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Summary

  1. The day in the Commons began with questions to the Scotland ministerial team.
  2. Prime Minister's Questions was at noon and followed by a statement on the Chilcot report into the Iraq war.
  3. There was a statement on the junior doctors' contract.
  4. The remainder of the day was given to Opposition day debates - on EU nationals in the UK, and on NHS spending.
  5. Peers continued their long EU referendum debate today, after oral questions at 3pm.

Live Reporting

By Esther Webber and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

Get involved

End of Lords business

House of Lords

Parliament

The Lords wind up for the day, with Foreign Office Minister Baroness Anelay of St Johns telling peers: "We should all find new ways of living well together," and asking them to reflect on the words of the Archbishop of Canterbury yesterday. 

The Lords will return tomorrow at 11am for questions on: 

  • motoring offences and penalties 
  • television broadcasting of the 2016 Paralympic Games 
  • increasing in the maximum penalty imposed by magistrates 
  • UK universities participating in Horizon 2020 research collaborations and the Erasmus Programme. 

Labour appeals for no return to the 1980s

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Winding up for Labour, Lord Collins of Highbury refers to a speech yesterday by Conservative Lord Lawson of Blaby in which he said the Brexit vote would give the UK a chance to "finish what Margaret Thatcher started". 

Had that message been communicated during the campaign, Lord Collins claims, remain would have won. 

He says he has no desire to see the UK "go back to the 80s - when communities were left devastated".

'Leave side had passion' - Lib Dem peer

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Smith
BBC

Lib Dem Baroness Smith of Newnham criticises the remain campaign, saying it "focused on the narrow economic case" whereas "the leave side had passion". 

She adds she does not believe the UK should pursue a second referendum, and stresses the need to "move on from hyperbole and fear to keep the UK together". 

Former diplomat compares Brexit to a shipwreck

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Hannay
BBC

Former ambassador to the UN and crossbencher Lord Hannay of Chiswick tells peers: "This post-mortem of the overturning of successive governments is about as grim as it gets."

"What can be saved from the shipwreck?", he asks. 

He stresses the need to "work closely" with the EU and "move in lockstep" as far as possible even after the UK leaves the bloc. 

What are the implications of Brexit for Northern Ireland?

Mark Devenport

BBC News NI Political Editor

Flags
Reuters

Our politicians are embroiled in discussions about the implications of Brexit on both sides of the Irish Sea, but so far not a lot of concrete ideas have emerged.

Both the SDLP and Sinn Fein have suggested creating an all Ireland national forum to consider the implications of Brexit.

On Saturday, Sinn Féin deputy leader Mary Lou McDonald said the Irish government had confirmed such a forum would be set up.

Maybe it would lead to something, but unionists would probably shy away and, at first glance, it looks like a talking shop.

Read more.

Peer warns of threat to Northern Ireland peace process

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness O'Loan
BBC

Crossbencher Baroness O'Loan, the first Northern Ireland Police Ombudsman, raises concerns about the peace process, saying it was "built upon the understanding of a shared border within the EU".

"We remember it - we remember the border checks and it can be no coincidence that 56% of people in Northern Ireland voted to remain," she says. 

She goes on to say that Northern Ireland is not asking for special arrangements but "for the protection of the UK", without which "division seems inevitable". 

End of Commons business

House of Commons

Parliament

And with that, business in the House of Commons comes to an end. 

MPs will be back tomorrow at 9.30am for a day of backbench business debates, starting with a statement from the chair of the Defence Committee, Dr Julian Lewis, on their report on Russia: Implications for UK defence and security.

Then MPs move on to debate on a motion on online abuse , led by former Cabinet minister Maria Miller.

She is one of the leading figures in the Reclaim the Internet Campaign, which campaigns against abuse and bullying online. 

Maastricht rebel: A vote to set us free

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Framlingham
BBC

Conservative Lord Framlingham, who was one of the Maastricht rebels, objects to talk of "mendacity" in the campaign. 

He says he's pleased "at long last able to vote to set us free". 

Minister approves vulnerable witnesses roll out

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Victims Minister Mike Penning
BBC

Victims Minister Mike Penning says he "agrees with nearly everything" Ann Coffey says. 

While he is "yet to get full clearance" he announces current pilot schemes will be rolled out by the end of the year.

