Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. First day back after summer recess
  2. Commons started with Home Office questions
  3. Hilary Benn asked an urgent question on Yemen, followed by statements on Brexit and junior doctors
  4. The Finance Bill completed its progress through the House of Commons.
  5. Peers examined the Investigatory Powers Bill

Live Reporting

By Esther Webber and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

Get involved

End of Commons Business

House of Commons

Parliament

And with that business in the House of Commons is brought to a close.

MPs will be back tomorrow at 11.30am for Justice questions with the new Justice Secretary, Liz Truss.

'Have to be realistic about how much we can change the past'

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Economic Secretary to the Treasury Simon Kirby says that while the debt racked up by PFI is an important issue he points out that of the nearly 700 PFI projects in the UK, 639 were secured before the Conservatives came into government.

"We have to be realistic about how much we can change in the past".

But the government it is "doing what we can to make sure these projects run as efficiently as possible" he adds.

He argues that the government have "improved the overall system for projects".

PFIs 'draining public services'

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Stella Creasy
BBC

While PFIs can be "seductive" for cash strapped government, "not only because it spreads payments, and it keeps them off the books", Stella Creasy argues PFIS are, "draining our public services of much needed money".

PFIs are the "equivalent of getting a mortgage or re-mortgaging your home" but at a far higher rate the Labour MP explains.

PFI projects projects in the UK are worth a collective £57bn but "we are committed to paying back £232bn by 2050" she tells MPs.

The UK is currently paying £10bn a year in PFI payments, she tells MPs.

MP warns against using PFIs

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

We now move to the day's final business, the adjournment debate- today on Private Finance Initiatives (PFIs), led by Labour MP Stella Creasy. 

Ms Creasy is warning the government against using PFIs to help fill a funding gap in infrastructure, even though funding in "infrastructure is nosediving since Brexit".

Budget Bill set to become law

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

And with that the Finance Bill completes its progress through the House of Commons, effectively becoming law. 

The bill will pass through the House of Lords, but as a Money Bill peers have no power to amend it.

Once passed by the Commons will become law after one month, with or without the approval of the House of Lords, under the terms of the Parliament Acts.  

Tampon tax amendment defeated

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have rejected Paula Sheriff's amendment calling for the "tampon tax" to be scrapped by 2018, by 291 votes to 235.

Tampon Tax amendment would breach international obligations

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's tampon tax amendment would force the UK to act illegally, Financial Secretary to the Treasury Jane Ellison argues.

While there is "no great difference between our intention and that of the honourable members opposite" she says the government will oppose the amendment as it "brings us into breach of our obligations" in Article 1 and Article 110 of EU Principle VAT Directive.

The government instead plan to cut the Tampon tax at "the earliest date consistent with our legal obligations" she adds.  

Tampon tax amendments

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Paula Sherriff,
BBC

MPs now turn to a Labour amendment calling for the so-called tampon tax to be scrapped by 2018.

Labour MP Paula Sherriff, who tabled the amendment, is also calling on the government to publish a report on the revenue raised from VAT on women’s sanitary products since 1 January 2001.

Before the Brexit vote EU leaders agreed a deal to allow the UK to scrap the tax.

VAT is currently charged at the reduced rate of 5% on sanitary products.Existing EU rules had prevented the UK from reducing the tax rate to zero.

Though the UK has voted to leave the EU, Ms Sherriff argues "there should be no barrier to banish this tax".

Tax gap amendment rejected

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have rejected an amendment requiring the government to publish an annual report on the tax gap - the difference between the amount of tax it should collect in theory, and the actual total.

In the year to April 2013, the gap rose to £34bn, from £33bn the year before.

The amendment would require the Treasury to publish historical records on tax gaps dating back to 2011.

All votes counted the Labour amendment was defeated by 304 votes to 245.

Scottish Limited Partnerships amendment defeated

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted to reject the SNPs amendment on winding down the use of Scottish Limited Partnerships by 304 votes to 248.

Government support Flint amendment

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Financial Secretary to the Treasury, Jane Ellison, says the government will support Caroline Flint's amendment - guaranteeing it will become law.

The UK has led international efforts on tax avoidance and the amendment is "in keeping with this aim", Ms Ellison argues.

