queen's Speech is voted on by the Commons, but no vote is taken in the Lords.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

Get involved

House adjourns

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon brings his remarks to a close and the debate on the Queen's Speech comes to an end in the House of Lords.

Peers will return tomorrow at 11am for oral questions and a number of short debates on various subjects.

Until then, good night. 

Summing up

Queen's Speech deabte

House of Lords

Parliament

On energy, Lord Ahmad says the government is committed to supporting the UK oil and gas industry and to increase competition and consumer choice in the energy market.

Speaking about transport issues, he says that for decades "we have see Britain fall down the global infrastructure league table" but says that thanks to government action "we are climbing it again" and are ahead of France, Japan, and Germany in producing infrastructure projects.

The minister says the government welcomes the contributions of peers and looks forward to the continuing dialogue with the House in bringing forward this legislative programme.

Lord Ahmad
BBC

Minister: Queen's Speech about a stronger Britain

Queen's Speech deabte

House of Lords

Parliament

Transport Minister Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon has the task of summing up a six-hour debate, covering five different subject areas, and with 52 speakers.

He says the Queen's Speech was about building a "stronger, more resilient, more secure, and more modern Britain" and he says he cannot agree with peers who have asserted that this is not the case.

"If we have learnt anything from the past decade then we have to live more responsibly in the times of plenty", he says.

Government 'speaks ambitiously and acts meanly' on devolution

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Davies of Oldham
BBC

Labour frontbench spokesman Lord Davies of Oldham is summing up the debate for the opposition.

He joins other peers in saying a few words of praise for the new Bishop of Newcastle for her maiden speech earlier in the debate.

Regarding regional devolution, Lord Davies says the government "talks rather ambitiously and then acts more than a little meanly", telling peers that the "northern powerhouse" policy cannot be realised without effective resources allocated to it - "otherwise it is just an expression".

Other subjects that he touches on in his response are criticisms on the lack of a skilled workforce, safeguarding key industries, and the effect of austerity on low earners.

Problems with modern capitalism

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Liberal Democrat peers Lord Oates and Lord Smith of Clifton embrace the rather vague topic of "economic affairs" by using their remarks to address the issues they have with the modern capitalist system.

Lord Oates says that real wages fell in the UK between 2009-2015 by more than 10% - "the longest decline since the middle of the nineteenth century".

"Wages for the majority have barely risen since" he says, and argues that "an Uber economy" is increasingly developing "where workers are expected to employ themselves while corporates enrich themselves at the expense of a workforce for which they refuse to accept any responsibility".

Lord Smith says modern capitalism exists "on the myth of shareholder control" and asks the minister for an analysis of the "shady world" of modern capitalism to encourage effective corporate government. 

Lord Oates
BBC

Recycling, Management training, and future transport

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Morris
BBC

Labour peer Lord Morris of Handsworth says that for the sake of the next generation "we have a responsibility to step back from our excesses" and stop endangering the environment.

He argues that recycling is a lifestyle change that can benefit the environment and the country, and calls on the government to challenge the "great deal of cynicism" in the country towards the issue of recycling.

Liberal Democrat peer Lord Cotter says that it is vital for the development of the UK economy for the government to train company managers better, as "too many people are paid fantastic amounts of money and are just incompetent".

Conservative Lord Patten speaks about the proposed Modern Transport Bill and wishes the department for transport good luck in the "legal minefield they are clearly about to enter" with the advent of driverless cars. 

Lord Patten
BBC

Housing, farming and energy

Queen's Speech

House of Lords

Parliament

The broad scope of the topics up for discussion today prompts a broad spread of subjects being spoken about by peers across the chamber.

Lib Dem peer Baroness Thornhill speaks about homelessness in her area of Watford and says that the government should focus on "prevention rather than cure".

But, she warns that "admirable rhetoric without a full working knowledge of what the reality means and in practice will actually cost, will turn good intentions into empty gestures".

Conservative Lord Inglewood says the environment "needs investment and creates wealth" and argues that the rest of the country has been "freeloading off the back" of rural England.

Independent Labour peer Lord Truscott spends his remarks talking about energy, and says that the government's "silver bullet" of shale gas is not as full-proof as ministers think.