The roll-out will begin with Crown Court procedure for those under 18, he concludes.

Call for new techniques in cross-examining vulnerable witnesses

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Ann Coffey
BBC

Ann Coffey tells MPs that traditional cross-examination techniques are not appropriate for of vulnerable witnesses.

"Court rooms are not a hospitable environment to anyone but a lawyer", she says.

For most, the surroundings "are intimidating and procedures strange", and this is even harder for children and other vulnerable witness, she adds. 

For sexual offences in particular many victims fail to report or peruse protection "because they fear facing humiliation in court".

She says the government needs to look at all "protective measures for vulnerable witnesses", including extending the practice of pre-recorded evidence to cross examinations.

MPs approve Labour motion

NHS Funding debate

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs approve the Labour motion without the need for a vote.

They now move to the adjournment debate, led by Labour's Ann Coffey, on the cross-examination of vulnerable witnesses.   

Vote Leave 'cannot run away' from NHS funding claim

NHS Funding debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Health Minister Ben Gummer says the claim there would be "£350m a week additional for the NHS" is not one that "any member of Vote Leave can run away from". 

Mr Gummer says he did not make the claim.

"We have a duty on both sides of this house to hold to account the people who made those claims", he adds. 

The EU referendum campaign was won partly on the basis of the £350m claim, and "people will be expecting results, as a result". 

Health Minister Ben Gummer
BBC

Vote Leave 'abrogated responsibility'

NHS Funding debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow health minister Justin Madders
BBC

Shadow health minister Justin Madders notes that no Leave campaigners have spoken in today's debate.

"Who haven't we heard from" he describes them, "those who spearheaded the campaign claiming there was £350m just sitting there waiting to be spent on the NHS".

There has been an "abrogation of responsibility" by Leave campaigners, he argues, whose promise "could never be kept and should never have been made".

Referendum campaign 'failed national interest'

EU referendum campaign

Baroness Andrews
BBC

Labour's Baroness Andrews claims the referendum was a "gamble which was never meant to come off".

She says "we did not show how Europe has helped our country" and "the referendum campaign failed the national interest".

She asks that the UK avoid "rushing" into activating Article 50 and that it should be subject to a parliamentary vote. 

Text of Motion

Debate on EU nationals

House of Commons

Parliament

The opposition day motion being debated right now, and voted on this evening, is not legally binding on the government, but will rather be seen as a signal of intent from MPs.

The text of the motion reads: 

this House notes that the Vote Leave group during the EU referendum campaign claimed that an extra £350 million a week could be spent on the NHS in lieu of the UK's EU membership contribution; further notes that senior figures who campaigned, including the hon. Member for South Northamptonshire, the hon. Member for Uxbridge and South Ruislip and the Rt hon. Member for Surrey Heath have subsequently distanced themselves from that claim; and calls on the Government to set out proposals for additional NHS funding, as suggested by the hon. Member for South Northamptonshire on 4 July 2016.

Are we giving £350m a week to Brussels?

Reality Check

The Vote Leave battle-bus
Getty Images

AS has been mentioned in the debate the Vote Leave campaign claimed the UK gives £350m a week to Brussels - or £50m per day.

In fact they painted it on the side of their bus (see picture).

Read more here.

Vote Leave 'not speaking for the government'

NHS Funding debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt says Vote leave "were not speaking for the government" when they said there was going to be an extra £350m for the NHS.

Vote Leave campaigners did "scale down their claim" when questioned, he says.

But even the "smaller £175m net figure" for money coming back from the EU is "not one you can bank on with any certainty". 

"Even if it did materialise post-exit form the EU, it would be negated by even the smallest contraction in the economy" and could be wiped out by a contraction as little as 0.6%, he says.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt
BBC

'Deceiving the public'

NHS Funding debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Diane Abbott goes on to tell MPs that a survey by the Healthcare Financial Management Association found "one in five finance directors" in the NHS believe the "financial situation will worsen" for the NHS in 2016-17 due to Brexit.

One in three believe care will deteriorate due to the financial losses, she adds.

At a time when "money was never more needed for the NHS, when can we expect to see the £350m more a week?" she asks.

"Or is it the case that they were deceiving the public?"