Financial Secretary to the Treasury, Jane Ellison
BBC

Labour support for country-by-country reporting amendment

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow chief secretary to the Treasury, Rebecca Long-Bailey, adds Labour's support to Caroline Flint's amendment.

She argues that measure will "strengthen the UK's influence on international transparency negotiations and it will help build an international consensus".

The amendment has support from several Conservative MPs, including David Nuttall, Anne Marie Trevelyan and Philip Hollobone, as well as support from Green Party leader Caroline Lucas, the SNP and SDLP MP Mark Durkan.

Country-by-country reporting

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Caroline Flint
BBC

Labour MP Caroline Flint is tabling an amendment to force multinational corporations to disclose where they do business.    

Ms Flint, who is tabling the amendment as a member of the Public Accounts Committee, tells MPs secrecy and complexity are "the weapons" of wealthy multinationals, who create shell companies to shift money around the world. 

This allows them to report or shelter their profits in low or no tax dominions.

The effect is to minimise the tax contribution in the very countries where they have most employees, apparently doing the most business, she argues.

Under the amendment the government would have the power to introduce public country-by-country reporting, but doesn’t force their hand over when to use it.

SNP call for end of Scottish tax evasion vehicle

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

SNP Treasury Spokesman Roger Mullin
BBC

MPs now move to an SNP amendment calling on the government to look at banning Scottish Limited Partnerships (SLPs)

SNP Treasury Spokesman Roger Mullin says SLPs were introduced in 1907 by Herbert Asquith but have become "financial vehicle abused by international criminals and tax dodgers".

SLPs are able to hold assets, borrow money and enter into contracts and allow owners to hide their identity.

"Up to 95% of them are tax vehicles" often owned by partners based in "low or no tax regimes" Mr Mullin argues.

Labour amendment rejected

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have rejected Labour's amendment to limit the reduction of corporation tax to 18%, by 309 votes to 252.

The budget will reduce the headline rate of corporation tax - currently 20% - to 17% by 2020. The level for 2017 has already been reduced.  

Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing delivers the results of the vote
BBC
Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing delivers the results of the vote

End of business in the Lords

House of Lords

Parliament

That brings the day's business in the Lords to a close. Peers return tomorrow at 2.30pm when ministers face questions:

  • detention and executions in Iran undefined
  • reuniting children in the camps of Calais and Dunkirk with their families in the UK
  • meeting the tests set out by the Committee on Climate Change on fracking
  • Southern Rail.undefined

NHS provides 'excellent' HIV care, minister insists

HIV infection debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Winding up for the government, Health Minister Lord Prior of Brampton says that although he would like the NHS to provide new drugs to prevent HIV infection and Hepatitis C, "we don't have the money to always spend in the way we would like.

He stresses that the NHS "does provide excellent treatment and care", but goes on to acknowledge the rates of undiagnosed HIV are "still too high".

SNP amendment defeated

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Tellers deliver the results of the vote on the SNP's amendment
BBC
Tellers deliver the results of the vote on the SNP's amendment

MPs have voted to reject the SNP's New Clause 5, which would require the government to carry out a review of the corporation tax rates and investment allowances applicable to companies producing oil and gas in the UK, by 304 votes to 249.

In the Budget it was announced that the supplementary charge for oil and gas producers would be halved from 20% to 10%.

Sex education could improve HIV awareness - Labour

HIV infection debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Hunt
BBC

Shadow health spokesman Lord Hunt of Kings Heath says that while HIV is a global issue, "it remains a major challenge in the UK".

He agrees with Lord Black that the question of improving diagnosis rates is "a very important one".

He adds that awareness about HIV should be part of sex and relationship education, and he doesn't think it's right that it's only taught in certain schools.

Prep can be 'highly effective', peer argues

HIV infection debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher and doctor Lord Patel warns it is a "false economy" for councils to say they cannot pay for HIV prevention drug Prep, as they will later have to pay for the care of those infected.

He says studies show that Prep is "highly effective" and there is "little evidence" that its use would discourage the use of other forms of protection such as condoms.

HIV drug 'gave me the confidence to trust again'

Harry Dodd
BBC

To look at, pre-exposure prophylaxis (Prep for short) is a small, blue pill - but it's caused a big controversy.