He says that in ensuring the UK's energy security, "we should take care not to unquestioningly embrace sources of energy that will do more harm than good". 

Commons adjourns

House of Commons

Parliament

The Day's business in the House of Commons has come to an end and the chamber has adjourned for the evening.

MPs will return tomorrow morning at 9.30am.

Remembrance, youth and education

Battle of Jutland debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Minister for the First World War Centenary David Evennett says it is important to commemorate those involved in the Battle of Jutland but also to recollect the "reconciliation with Germany".

He tells MPs that the key themes of the centenary events are remembrance, youth and education.

He concludes by paying tribute to the soldiers who die on both sides - "we must ensure they are never forgotten". 

David Evennett
HOC

Lessons learnt

Battle of Jutland debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Flick Drummond tells MPs that lessons can always be learnt from triumph or failure.

She says Jutland wants a triumph "although it did not resemble a second Trafalgar".

As a result of the battle, she argues procedures were improved and the navy entered World War II better led.

Flick Drummond
HOC

What does the Queen's Speech say about transport?

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Driverless car
PA

Another of the big topics covered by today's debate is the issue of transport.

The big headline of the Queen's Speech was the line that spoke of the government ensuring the United Kingdom is at the forefront of technology for new forms of transport, "including autonomous and electric vehicles".  

This relates to the proposed Modern Transport Bill which seeks to introduce measures to encourage investment in driverless cars, electric cars, commercial space planes and drones, as well as ensuring insurance is available to users of driverless cars.

The BBC's Transport correspondent Richard Westcott's report on the future of travel in the UK can be found here.

Other transport measures include the previously mentioned Bus Services Bill which seeks to require operators to share route, fare and schedule data with app developers, and introduce measures for clearer and simpler franchising arrangements.

A number of peers are also using today's debate to register their support or opposition to the High Speed Rail Bill - which gives the legislative framework for the HS2 rail development.

Battle of Jutland

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

The debate concludes and MPs move on to an adjournment debate on the Battle of Jutland opened by Conservative MP Flick Drummond.

The Battle of Jutland was the only major naval battle of World War I – it was also the largest sea battle in naval warfare history.

The battle took place in the North Sea near Denmark between the English, who lost 14 ships and the Germans who lost 11.

Both sides claimed victory.

Soldiers mark the 90th anniversary of the Battle of Jutland
MOD
Soldiers mark the 90th anniversary of the Battle of Jutland

Labour amendment rejected

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

The Labour amendment has been rejected 300 votes to 263.

That's a government majority of 37.

The debate on the Queen's Speech will resume tomorrow.

Division!

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

The debate concludes and Labour's amendment is put to a vote.

The text of the amendment reads:  "At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech contained proposals to enable further increases in tuition fees; believe that there should be no further increases in tuition fees; and further believe that no good or outstanding school should be forced to become an academy."  

Division
HOC

'Stark differences' between Labour and the Conservatives

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Education Secretary Nicky Morgan says it is clear that, on education, there are "stark differences" between Labour and the Conservatives.

"We take the side of parents, they support stagnation and decline."

Nicky Morgan
HOC

Powell: Government using pupils 'as guinea pigs'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow education secretary Lucy Powell sums up for the opposition.

Concerning the government's plans to convert schools to academies, she argues that there is "no evidence" that academisation itself leads to improvement.

She urges the government to get independent analysis rather than "using today's kids as the guinea pigs of their experiments". 

Lucy Powell
HOC

SNP MP: 'Unequal Britain will be embedded'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Carol Monaghan
HOC

The SNP's Carol Monaghan tells MPs that in Scotland the SNP will "protect pay scales, terms and conditions, standards and qualifications".

She compares this to the situation in England, where she believes education is "being flushed down the toilet of deregulation".

"Those who can afford to will go private and unequal Britain will be embedded".

'Ambition' of Queen's Speech defended

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem Lord Shipley says that some have criticised the Queen's Speech for "lacking ambition". He thinks that a few things within it do show ambition, including the proposed Bus Services Bill and the Local Growth and Jobs Bill. They "could make a huge impact", but says there wasn't enough to tackle inequality. 