Vote Leave are reneging on deals

NHS Funding debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Dianne Abbott
BBC

Shadow health secretary Diane Abbott tells MPs that "within hours" of the EU referendum results leave campaigners were reneging on promises made during the campaign

Tory MEP Daniel Hannan said taking back control of immigration did not necessarily mean cutting it.

But the biggest "reversal was Nigel Farage within hours of the vote saying it was a mistake" for the Vote Leave campaign to say leaving the EU would mean £350m a week more for the NHS.

This was "not an ordinary campaign slogan" but was "painted on the side of the Vote Leave battle bus" and "emblazoned on backdrop to speeches", Ms Abbott says.

MPs debate £350m a week for NHS claim

NHS funding debate

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs now move to today's second Labour motion, on NHS funding and Vote Leave’s campaign slogan which called for the £350m to be pumped into the NHS rather than the EU.

The Treasury Select Committee had called Vote Leave's claim that Brexit would save £350m a week "deeply problematic".

UKIP peer says European Commission 'should be left to wither'

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

The only UKIP peer to contribute to the debate so far, gave a speech late last night in the Lords which we thought we should bring you up to speed on. 

Lord Willoughby de Broke first paid tribute to Nigel Farage, saying that without "his brilliant leadership of UKIP, the people of this country would never have had the ​opportunity to have a referendum on whether they wanted to continue to contract the government of their country out to Brussels or wanted to become a self-governing democracy again".

And he expressed the view that the government "should negotiate with the member states directly, leaving the entirely discredited Commission to wither on the vine - nobody pays any attention to what the Commission says any more". 

Watch again: Betty Boothroyd on Parliament post-Brexit

House of Lords

Parliament

Former Speaker Betty Boothroyd says 'Parliament is paralysed'.

MPs vote to maintain EU nationals status in UK

Debate on EU nationals

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted to approve the Labour motion calling for the government to give EU nationals currently living in the UK the right to remain, by 245 votes to 2.

The government has abstained.

It's worth noting that the motion is not legally binding but acts as a signal of MPs' views on the subject.

Tellers deliver the vote to the Speaker
BBC
Tellers deliver the vote to the Speaker

Most PMs 'half-hearted' over Europe

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Rodgers
BBC

Lib Dem Lord Rodgers of Quarry Bank, one of the "Gang of Four" of senior Labour politicians who defected to form the Social Democratic Party (SDP), told the House a little earlier how "dismayed and profoundly shocked" he was at the referendum result. 

He related that he "grew up just after the Second World War - and we dreamed of a better, more prosperous country and no more war".

But, he went on to say, he found all prime ministers apart from Ted Heath "half-hearted"  in their support for Europe and that the UK's problems were often blamed on the EU.

MPs vote on EU nationals status

Debate on EU nationals

House of Commons

Parliament

A vote is called on the motion, but there's no movement from the government benches.

It looks like the government are abstaining but supporters of the motion - mostly Labour - are forcing the vote to have the results officially recorded.

Watch this space, it could be Labour win, due to government abstention.

'More complicated than the right to live here'

Debate on EU nationals

House of Commons

Parliament

Home Office Minister Karen Bradley says the current air of uncertainty is the "consequence of the decision to leave the EU" and the government had warned this may happen.

The issues are more "complicated and wider than just the rights to stay here", she says.

But there is no question of EU status or circumstances changing while the UK remains a part of the EU, she says.

She calls on MPs to not use the circumstances "for party political point scoring" which is leading to "scaring people".

Home Office Minister Karen Bradley
BBC

Thornberry: Government should be ashamed

Debate on EU Nationals

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry says the government "should be ashamed" of its approach to EU citizens.

"We all know there has been a rise in racism and a rise in attacks" and it is in the hands of the minster "to do something about it".

This is "not just a outrage on moral terms" but also a "cack-handed negotiating strategy".   

The debate has shown it is "quite clear" what the opinion of the House is, she argues, and calls on the government to follow suit and say "those who were here before the EU referendum their future is secure, they are welcome and they are able to stay here".

Shadow Foreign Secretary Emily Thornberry
BBC

Where is the Home Secretary?

House of Commons

Parliament

Several MPs have been asking where Home Secretary Theresa May is if she is not responding to the debate.