The drug is not currently available on the NHS - and an NHS England decision to that effect has caused a well-documented outcry from charities and campaigners alike.

However, about 500 homosexual men in England - who form part of a trial called Proud - have been taking it for years while experts monitor its effects.

Read more.

'We are at a crossroads' in HIV policy - peer

HIV infection debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Scriven
BBC

Lib Dem peer Lord Scriven says the UK is "now at a crossroads" in public policy on tackling HIV infection.

He highlights the ruling by the High Court last month that the NHS in England can fund a drug that can prevent HIV, pre-exposure prophylaxis (Prep).

He argues it's "very clear" the health secretary can order the NHS to commission Prep and demands to know why he hasn't done so.

Peer calls for improved HIV diagnosis rates

HIV infection debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Black
BBC

Peers move on to the final business of the day, with Conservative Lord Black of Brentwood opening his debate on moving toward the elimination of HIV infection in the United Kingdom.

He says that although the diagnosis has gone from being "a death sentence to a chronic manageable condition" the situation in the UK is "deteriorating and we need tough and determined action". 

He points out that "too many" do not know they are HIV positive, and therefore cannot begin taking anti-retrovirals or take steps to prevent infecting others.

Corporation tax cuts

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are debating a series of loosely related amendments around the cutting of corporation tax.

First up though is an SNP amendment to cut corporation tax rates for oil and gas companies to a level decided by a newly created government review.

Oil rig in the north sea
BBC

Tonight's agenda...

PA's parliamentary editor tweets

MPs debate budget measures

Finance Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Budget 2016
PA

Slightly later than scheduled, MPs now turn to the day's legislation - the final stages of the Finance Bill - the measure which enacts the 2016 Budget.

If the timetable is adhered to MPs are due to debate the cutting of the headline rate of corporation tax to 17%, new measures to tackle tax evasion and plans to scrap the “tampon tax”.

Secondary legislation will not be used to undermine oversight, government pledges

Investigatory Powers Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Earl Howe
BBC

Government spokesman Earl Howe rejects Labour's attempt to prevent the role of the investigatory powers commissioner being altered through secondary legislation. 

He says changes made in this way would not undermine the commissioner's oversight function, but "may be entirely neutral".

He adds that if Labour's amendment were accepted, these "sensible" changes would not be possible.

Government should listen, like the BMA

Junior doctors strike

House of Commons

Parliament

Former A&E junior doctor and current Labour MP Dr Rosena Allin-Khan
BBC

Former A&E junior doctor and current Labour MP Dr Rosena Allin-Khan says today the BMA has "listened and put patient safety first" and calls on the government to do the same.

Many doctors are "leaving for Australia and further afield" due to the risk of "having the contract imposed on them".

"You cannot create a safe seven day NHS on a stretched five day budget," she argues.

Jeremy Hunt says he has been listening and negotiated a deal that was originally accepted by the BMA.

Labour seeks to prevent secondary legislation on investigatory powers

Investigatory Powers Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Wires on computer
Thinkstock

Labour spokesman Lord Rosser introduces an amendment which would prevent the secretary of state from modifying the role of the investigatory powers commissioner through regulations.

He cites concerns raised by the Delegated Powers and Regulatory Reform Committee, which suggested it would be "inappropriate" to change the commissioner's responsibilities without primary legislation. 

The bill creates a new body of commissioners, headed by the Investigatory Powers Commissioner, responsible for overseeing the use of all investigatory powers.

'Can’t keep patients safe'

Junior doctors strike

House of Commons

Parliament

Chair of the Health Select Committee Dr Sarah Wollaston
BBC

The chair of the Health Committee, Dr Sarah Wollaston, argues that you "can’t keep patients safe with rolling five day strikes".

This is why many junior doctors have contacted her to oppose the strikes, she says.

She calls on the BMA to ballot members to "hear their views before proceeding with damaging walkouts".

Jeremy Hunt agrees. "I do think they should talk to their own members about this," he says.

Most junior doctors are “perplexed and worried about the situation they are in”, he argues.