Another thing that shows ambition, he argues, are the government's plans for a space port in Cornwall, but Lord Shipley suggests that "before the government propels tourists into space, it really should complete the dualling of the A1 between Newcastle and Edinburgh."

Lord Shipley
BBC

Further education 'a crucial bridging gap'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Angela Rayner
HOC

Labour's Angela Rayner tells MPs that for her school wasn't a place to learn "it was a way of getting away from your parents and a place to hang out with your mates."

She didn't finish her GCSEs but was able to returned to further education when she was a care worker - "it was tremendously important to me...a crucial bridging gap".

She therefore expresses disappointment that the further education sector was "barely mentioned" in the Queen's Speech and worries that FE providers in her constituency are facing 40% cuts. 

Spaceports, farming and beaches

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

The Bishop of Portsmouth says that measures about spaceports "catch the headlines" but can seem "fanciful distractions" to people who have not seen the benefit of the economic recovery.

"They do not offer hope to our fellow citizens who look for hope and bold policies to secure their economic future," he says.

Earl of Caithness
BBC

Conservative peer the Earl of Caithness speaks about the issues faced by farmers of livestock and crops that should be addressed by a Wildlife Bill. He says that politicians "must let farmers do their job properly".

Lib Dem Baroness Parminter says it is with "sincere regret" that she's notices the word environment does not appear in the speech at all. She also praises the European Union for addressing environmental issues such as cleaning up British beaches.

Baroness Parminter
BBC

Servicemen should not be 'hounded'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

UUP's Danny Kinahan talks about Stormont House Agreement and the agreement reached on dealing with the legacy of the Troubles.

Under the agreement the Historical Investigations Unit was established to examine unsolved murders carried out in the past.

The Independent Commission on Information Retrieval was also set up to allow perpetrators of murders limited immunity from prosecution in exchange for information - provided the family of the victims involved agree. 

Danny Kinahan wants assurances from the government that servicemen will be fairly treated and not "hounded".

Stormont
PA

Local government measures in the Queen's Speech

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers are debating a fairly wide-ranging scope of topics this afternoon - one of which is local government.

The Queen's Speech promises the devolution of further powers to directly elected mayors, "including powers governing local bus services", which will be covered by the proposed Bus Services Bill.

Legislation was also promised to allow local authorities to retain business rates, "giving them more freedom to invest in local communities" - covered by the Local Growth and Jobs Bill. 

The Neighbourhood Planning and Infrastructure Bill will seek to make several changes to planning processes and introduce a new statutory framework for paying compensation. There are also plans to give local communities more say over neighbourhood planning, and to privatise the Land Registry.

From sewage to pensions

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Seema Kennedy
HOC

Conservative Seema Kennedy admits she will be dealing with a number of unsexy subjects from water and sewage to pensions. 

Her constituency was hit by contamination in the water supply and she raises concern about the "highly monopolistic nature" of the water market.

She therefore welcomes the Better Markets Bill which aims at speeding up competition investigations and giving regulators more money. 

"We are dealing with adept businesses and people who are highly-lawyered - we need strong measures in place." 

The Better Markets Bill would implement a number of the Competition and Markets Authority's (CMA) recommendations including strengthening the ability of price comparison services to help consumers find the best deal.

Debate covers environment and care leavers

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Featherstone
BBC

Former coalition government minister, the Lib Dem peer Baroness Featherstone, says the government has "been found wanting" on tackling climate change, and says there is not "a single reference" to the issue in the Queen's Speech.

Baroness Young of Hornsey speaks about the measures in the Speech relating to children and young people in and leaving care. She talks about the problems faced by care leavers of all ages in accessing their care records from local authorities.

Baroness Young of Hornsey
bbc

Hustings in the Lords

Parliamentary reporters tweet

Prevent strategy 'traumatises' children

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Yasmin Qureshi
HOC

Labour's Yasmin Qureshi uses her speech to raise concerns about Prevent  - a part of the government's counter terrorism strategy.

She criticises Prevent for being "ineffective, counter-productive" and responsible for traumatising children as young as six.

