Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. MPs asked the Defra team questions; followed by questions to the Church Commissioners, Public Accounts Commission and Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission.
  2. MPs then debated a report from the Defence Committee, Russia: Implications for UK defence and security.
  3. There were two backbench debates: online abuse and support for the UK's creative industries
  4. Peers began with oral questions and then turned to four short debates.
  5. One of the debate in the Lords was on the case for holding a second referendum on the UK’s membership of the EU.

Live Reporting

By Esther Webber and Georgina Pattinson

All times stated are UK

Get involved

End of business

House of Lords

Parliament

That's it from the Lords today. They're back tomorrow at 10am for the private members' bills: 

  • Modern Slavery (Transparency in Supply Chains) Bill 
  • Armed Forces Deployment (Royal Prerogative) Bill 
  • Bread and Flour Regulations (Folic Acid) Bill

In the meantime, goodbye and thanks for joining us.

UK must be 'responsible' on migration

Refugees and migrants debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers are winding up a debate led by Lib Dem Lord Roberts of Llandudno on plans to work with other nations in addressing large movements of refugees and migrants. 

Government spokesman the Earl of Courtown says there are "clear humanitarian concerns" accompanying mass migration as well as the scope for trafficking and organised crime. 

The UK must act as a "responsible global player", he argues. 

Commons finishes for the week

House of Commons

Parliament

The Commons has risen for the day and will return on Monday. It'll be Work and Pensions questions at 2.30pm, followed by the committee stage of the Wales Bill - and there's likely to be some urgent questions or ministerial statements too.

Examining human rights in Sri Lanka

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Wes Streeting is now leading the adjournment debate on human rights in Sri Lanka. 

You can read more about the UN's panel of experts on human rights in Sri Lanka here.

'Calling cards' of the country

Creative industries debate

Ed Vaizey
BBC

Minister Ed Vaizey says the UK is lucky with the creative industries that exist. 

He says the creative industries have been supported by government, through tax reliefs, for example; and that in a Brexit world the government would work with the creative industries as the "calling cards" of this country. 

He promises that culture and the creative industries are taken account of in a practical way.

Influential friends

Parliamentary reporters tweet

Off the top of the head...

Creative industries debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey gets to his feet to sum up - and plays for time while he finds his notes, recalling that Mr Hopkins is a part-time jazz musician...and that Mr Hopkins was the MP who followed him after his maiden speech in 2005...

He recalls the opening speech in this debate, from Labour MP, Julie Elliott, and then accepts an intervention by Labour MP Wes Streeting - which gives him time to marshall his thoughts.

Britain's success 'must continue'

Creative industries debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Kelvin Hopkins, the new shadow culture secretary, sums up from the Labour despatch box.

He outlines Britain's success in music, film, theatre, dance, broadcasting and other creative industries. 

But he says when it comes to sustaining the success for the future, it is important to support young people. The squeezed budget in local provision means that music could become the preserve of just children with affluent parents, he says.

Digital challenge huge, says SNP

Creative industries debate

The SNP's Pete Wishart reminds people of his interests as a former recording artist. He was in the Scottish Celtic rock band Runrig as a keyboard player.

He says the UK is successful at the creative industries because "we're fantastically good at producing this stuff". An MPs' job is to create the right conditions to allow the sector to thrive and grow.

He says the intellectual property rights of those involved in the creative sector must be protected. The migration onto digital is a huge challenge, he says, and the challenge to design a functioning digital market place is paramount.

"Someone is growing rich from the creative endeavours of our artists - but it's not the artists," he says.

And he worries about what the Brexit vote means for the creative industries: regarding tariffs and the movement of people.

Pete Wishart
BBC

Creative industries as an economic driver

Creative industries debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Prince Charles
PA
The Prince of Wales visited the Royal Ballet School, White Lodge campus in Richmond Park in his role as President of The Royal Ballet last month

According to a Department for Culture, Media and Sport report employment in the creative industries is increasing at twice the national rate; the report found that 92% of jobs in the sector were done by people in "more advantaged socio-economic groups".

