Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. Justice Secretary Liz Truss answering MPs' questions
  2. PMQs at noon
  3. Statement on G20 summit
  4. Labour-led debate on Paris Agreement on climate change
  5. Peers questioned government on grammar schools
  6. Home Secretary appeared before MPs
  7. Peers debated Investigatory Powers Bill

Live Reporting

By Esther Webber, Sam Francis, Kate Whannel and Iain McDowell

All times stated are UK

Get involved

End of Lords business

House of Lords

Parliament

And with that Business in the House of Lords is brought to a close.

Peers will be back at 11.30 am tomorrow for oral questions on:

  • The impact of Brexit on the future of the Belfast Agreement
  • Addressing the gap between the remuneration of senior executives and their employees  
  • UK financial institutions and bailout funds to the government of Zimbabwe
  • EU withdrawal and requirements of the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010.

Falsifying beliefs

Investigatory Powers Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Hamwee questions why the "permitted period" within which the head of the intelligence service can apply for a bulk powers warrant begins "when they form certain beliefs".

"How it can be established that someone had formed a belief" she asks, and argues that it is easy to falsify when a belief was formed.

Home Office Minister Lord Keen of Elie replies that despite the potential ambiguity there is "not a way for the security to work around" checks and balances as it is in "nobodies interest to delay applying for a warrant".

Warrants for bulk powers are only active after the end of the "permitted period". 

'Copying and pasting chunks of wording in my head'

Investigatory Powers Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem peer Baroness Hamwee
BBC

After a short adjournment peers return to the Investigatory Powers Bill.

First up, and amendment from Lib Dem peer Baroness Hamwee to "try and make sense" of the clauses around modifying bulk data collection orders.

Baroness Hamwee tells peers she has tried to understand what the legislation will do but ends up "copying and pasting chunks of wording in my head".

The offending clause 1515, Defence Minister Earl Howe explains, would allow an order to be modified so that it no longer allowed the gathering of information but allowed pre-gathered data to remain accessible "if pertinent".

'One person without a home is one too many'

Homelessness debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Responding to the debate Communities Minister Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth says "the government maintains committed to ensuring that homeless people always have a roof over their head".

Since 2010 the government have invested over £500m in homeless prevention measures, he tells peers. 

And while "one person without a home is one too many" homelessness acceptances "are less than half their 2003 peak" he argues.

Big Issue Founder: Education is main issue

Homelessness debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Big Issue founder Lord Bird
BBC

Big Issue founder Lord Bird argues that the "main issue" around homelessness is being avoided - that "we fail 30% of our children in school".

The crossbench peer says around 95% of homeless people come from this group with "the same social background".

If "your parents are on social security" and "you were failed at school.. you will have to rely on the university of the streets" for your education, he argues.

These groups then go on to "produce another generation of people who become homeless" he says.

The government should be spending "£50bn on education and breaking open the 30% of children who will go on to fill our prisons and streets and social security streams", he says. The current education budget is around £19bn.

'Anyone of use could be homeless' says peer

Homelessness debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour peer Lord Cashman
BBC

Labour peer Lord Cashman declares that he has a stake in this debate as he "could be homeless".

"Any single one of us could be homeless" he tells peers as "homelessness often affects people in circumstances beyond their control".  

He says that he was "born and brought up in a council estate in London's East End".

"That would be considered a luxury today."

Keeping pressure on the government

Homelessness debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Shadow communities minister Lord Kennedy
BBC

Shadow communities minister Lord Kennedy of Southwark says "it is truly shameful that people in this city don't have a roof over their head".

In 2015 "3,569 were sleeping rough on any given night somewhere in England", double the number in 2010 Lord Kennedy argues.

The Labour peer says he tabled this debate as "we have to keep raising the issues and pressing the government to end this scandal".

Peers debate plans to tackle homelessness

Homelessness debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers now move to the dinner break debate, today shadow communities minister Lord Kennedy of Southwark on government plans to deal with homelessness.

Opening the debate the Labour peer notes that today's debate takes place "in one of the richest cities in the world, in a palace".