According to a tweet by one MP she has been visiting a 'taste of Colchester' event in Parliament during the debate.

View more on twitter

Baroness Boothroyd: We are failing on every front

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Boothroyd
BBC

Crossbencher Baroness Boothroyd says in the wake of the referendum "we are failing on every front - we have a lame duck government, and we have a leaderless and divided opposition that is the despair of those who expect better of the Labour Party".

She declares people are "sick to the stomach of the sloganising" and it's Parliament's responsibility to determine where the country goes next. 

She expresses her hope that Parliament's right to vote on Brexit will not need to go to court, demanding to know: "If it [Parliament] is not sovereign, what was the referendum all about?"

From earlier today in PMQs

SNP MP tweets

Johnson support for EU nationals

House of Commons

Parliament

Boris Johnson, who has said he will support the Labour motion, has written an article calling for there to be "no risk whatever to the status of the EU nationals now resident" in the UK.

Writing his weekly column in the Telegraph, the former Mayor of London said "immigration will continue – but in a way that is controlled, thereby neutralising the extremists."

Read Mr Johnson's "five point plan for Brexit" here.

U-turn predicted

Parliamentary reporters tweets

Second referendum on Brexit deal urged by Lord Hain

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Hain
BBC

Labour's Lord Hain argues that while Leave voters knew what they were against, "nobody knew what sort of alternative future they were voting for". 

He advocates a second referendum once a deal has been negotiated on the terms of Brexit. 

He also outlines what he sees as risks to the Northern Ireland peace process, warning he cannot see how it is possible for the "current open crossing to survive".

Support for abstention

Press Association Parliamentary Editor tweets

Send a signal to Europe, says Leave campaigner

Debate on EU nationals

House of Commons

Parliament

Leading Leave campaigner and Labour MP Gisela Stuart
BBC

Leading Leave campaigner and Labour MP Gisela Stuart condemns the 'Breaking point' poster, and points out is was not part of the official Leave campaign.

She argues James Brokenshire "cannot pretend people are not a bargaining chip and then say we have to wait the outcome of negotiations".

This is an issue of British sovereignty and so Mr Brokenshire is "perfectly capable of getting up and saying that anyone here who had rights acquired before the 23 June will continue to enjoy those rights".

This would send a signal out to the rest of Europe, she argues. 

Lord Howard predicts bright future outside EU

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Howard
BBC

Peers now move on to a second day of debate on the EU referendum, starting with a speech from former Conservative leader Lord Howard of Lympne.

He says the main reason he wants the UK to leave the EU is to "restore the supreme authority of the Parliament and court of the UK".

He believes there is a "bright future" outside the EU and negotiating a new relationship with it will not be "as complicated or as long as has been predicted". 

Cooper: Minister defending the indefensible

Debate on EU nationals

House of Commons

Parliament

Former shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper
BBC

Former shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper argues this is abut children being bullied in the playground "being told they have to go home".

To stop the "bullies in the playground or those trying to attack people on the streets" the home secretary and the prime minister have to say "of course we don't expect anyone to be sent back to their home countries on the back of this vote".

Ms Cooper says that James Brokenshire has been "sent to defend the indefensible for the second time this week" and she hopes he has had a "promise of a very good job" by Home Secretary and leading Conservative leadership candidate Theresa May.

Allen: We need to be the adults

Debate on EU nationals

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Heidi Allen
BBC

Conservative MP Heidi Allen compares Brexit to a divorce to make her point.

"If this is a divorce, we in this chamber are the responsible adults and these people are our children" and we "now owe it to them to protect them".

She says that the public opinion of politician is "even lower than when I joined the House of Commons a year ago, and I didn't think that was possible".

The only way to "lead them back to a point of trust" is to improve security for our citizens and their neighbours.

Lord Blunkett accepts responsibility

BBC Today in Parliament reporter tweets

'Blindingly obvious' EU nationals will stay

Debate on EU nationals

House of Commons

Parliament

Stuart C. McDonald
BBC

SNP Immigration spokesman Stuart C. McDonald says his party will be supporting the motion today.

He calls Theresa May's comments at the weekend "gravely misjudged" which "caused apprehension where there does not have to be any". 

It's "blindingly obvious that EU nationals will be able to stay here" but they must "hear that from the Home Secretary" in order to feel safe.