Prevent has an annual budget of £40m and is aimed at stopping young people becoming involved in violent extremism. 

As part of the "Prevent Duty" schools, prisons, NHS and local authorities have a legal obligation to identify individuals who might be vulnerable to extremism. 

Earlier this year the National Union of Teachers called for the Prevent strategy to be withdrawn from schools and colleges on the grounds that it created "suspicion and confusion".

For example a child was said to have been identified for writing about living in a "terrace house" which was misinterpreted as a "terrorist" house.

The Department for Education said it "makes no apology" for protecting young people from extremism. 

What's in the Queen's Speech?

Queen's Speech debate

From spaceports to prison reform - the Queen's Speech contained a number of new legislative proposals for the coming parliamentary year.

The BBC has produced a bill-by-bill summary of the speech with a breakdown of what proposals can be expected in each planned piece of legislation.

Read more here.

The Queen
PA

Homelessness and steel mentioned

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Former Conservative chief whip Lord Young of Cookham welcomes the "broad thrust" of the Queen's Speech and says that the government is earning a reputation for social reform.

He says this reputation would be "further enhanced" by legislation on homelessness.

Former Welsh secretary, Labour peer Lord Morris of Aberavon says he spoke in his first Queen's Speech in 1959 and asked for a bypass in south Wales to serve the Port Talbot steelworks. He says he now speaks about the future of the industry itself and calls for the steel industry to be nationalised.

This would protect the steel industry from the cycle of "years of plenty followed by years of famine".

MP calls for a Somerset university

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Rebecca Pow
HOC

Conservative Rebecca Pow praises the government for transforming education by extending the principles of freedom and accountability.

She particularly welcomes the provisions in the Higher Education and Research Bill which would aid the establishment of new universities.

She hopes that a university can be set up in her Somerset constituency where she says the best and brightest students are lost to other areas - "and this is reflected in the productivity of the area".

Maiden speech of a new bishop

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Christine Hardman, the new Bishop of Newcastle, is making her maiden speech in the House of Lords.

She says that she has received a "heartwarming welcome" from members and staff in the House of Lords, and tells peers about a school visit to the chamber when she was 16 to watch the debates.

The Bishop speaks warmly about how "the beauty of my diocese takes my breath away" and speaks of places of pilgrimage such as "Holy Island and St James' Park" - which prompts a peal of laughter in the chamber.

She says that the government's plans for economic recovery, creating jobs, and creating infrastructure for business are key to the "economic and human flourishing" of the north east of England.

The north east, she says, is not "a problem to be solved by the rest of the country - it is an asset to be valued".

A sea of bishops
BBC

Extreme punishments in the Commons?

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative Bob Stewart intervenes on a speech by Labour's Jenny Chapman to agree with a point she makes about the importance of decisions made by young people at the age of 16.

But he forgets a crucial piece of parliamentary procedure and refers to Mrs Chapman as "you" throughout his point. In the Commons, members are supposed to speak to each other via the chair, and refer to each other as "the honourable member" or "my honourable friend".

Remembering an earlier dressing down handed out to another member by the deputy speaker Eleanor Laing, Bob Stewart apologises. "I'm sorry madam deputy speaker, I deserve to be hanged," he says. 

EU debate should not 'freeze us in immobility'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Bakewell of Hardington Mandeville
BBC

Lib Dem spokesperson Baroness Bakewell of Hardington Mandeville says that she found the Queen's Speech to be "sadly lacking" in highlighting the government's aspirations for the country in the coming 12 months.

She says it is a shame that the EU referendum seems to have taken most of the government's attention, saying that those on both sides of the debate should not be "frozen into immobility".

Baroness Bakewell spends much of the rest of her speech covering the issues in the speech that relate to community planning arguing that there is a "balance to be struck" between the needs of communities and developers.

'The best spin on thin pickings'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord O'Neill finishes his speech which has covered regional devolution, transport, and housing, and Labour frontbencher Baroness Jones of Whitchurch rises to congratulate him for putting "the best spin on thin pickings".

She says the country faces "huge challenges" and tells peers the Queen's Speech represents a missed opportunity to tackle the "underlying causes of our economic woes".

