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Summary

  1. At 9:30am MPs asked questions to the Attorney General.
  2. The SNP's Ian Blackford asked an urgent question about the deportation of the Brain family
  3. The deputy leader of the House outlined future business in the Commons.
  4. Business Secretary Sajid Javid made a statement on the steel industry
  5. MPs spent a final day debating the proposals in the Queen's Speech. The day's subject is the economy and work.
  6. The Defence Select Committee heard evidence on the UK's operations in Syria and Iraq.
  7. The House of Lords debated voter registration and mental health.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

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Commons adjourns

House of Commons

Parliament

House of Commons clock
HOC

The debate concludes - as does the day - and the week in the House of Commons.

MPs will break next week for the Whitsun holiday but return a week on Monday to debate the Investigatory Powers Bill.

Join us then.

No statutory basis for compensation

Adjuornment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Energy Minister Andrea Leadsom replies for the government and notes that there is no statutory basis for compensation for a perceived reduction in market value caused by proximity to a mineshaft.

She explains that legislation only covers subsistence damage and that the presence of a mineshaft within 20 meters of a property is not a barrier to obtaining a mortgage.

Andrea Leadsom
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Constituents 'unable to enjoy the fruits of their labour'

Adjournment debate

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Adrian Bailey tells the chamber that his constituents have "done everything right" from paying their taxes to working hard to buying a home.

Now, he says, they are "unable to enjoy the fruits of their labour".

"They are trapped in a property that they cannot sell for a reasonable price."

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

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MPs now move to the adjournment debate on the coal authority and compensation procedures which is opened by Labour’s Adrian Bailey. 

Compensation can be claimed if coal mining has caused subsistence damage to a property for example cracked plaster, sticking doors and ground collapse.

Adrian Bailey raises the case of his constituents who recently discovered that their property was above a coal mineshaft but have had difficulty claiming compensation. 

Adrian Bailey
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Large majority

MailOnline's deputy political editor tweets

Motion passed

Queen's Speech debate

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MPs have voted in favour of the motion 297 votes to 237. Essentially that means the Queen's Speech has passed the Commons - by a majority of 60.

Final vote

Queen's Speech debate

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The amendment is rejected 303 votes to 52.

That's a majority of 251.

MPs now vote on the motion to offer "humble thanks" to HMQ for the "Gracious speech" with the added amendment concerning the NHS and TTIP.

House of Commons
House of COmmons

NHS and TTIP amendment accepted

House of Commons

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Labour's amendment is rejected 300 votes to 189.

The next amendment is amendment C which regrets that "a bill to protect the NHS from the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) was not introduced in the speech".

This is a crossbench amendment which the government was forced to accept in order to head off a backbench rebellion. 

It is passed without a vote. 

MPs are now voting on the SNP's amendment D which calls on the government to abolish the House of Lords and withdraw plans to renew Trident. 

Division

Queen's Speech debate

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The debate concludes and MPs now vote on Labour's amendment to the Queen's Speech.

The amendment calls on the government to abandon plans to repeal the Human Rights Act.

It also urges the government to adopt Labour proposals on fiscal credibility and tax transparency. 

'We're not going to write people off'

Queen's Speech debate

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Work and Pensions Secretary Stephen Crabb accuses the opposition of being "far too relaxed" about "parking people for a whole lifetime" in the welfare system. 

That's why, he argues, it takes Conservatives to transform lives - "We're not going to write people off," he says.

Stephen Crabb
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Chancellor is 'fit as a butcher's dog'

Queen's Speech debate

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The shadow work and pensions secretary Owen Smith notes suggestions that the Queen's Speech was thin because the government has "run out of steam".

He is unconvinced, arguing that the Chancellor, who sits opposite, is "fit as a butcher's dog".

The reason, Owen Smith suggests, for a thin Queen's Speech is that it fits with the "nothing to see here, everything's fine" narrative.

The shadow secretary naturally disagrees with that narrative, calling George Osborne the "third worst Conservative chancellor" in terms of growth.