New offence for 'misuse of bulk powers' needed, say peer.

Investigatory powers bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Former Cabinet Secretary Lord Butler of Brockwell i
BBC

Former Cabinet Secretary Lord Butler of Brockwell is tabling an amendment to create a specific crime of "misuse of intrusive bulk powers" resulting in up to 12 months in jail.

Other crimes - such as the misuse of interception powers or communications data - are already offences under other legislation.

But the misuse of bulk powers is "only a minor offence under the Data Protection Act" which could result only in an "internal disciplinary matter", the crossbench peer says,

The amendment was originally suggested by the cross-parliamentary Intelligence and Security Committee.

Home Office Minister Lord Keen or Elie argues that creating new statutory offences "may unnecessarily inhibit intelligence staff and limit their ability to act with confidence".

Lord Butler agrees to withdraw his amendment, but suggests he may return to it at a later stage.

End of business in the Commons

House of Commons

Parliament

That's it for today in the Commons - MPs return tomorrow at 9.30am for questions to culture, media and sport ministers, and to ministers for international trade. 

Government defends funding of Garden Bridge

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Transport Minister Andrew Jones says he realises the Garden Bridge "divides public opinion".

He tells MPs the government decided to support it as "an innovative and iconic project" but always believed it should not be wholly funded with public money.

Ministers were convinced it would provide "value for money for the taxpayer" but set conditions such as: an outline by TfL and the Garden Bridge Trust of how funds would be spent. 

'It's me again' - Lord Paddick

House of Lords

Parliament

"I do apologise, its me again." says Lord Paddick as he rises again.

His amendment (201ZD) states that the Judicial Commissioner should approve or reject a "major modification" to a bulk interception warrant within three working days, rather than the five currently stipulated in the bill.

Lord Keen of Elie says he is sympathetic to the amendment and promises to consider them.

Lord Paddick
BBC

Peers debate a 'cornucopia of amendments'

Investigatory Powers Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Paddick rises again to speak to, in his words, "a cornucopia of amendments".

His group of amendments requires the security and intelligence agencies to continually review the operational purpose of each bulk warrant issued.

This, he argues, would ensure that the agencies can monitor when a warrant is no longer necessary.

Government spokesman Earl Howe says codes of practice already insist that bulk warrants are kept under ongoing review.

House of Lords
BBC

Garden Bridge is 'a vanity project' - MP

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Garden bridge
Heatherwick

Labour MP Kate Hoey begins her adjournment debate by describing the Garden Bridge as "a vanity project".

The project in central London was championed by Boris Johnson as London mayor and by George Osborne as chancellor.  

Transport Secretary Chris Grayling is due to decide whether to extend a £15m government underwriting of the £175m project until September 2017.

EU countries should ratify Paris Agreement together - minister

Opposition day debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Jesse Norman
BBC

Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Minister Jesse Norman is responding to the debate for the government.

He accuses Labour of "manufactured indignation" in its claims that the government is "lagging" on ratification of the Paris Agreement on climate change. 

He says it is not an issue to be approached in "a narrowly partisan way" and "this country has long exercised global leadership in this area". 

He welcomes other countries' moves towards early ratification and says the government remains "committed" to the process but insists the convention is that all EU member states must ratify at the same time. 

Minister 'joins the dots'

Investigatory Powers Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem Lord Paddick moves an amendment which would require the Secretary of State to consider the local law before approving a warrant for a bulk interception from an overseas operator. 

Government spokesman Lord Keen of Elie argues that the amendment is not needed because the bill already requires the government to take into account the law of another country.

Lord Paddick thanks the minister for "joining the dots" to the relevant parts of the legislation. He withdraws his amendment. 

Labour condemns government approach to ratifying Paris Agreement

Opposition day debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Bill Esterson
BBC

Shadow energy minister Bill Esterson is winding up the debate for Labour, in which the party has accused the government of "lagging behind its G20 partners in ratifying the Paris Agreement". 