Jobs within the creative industries sector increased by 5.5% 2013-14 compared to 2.1% rise nationally. Culture Secretary John Whittingdale said the UK's creative industry was "one of our great success stories". 

In addition, the UK's creative industries generates nearly £9.6m per hour - DCMS figures put the creative industries' worth to the UK at £84.1bn. 

Peers debate economic role of agriculture

Agriculture and horticulture debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative and former environment minister Lord de Mauley opens this afternoon's debate on agriculture and horticulture by saying that there is volatility in farm incomes and the "structures of some of our markets don't help". 

But, he says, British farming's "track record is one of resilience". 

Minister: There will be no second referendum

Second referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Anelay
BBC

"The result wasn't what many of us wanted or campaign for," Foreign Office Minister Baroness Anelay tells peers, but it was "clear".

She says there will be no second referendum. She predicts Parliament's role in the Brexit process is "crucial" and work is already underway to determine how it can best be involved. 

Racist incident causes security alert in Parliament

Tom Bateman

Political Correspondent, Millbank

A Muslim peer has told the BBC a security alert at Parliament was caused after he was sent an envelope containing white powder and a racially offensive message. 

Lord Ahmed of Rotherham said he opened the envelope in his office this afternoon when he made the discovery. 

He said white powder spilled over him and the envelope contained a note with the words "paki filth". 

Lord Ahmed said he alerted the parliamentary authorities before later being told to stay where he was as it was being treated as a chemical or biological incident. He said he has since been informed the powder is harmless but that an investigation is being carried out into the threat. 

 He said he was "concerned" by what happened and said had been targeted by racist messages around a dozen times before - he believes because of his status as the first Muslim life peer in the House of Lords. 

 A parliamentary entrance was earlier sealed off as an investigation was carried out.  

View more on twitter

Labour: We must honour referendum result

Second referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Collins
BBC

Labour spokesman Lord Collins of Highbury says that although the referendum "polarised" opinion, "what is not in doubt is the final outcome, which of course must be honoured". 

He argues there was a "clear" option on the Remain side but not on the Leave side. Nonetheless the government must enter negotiations "in good faith and get the best for the British people". 

Lib Dems: There is a question about what we voted on

Second referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Smith
BBC

Lib Dem spokesperson Baroness Smith of Newnham says her party "absolutely respects the outcome" of the referendum. 

However, she adds, there is a distinction between a rerun of the EU referendum and a referendum on a Brexit deal. 

"There is a real question about what we voted on," she says, "especially since there is no agreement between those who advocated leaving."

'Innovative and successful'

Parliamentary reporters tweet

Debate on creative industries begins

House of Commons

Parliament

We're on to the next debate: support for the UK's creative industries and their contribution to the economy. It's being opened by Julie Elliot, the Labour MP for Sunderland Central.

'Platforms must work with government'

Online abuse debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Ed Vaizey
BBC

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey begins by praising Maria Miller for her work in bringing the issue of online abuse to the attention of the House.

He says when it comes to the online world there are companies that are "bigger and more influential than many nation states" and he says they are left to their own devices, without rules or regulation.

"Clearly platforms have to work with government and civic society to create rules," he says, and he advocates a clear code of conduct in the UK.

He says, as well, that swift reactions are needed from platforms, so that distressed constituents who want help can get results.

Peer reflects on losing elections

Second referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Lord Grocott tells the House: "I have some experience of losing elections.

"When you lose, your opponent lied. When you win - it's a triumph of British democracy." 

He says while he respects Baroness King's views, a second referendum would be seen as a betrayal. 

Referendum rerun would be 'dangerous'

Second referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Constitutional historian and Conservative Lord Norton of Louth says rerunning the referendum would be a "dangerous path to pursue" and could "undermine trust". 

He tells peers it is "misleading" to describe the referendum as advisory, and the question of another referendum "is not for now" but could be for the future once Brexit negotiations have taken place. 

Support and protection needed for 'digital citizens'

Online abuse debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's Chi Onwurah says she spends a lot of time outside the House talking about the positive aspects to technology and the Internet. But the increase in online abuse means it is a place where people "do not feel safe".