Owen Smith
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Breaking up the banks

Queen's Speech debate

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The SNP's George Kerevan considers the Better Markets Bill.

He tells MPs that for genuine competition, the UK's "monopolised banking system" needs to be split into six or seven similarly sized banks.

He accuses the government's two new regulatory bodies (The Competition and Market Authority and the Financial Conduct Authority) of having failed to deliver.

He suggests this is because they know the Chancellor isn't serious in wanting more competition.

George Kerevan
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Tackling money laundering

Queen's Speech debate

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Tom Elliott
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The UUP's Tom Elliott welcomes legislation introduced to tackle corruption and draws attention to money laundering taking place in Northern Ireland - "a huge economy on its own".

He suggests the National Crime Agency should be the lead partner in tackling the problem, rather than HMRC. 

The Criminal Finances Bill will "refocus" the activities of the Suspicious Activity Reports regime to tackling systemic money laundering.

'A strong family is at the core of a successful economy'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

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The Conservative's Lucy Allen welcomes the government's commitment to strong families - "a strong family is at the core of a successful economy".

She argues that children in care or in the youth justice system are denied the possibility of achieving their ambitions.

Future hearing

Commons committee tweets

What's being debated

Labour party tweets

Queen's Speech additions

Queen's Speech debate

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Roger Mullin
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The SNP's Roger Mullin also provides a few proposals he would have added to the Queen's Speech.

Firstly he calls for "vastly strengthened" support for whistle-blowers particularly when it comes to issues such as money laundering.

He also urges the government to simplify the tax code. He argues that the more complex the code, the easier it is for people to cheat it.

Sceptical but hopeful

Queen's Speech debate

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Margaret Ritchie
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SDLP MP Margaret Ritchie welcomes the government's commitment to establishing a legal right to fast broadband. However she expresses concern about "what this really means".

She ask a number of questions including who will be responsible for delivering the right and who can rural communities turn to "when they have been let down".

She hopes the government is sincere but says she remains sceptical.

A 'fairly awful' Queen's Speech

Queen's Speech debate

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Labour's Jonathan Reynolds describes the Queen Speech as "fairly awful" not HM's delivery but the proposals themselves.

The MP laments the lack of big thinking and suggests three things he would have included if he had been writing the speech:

  • The creation of an industrial strategy
  • The establishment of a Royal Commission to look at the future of welfare
  • Proposals for serious democratic reform.
Jonathan Reynolds
HOC

End of the day in the House of Lords

Mental health debate

House of Lords

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Baroness Brinton replies to her debate and thanks everyone who has spoken in the debate. She says she hopes the minister will be able to go to the Treasury and use arguments heard in the House this afternoon to argue for money mental health funding.

And that's it for the House of Lords today. Both houses are on recess next week, so return on Monday 6 June.

House of Lords clock
BBC
House of Lords clock

Change 'won't happen overnight'

Mental health debate

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Health Minister Lord Prior of Brampton is replying for the government. He emphasises government support for parity of esteem between mental and physical health but says we "have to be realistic" at how long it will take. It is, he says, the work of "more than one Parliament".

He says "we are absolutely committed to delivering better mental health over the next five years, but you'll have to have some patience because it won't happen overnight".

'Comprehensive response' needed to report

Mental health debate

House of Lords

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Lord Tunnicliffe is speaking for Labour. He says it's still difficult for people to talk about mental health, which he calls "the last great taboo", but there have been great improvements. 

He says he hopes for a "comprehensive response" to the report from the minister and guarantees of resources going into mental health to make "parity of esteem a reality". 

Lord Tunnicliffe
BBC

'What else do we share'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

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Birthday Cake
BBC

More birthday wishes for Jeremy Corbyn. This time from Conservative MP Neil Parish who shares a brithday with the opposition leader - "I'm trying to work out what else we share".

Mr Parish, who is also the chair of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee, welcomes the introduction of a legal right to fast broadband; however he says BT currently have too much of a monopoly over delivery.

The Digital Economy Bill gives consumers the right to broadband with a minimum speed of 10Mbps (megabits per second) and the automatic right to compensation when broadband service goes down.