Bareonss Jones says the UK is not immune to global market turbulence but argues "we can take steps to mitigate the impact". 

"Sadly the chancellor seems incapable of the strategic interventions necessary to do this."

Baroness Jones of Whitchurch
BBC

Minister: Economic surplus 'most sensible policy'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord O'Neill of Gatley
BBC

Lord O'Neill says there has been "clear progress to date" in fixing the public finances, and says the government's aim towards an economic surplus remains "the most sensible fiscal policy" to prepare for the "inevitable future economic shocks that may come our way".

Queen's Speech debate continues

House of Lords

Parliament

Treasury Minister Lord O’Neill of Gatley is now leading the final day's debate on the Queen's Speech in the House of Lords.

Today's debate is centred on the issues of economic affairs, energy, environment, local government and transport.

Lord O'Neill says the speech "lays the groundwork for the long-term good of our country".

Housekeeping

House of Lords

Parliament

A modest 25 proposals relating to House of Lords Committee membership have been moved by the Chairman of Committees Lord Laming, but are not allowed through on the nod as UKIP peer Lord Pearson of Rannoch rises (to audible groans) to question why there need to be six EU subcommittees.

The chair of the overall EU select committee Lord Boswell of Aynho rises to respond to Lord Pearson, saying he had assumed he would raise an objection - calling it a "seasonal necessity".

He says that the committee is minded to use the EU referendum as an opportunity to "launch a thorough review of our scrutiny model", and also criticises Lord Pearson for not taking part in debates on the committee's reports.

Lord Pearson responds: "I do not participate because they have so little influence in Brussels."

The motions are accepted without division.

Lord Boswell of Aynho
BBC

Northern schools 'losing' funds to south

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's Catherine McKinnell is speaking about the proposed "Education for All Bill", promised in the Queen's Speech.

One of the proposals is a national funding formula for schools, which the government says will "ensure that schools with the same kinds of pupils get the same funding".

Catherine McKinnell represents Newcastle Upon Tyne North and says that the new funding formula will result in the north "losing funds to the south" says that schools in the north are already under-funded in comparison with London.

Turkey and the EU: what is the government policy?

Oral questions

House of Lords

Parliament

Turkey and the EU
Getty Images

Conservative Lord Green of Deddington is asking the government what its current policy is regarding Turkey joining the European Union.

Baroness Anelay of St Johns responds that the government sees the EU accession process as the most effective means of encouraging reform, stability, and democracy in Turkey.

She repeats the statement of the prime minister that Turkish membership of the EU is "not remotely on the cards" and that every member state has a veto to new members joining.

Lord Green asks if the government is aware of the similarities between the economic situation in Turkey today and eastern Europe in 2004 from which, he says, the UK has seen "over one million migrants".

Baroness Anelay says that the UK has new transitional controls on free movement that did not exist in 2004.

Detention of pregnant women

Oral questions

House of Lords

Parliament

Green Party peer Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb is asking the government whether it will change its policy to routinely publish statistical information on the detention of pregnant women under the Immigration Act 2014.

Home Office Minister Lord Keen of Elie says the detention of pregnant women occurs only in "very limited circumstances" - only when there is a "clear prospect of early removal or in "very exceptional circumstances".

He says that in the new immigration act the government is considering collecting data on detained women who have disclosed their pregnancy.

Baroness Jones says this is "very welcome news" and says its seems "incredible that it is beyond the wit of the Home Office" to count the number of pregnant women in detention.

Pregnant woman
PA

New funding formula

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Chloe Smith
HOC

Conservative Chloe Smith welcomes a new funding formula for schools - "pupils should get the same kind of funding".

In its manifesto the government pledged to introduce a new funding formula and is currently consulting on proposals.

Former Education Committee chairman Graham Stuart argued that the best-funded areas received up to £6,300 per pupil compared to £4,200 in the worst-funded areas.

Labour's shadow education secretary Lucy Powell warned that "the devil will be in the detail" and accused the government of stalling on revealing where funding would be cut.

The government is also proposing giving money directly to schools by-passing local authorities.