Citizens feel the right to walk down the street without being harassed and attacked; and digital citizens should have the same rights. "Digital citizens deserve digital rights," she says - and claims the government is failing to provide that.

"We cannot just look at what we have now and try to patch the problem," she says. Companies are too slow to take the initiative too, she explains. 

Too often, she says, the industry blames parents if their children find porn online; or women were accused of being too sensitive if they were abused online. 

'Totally clear' there will be no second referendum, peer claims

Second referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Earl Caithness
BBC

Conservative peer the Earl of Caithness objects to the premise of the debate, saying the government has made it "totally clear" there will be no second referendum and "there is nothing more to add or subtract". 

He says that having been involved in the Scottish and EU referendums, he found them "divisive, destructive - and I don't want to do that again". 

Check Hansard...

PA's parliamentary editor tweets

Second referendum would be 'fair and democratic'

Second referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness King
BBC

Labour's Baroness King of Bow opens her debate on the case for a second referendum by saying she accepts that leaving the EU is the will of the people. 

But, she adds, it's "only fair and democratic" that people get another referendum once a Brexit deal has been agreed. 

She suggests voters were not aware of what would follow the referendum, which Conservative Lord Robathan suggests could be seen as "patronising". 

Governments are often asked to reconsider their legislation, whether by judicial review, or legislative amendments in the Commons or Lords, she argues. 

Condemnation of abuse directed at female MPs

Online abuse debate

House of Commons

Parliament

The SNP's Margaret Ferrier says the scale of online abuse is shocking. She says misogynist and abusive tweets are sent to women; and says what was truly shocking was the often co-ordinated nature of abuse.

She commends the Department of Education's efforts to combat the effect of online abuse and cyber bullying. "Equality training is an important measure in our schools," she says, advocating LGBT training for teachers.

Gavin Newlands, the SNP MP from Paisley and Renfewshire North, says he has had abuse, but the worst abuse is reserved for female members of Parliament - and he says that although the abusers are frequently men, they are not "real men"; "they are small and pathetic".

The rise of internet and social media has made it easier for women to be attacked online, and revenge porn is on the rise, he says, and he compares it to incidents of domestic violence.

Gavin Newlands
BBC

Business minister: Look beyond civil service for Brexit process

Trade opportunities debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Business Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe responds for the government, acknowledging the need to "seize the initiative and rise to the occasion" in reestablishing trade links after Brexit.

She highlights the cut in corporation tax and the new Brexit unit at Whitehall. 

She predicts the government will need to look outside the civil service for talent and academics will be able to make a difference in negotiating new trade relationships. 

Labour calls for bold approach to trade

Trade opportunities debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Mendelsohn
BBC

Winding up, Labour's business spokesman Lord Mendelsohn calls on the government to be "bold" and "rise to this new level of threat and opportunity". 

He argues for more overseas posts dedicated to trade links and for an expanded group of ministers to work on this effort. 

"We need to scale up," he tells peers, as the UK aims to establish new bilateral trade relationships. 

Much of abuse 'from male sources'

BBC Today in Parliament's reporter tweets

Single market access 'most important'

EU referendum

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Burt
BBC

Lib Dem business spokesperson Baroness Burt of Solihull advises that after the referendum "we have got to strike out at new or underdeveloped markets". 

She says there was a lack of strategy before the referendum, and government should "stop reacting and start planning to help industry". 

Access to the single market "is the most important thing we should be striving for", she adds.

Foreign Secretary answers Brexit questions

Foreign Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Philip Hammond has been giving evidence to the Foreign Affairs Committee today, on the implications for the UK following the vote to leave the EU in last month's referendum.

Under questioning, he argued against giving EU nationals a promise that they can remain in the UK because the government needed a reciprocal arrangement for UK nationals living overseas.  

He also told MPs on the committee that it was not in the UK's best interests to "set the clock ticking" now on EU negotiations, before there is a prime minister in place to begin substantive talks.  

He suggested EU politicians are more sympathetic than officials, who are calling for Article 50 to be invoked now. Also, he told the committee that a parliamentary vote on leaving would be needed at some point.