There have been some complaints that the company responsible for the UK's broadband network (BTOpenreach) is part of one of the leading internet service providers.

An Ofcom report earlier this year did not call for the two to split but said Openreach should have more independence from BT. 

Mental health a 'first order' issue

Mental health debate

House of Lords

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Speaking for the Liberal Democrat front bench, Baroness Tyler of Enfield says that the life expectancy people with mental health problems is 10 to 20 years shorter than for those without. Mental health, she says, is a "first order issue".

She welcomes the forward review but says the "task of turning rhetoric into reality is a Herculean one".

She asks the minister to tell the House precisely how much money will be available for mental health, and says she worries that the additional £1bn available will not be enough given "historic under-funding".

'From the cleaner to the chief executive'

Queen's Speech debate

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Caroline FLint
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Labour's Caroline Flint uses her speech to call for tax transparency. She says a strong economy only works "when everyone from the cleaner to the chief executive pay their tax".

The Criminal Finances Bill was announced in the Queen's Speech introduces a criminal offence for corporations who fail to stop their staff facilitating tax evasion.

The government promised this legislation in the wake of the Panama Papers - a number of leaked documents which revealed tax evasion activities. 

Oxfam welcomed the measures but warned that "it is only one small piece of the tax dodging jigsaw. Urgent action is needed to tackle the much larger gaps...Corporate tax dodging robs poor countries of $100bn a year".

The Chartered Institution of Taxation Tax Policy Director John Cullinane expressed concern about the measures: "There is enough law in relation to corporations in this area already...It is very problematic to hold a company responsible for an individual's actions."

Government can have 'profound impact' on people

Mental health debate

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Liberal Democrat peer Lord Oates is making a very personal and passionate speech about his own battle with depression, telling peers that it is "difficult to describe the terror of being caught in a spiral of depression".

He says that "real will" is required to ensure that support and services are available and sufficiently joined up.

The peer also speaks about coming to terms with his sexuality during the time of debate about the Section 28 of the Local Government Act 1988, which forbade the promotion of homosexuality by local authorities.

He contrasts this with the actions of the Coalition government on seeking parity of esteem between mental and physical health, saying that the actions of government and churches and other institutions can have a "profound impact on the sense of self worth an mental health of individuals in the country".

Lord Oates
BBC

What does the Queen's Speech say about the economy?

Queen's Speech debate

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Money
PA

The Queen's Speech included the Local Growth and Jobs Bill which allows local authorities to retain 100% of business rates.

The Better Markets Bill introduces measures to make it easier for customers to switch banks and energy providers. It also seeks to speed up competition investigations and give regulators more powers.

The Life Savings Bill establishes a New Lifetime ISA for under-40s and a Help to Save scheme for those on low incomes. The scheme is open to those who receive working tax credits or universal credit and offers a bonus of up to £600.

Mental health debate begins

Mental health debate

House of Lords

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Baroness Brinton
BBC

Lib Dem peer Baroness Brinton is now moving the third and last debate of the day which asks the House to note of the recommendations of the Five Year Forward Review for Mental Health and the case for ensuring equal access to mental and physical healthcare.

She says that the numbers of mental health sufferers that find themselves in the criminal justice system before they get access to health support and treatment is "shocking and a shameful reflection on our society".

Baroness Brinton says that the government's current policies will not provide parity of esteem of resource between mental and physical health.

Minister: Government 'not complacent'

Young voter registration debate

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Cabinet Office Minister Lord Bridges of Headley says that a vibrant democracy rests on an engaged electorate and the level of engagement is a measure of the trust and faith in the political system.

He says that the introduction of online registration has improved voter registration numbers and outlines plans to allowing local authorities more autonomy on addressing voter registration issues in their areas.

"We are not complacent on this issue," he tells peers

'A rotten, hollowed out government'

Queen's Speech debate

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Stewart Hosie brings his speech to an end with an attack on the Conservatives' record.