'Recognise the anger'

Junior doctors statement

House of Commons

Parliament

SNP Health Spokesperson Dr Philippa Whitford
BBC

SNP health spokesperson Dr Philippa Whitford asks Jeremy Hunt to "recognise the anger that has led us to this point".

This has been caused by "the threat of imposition" hanging over the negotiations since last summer and the "misuse of numerical, statistical data to suggest there had been avoidable deaths at the weekend" when there has been "no proof for this".

The real problem is "rota gaps" leading to many doctors doing two shifts, she argues.

Jeremy Hunt calls on Dr Whitford to provide proof of misused numbers. It would be irresponsible for the government to "ignore those numbers backed up in study after study", he adds. 

Ex-Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (L) and ex-Permanent Under-Secretary at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office Simon Fraser, 8 May 15 file photo

The UK government will have to hire new civil servants to cope with the "phenomenally large task" of negotiating Brexit, a former top diplomat says.

Read more

'Indefensible anomaly'

Junior doctors statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Former Conservative health secretary Ken Clarke says it is an "indefensible anomaly" that the NHS reduces its services at the weekend "when the patients it serves are vulnerable....seven days a week". 

He adds that it is "almost inconceivable that at any time in the past such extreme and militant action would have been supported by either the BMA or the Labour party".

Jeremy Hunt says that the government must accept the junior doctors rejected this new deal, but the choice to push this to the worst strike in NHS history is "indefensible".

'Complete breakdown of trust'

Junior doctors statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow health secretary Diane Abbott
BBC

Shadow health secretary Diane Abbott says the current situation "shows there has been a complete break down of trust between junior doctors and the government".

She accuses the Mr Hunt of "continuing not to take responsibility for the current state of affairs".

The public "does not buy the government's attempts to demonise junior doctors", she adds.

Instead, the public is looking for the secretary of state to "meet the reasonable demands" of the BMA, she adds.

Junior doctors' concerns

Junior doctors statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Jeremy Hunt says it is clear that for BMA negotiators the argument was "largely about pay".

But for the vast majority of junior doctors "it is around a wider series of concerns" - including training and the gender pay gap - which Mr Hunt says the government is looking to address outside the new contract. 

Hospitals will 'bust a gut'

Junior Doctors statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Jeremy Hunt says he cannot give an absolute guarantee of patient safety.

But, he adds, hospitals "up and down the country will bust a gut to look after their patients in this unprecedented situation".

Strike is 'damaging for patients'

Junior doctors statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt
BBC

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt says he welcomes the news the first strike will be delayed.

This must not "obscure the fact" that the remaining planned industrial actions "will be damaging for patients, some of which will already have operations cancelled".

Up to 100,000 elective operations will be cancelled and a million hospital appointments will be postponed.

He notes that many NHS organisations - including NHS England, and NHS providers -  have expressed concern about the potential impact on patient safety and "questioned whether escalating strikes is a proportionate or reasonable response".

Back to the bill

Investigatory Powers Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers now resume committee-stage scrutiny of the Investigatory Powers Bill.

The bill is described as

A Bill to make provision about the interception of communications, equipment interference and the acquisition and retention of communications data, bulk personal datasets and other information; to make provision about the treatment of material held as a result of such interception, equipment interference or acquisition or retention; to establish the Investigatory Powers Commissioner and other Judicial Commissioners and make provision about them and other oversight arrangements; to make further provision about investigatory powers and national security; to amend sections 3 and 5 of the Intelligence Services Act 1994; and for connected purposes.

MPs clash during EU referendum debate
The SNP's Ian Blackford clashes with Conservative James Gray during a debate he is chairing on calls for a second EU referendum - resulting in Mr Blackford being asked to sit down.

Junior doctors' strike

Junior doctors statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Junior doctors on strike
PA
Junior doctors will still stage a series of strikes in the next three months

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is beginning his statement on junior doctors' industrial action.

Today, the British Medical Association has called off the junior doctors' strike due to take place in England next week amid concerns about patient safety.

Junior doctors have planned strikes over the imposition of a new contract, which changes the way doctors will be paid for weekend and out of hours work.

The first of four five-day walkouts was due to begin from 12 to 16 September, with the last being in mid-December.

The BMA said it was not backing down in the fight over a new contract.