Leave supporters on the committee, including the Conservative chairman Crispin Blunt and Conservative John Baron, accused Mr Hammond of still adhering to "Project Fear and Denial" and told him to "move on".

And, as the senior political correspondent at Buzzfeed tweets about questions on pre-Brexit planning:

View more on twitter
View more on twitter

Terrible accounts reported

Parliamentary reporters tweet

Manufacturing analyst urges competitive mindset

Trade opportunities debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Bhattacharyya
BBC

Labour's Lord Bhattacharyya, a professor of manufacturing at Warwick University, fears that Brexit will create "major issues for manufacturing".

He says it creates a new impetus to "reach out to create new global partners" and create "a mindset of competitiveness". 

Referendum could allow 'nimble' trade, peer argues

Trade opportunities debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Mobarik
BBC

Conservative Baroness Mobarik, a former chair of CBI Scotland, is opening a debate on global opportunities for trade and of the case for a comprehensive strategy to encourage Britain’s businesses internationally.

She says "we are entering a period of significant change" and it is "imperative we maintain our access to the single market". 

"Going it alone may allow us to be nimble and flexible," she adds. 

Debate on online abuse begins

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Maria Miller is now introducing the Backbench business debate on online abuse.

Ms Miller has called for a review of laws surrounding the "significantly increasing" problem of online abuse.

Ms Miller, chair of the Commons women and equalities committee, said police found it "incredibly difficult" to make current laws work.

She added it was time to get tough on social media networks too, which treat online space as the "Wild West".

Peer warns of Brexit effect on academia

Oral questions

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Sharp
BBC

Lib Dem Baroness Sharp of Guildford is asking about the effect of the referendum on participation of UK universities in Horizon 2020 research collaborations and the Erasmus Programme.

Lady Sharp says there is "anecdotal evidence of researchers being asked to stand down" from European projects and this could "hit our soft power influences".

Government spokesperson Baroness Evans of Bowes Park replies there should be "no immediate effect" on universities, UK academics should not be discriminated against and the government will remain "vigilant". 

European academic bodies are pulling back from research collaboration with UK academics, amid post-Brexit uncertainty about the future of UK higher education, a recent Newsnight report suggested.  

Highlighting peers' contributions

Professor of Public Law, Cambridge University, tweets

Report on Russia report presented to MPs

Select Committee Statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Victory Day parade
AFP
The RS-24 Yars missile can hit targets 11,000km (6,835 miles) away with four independent nuclear warheads

The Defence Committee chair, Julian Lewis, is now presenting his select committee report called: Russia: Implications for UK defence and security.

He says it highlights the need to focus on defence, deterrence and diaglogue.

Motoring offences review to go ahead

Oral questions

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Berkeley
BBC

Proceedings begin with a question from Labour's Lord Berkeley, who is asking about a government review of motoring offences and penalties.

The government announced in 2014 it would conduct a review of motoring offences and penalties.

Lord Berkeley wants to know when the public consultation will happen, complaining it has taken too long.

Justice Minister Lord Faulks says the criticism is "fair" and it is going ahead within a wider sentencing review.  

Business in the Lords

Coming up...

House of Lords

Parliament

The Lords begins at 11am with questions on:

  • a government review of motoring offences and penalties
  • television broadcasting of the 2016 Paralympic Games
  • increasing in the maximum penalty imposed by magistrates
  • the effect of the referendum on UK universities.

That's followed by four short debates covering global opportunities for trade, the case for a second EU referendum, the role of agriculture and horticulture play in the economy, and working with other nations to address large movements of refugees and migrants.

SNP welcomes Chilcot debate

Business statement

The Royal Navy's nuclear submarine - HMS Vanguard - is 150 metres long
PA
The Royal Navy's nuclear submarine - HMS Vanguard - is 150 metres long

The SNP's Pete Wishart welcomes the two-day debate on the Chilcot report, but asks for a debate on the EU referendum.

And he calls for a debate and decision over the renewal of Trident, the decision on which has been in the offing for some time.