"This government is failing on every key economic indicator. They've missed almost every target they set for themselves. Their claim to economic credibility is in tatters." 

He concludes describing the government as "rotten" and "hollowed out".

Tax evasion and HMRC office closures

Queen's Speech debate

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SNP Treasury Spokesman Stewart Hosie welcomes new offences concerning tax evasion but says it will be undermined by "the counter-productive decision" to close HMRC offices.

This, he argues, will strip local business of the support they need

Stewart Hosie
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'Real practical steps' needed from government

Young voter registration debate

House of Lords

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Lord Kennedy of Southwark is responding to the debate from the Labour frontbench and says he hopes the minister will not just give a number of spending figures in response to the debate but rather outline "real practical steps" being taken by government to help people to register to vote.

That millions of our citizens are eligible to vote but not registered to vote is "outrageous" he says.

How do you register to vote?

Young voter registration debate

House of Lords

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The referendum to decide on the UK's membership of the European Union is on Thursday 23 June 2016.

It will put the question "Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?"

Voters will have to mark an X in either the 'Remain a member of the European Union' box or the 'Leave the European Union' box.

Here's how to register to vote.

Voting
PA

UK record on voter registration 'shameful'

Young voter registration debate

House of Lords

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Baroness Ludford responds to the short debate for the Liberal Democrats and says that the UK being ranked 20 out of 20 countries for voter turnout for those aged up to 30 is "absolutely shameful".

She says that votes at 16 would go a long way towards addressing the issue of young voter registration, arguing that getting young people "hooked" while they are still at school is essential.

The peer also outlines the contradictory and confusing information given by various government websites on how to register to vote.

Baroness Ludford
BBC

Conservatives 'up for the fight'

Queen's Speech debate

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The chancellor concludes by telling MPs that with "record employment and the fastest growing economy in the developing world it would be easy to think job done".

However he says that would be "failing the British people - I didn't come into politics to see that happen".

He foresees battles and controversy ahead but insists that the Conservatives are "up for the fight".

'Labour is on life support'

Queen's Speech debate

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George Osborne
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The Chancellor attacks the opposition. "Labour is on life support. The policy of the shadow chancellor is 'do not resuscitate'," he says.

John McDonnell intervenes to point out that the Conservatives lost all the recent mayoral elections.

George Osborne fires back calling Labour's performance in the May elections as "the worst for an opposition party in 30 years".

"If they want to live in a parallel world, they can. We'll get on with governing the country."

Enhancing democracy

Young voter registration debate

House of Lords

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Lib Dem Baroness Smith of Newham says the referendum is a chance to enhance democracy in the country but argues that it is essential there is a high voter registration rates and a high turnout for the decision.

Crossbench peer Lord Kerr of Kinlochard says he believes referenda are "the devices of dictators and demagogues" but admits that now "we are where we are". The self-confessed technophobe says that Facebook should repeat its action during the run up to the general election of reminding people to register to vote.

Loss of voters from register 'is not random selection'

Young voter registration debate

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Lord Lexden
BBC

Conservative Lord Lexden praises Bite the Ballot for providing "simple factual and neutral" information to inform young people who have registered to vote for the EU referendum, which he says is a welcome change from the "exaggerated and tendentious claims" from both sides of the main debate.

He says that serious, well informed and balanced material is wanted by voters and remarks that "amongst the young the appetite for such material is especially strong".

Labour's Baroness McDonagh says "never has so much money been spent on registering so few voters" and claims the loss of voters to the register "is not a random selection".

If you are white, she says, and own your own home then you are 90% likely to be registered to vote. In contrast, she says that if you are young, from an ethnic minority, male and living in an urban area - you are under 10% likely to be registered to vote.

Baroness McDonagh
BBC

Times past

Parliamentary service tweets

'Long term economic plan' hailed

Queen's Speech debate

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The Chancellor George Osborne is now speaking.

He lists a series of promises and reforms on prisons, care, mental health and schooling which he calls "bold" and says that "none of this would be possible without the bedrock of the financial stability and prosperity that our long term economic plan is delivering".

George Osborne
BBC