He describes the government's approach as "woeful" and echoes concerns expressed earlier about a potential "loss of influence" in this area after Brexit. 

In 2015, nearly 200 countries reached a deal to attempt to limit the rise in global temperatures to less than 2C, now known as the Paris Agreement.  

The measures in the agreement include:

  • To peak greenhouse gas emissions as soon as possible and achieve a balance between sources and sinks of greenhouse gases in the second half of this century
  • To keep global temperature increase "well below" 2C (3.6F) and to pursue efforts to limit it to 1.5C
  • To review progress every five years
  • $100 billion a year in climate finance for developing countries by 2020, with a commitment to further financing in the future 

Government 'considering' new technology board

Investigatory Powers Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Defence Minister Earl Howe says the government is "giving careful consideration" to David Anderson's proposals on a new technology board.

The Conservative peer says he "completely agrees with the assessment that those accessing bulk powers must be alert to the impact of technological change".

Following David Anderson's report there "can be no question that operational case of bulk powers has been made" Earl Howe notes.

Lord Rosser agrees to withdraw his amendment on the understanding the debate will continue.

Defence Minister Earl Howe
BBC

New technologies board should have 'broader powers', says peer

Investigatory Powers Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, Lord Carlile of Berriew, calls for a more ambition with the proposed new technologies board.

The Liberal Democrat peer argues the "advisory panel" should have a "broader scope", but with the increased powers should become "more acceptably accountable".

He suggests that the panel should be appointed by the home secretary and "through the secretary of state be accountable to Parliament".

This new board would "add considerably without placing undue burdens on the security services".

Former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, Lord Carlile of Berriew
BBC

Abolition of energy department makes climate change 'less visible'

Opposition day debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Nia Griffith
BBC

Labour's Nia Griffith calls on the government to come up with a timetable for ratifying the Paris Agreement on climate change "as soon as possible".

She says it's all the more urgent given the abolition of the Department of Energy and Climate Change, which she predicts "will make climate change less visible". 

She goes on to welcome the inclusion of industrial strategy in the name of the new department, saying she hopes it means the government is "serious" about it. 

Labour: Board needed to monitor spies' use of new technologies

Investigatory Powers Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour home office minister Lord Rosser i
BBC

Labour's home office spokesman Lord Rosser is tabling an amendment to create an "advisory panel" to monitor the impact of changing technologies on the work of the security services.

The proposal is a recommendation made by the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, David Anderson, in his review of the "bulk data gathering powers" in the bill.

Under the amendment, a "technology advisory panel" of industry experts would be appointed by the investigatory powers commission to look at how "MI5, MI6 and GCHQ could reduce the privacy footprint of their activities" when new technologies come to market.

Lord Rosser notes this is the first debate of the bill since the David Anderson's review was published.  

Decision urged on Hinkley Point

Opposition day debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Hinkley Point
Getty Images

A little earlier in today's debate, Conservative MP for Wells James Heappey praised the government's commitment to ratifying the Paris Agreement but said there were areas in which its policy was "not quite so clear".

He described new nuclear as the only form of energy which can "meet our base-load needs".

"We have to take a decision now," he urged, "and put Hinkey forward at the first possible opportunity."

Plans to build the first new UK nuclear plant in 20 years were unexpectedly delayed after the government postponed a final decision until the early autumn.  

Polish ministers 'raised hate crime concerns'

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Poland's foreign and interior ministers have visited the UK to raise concerns over racism against Polish nationals in the wake of the EU referendum, the home secretary says.

Amber Rudd
HoC

Responding to a question from Labour's David Winnick about hate crime incidents, Amber Rudd said she and Foreign Secretary Boris Johnston met the Polish ministers this week.

She adds that they were reassured that the government is taking the matter seriously.

Home Affairs Committee adjourns

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Labour's David Winnick has the final question and asks about incidents of hate crimes since the EU referendum.

Amber Rudd confirms that there was a spike after the vote but that levels have now returned to levels comparable to last year.

And with that Tim Loughton adjourns the sitting.

Home affairs committee
BBC

Home secretary concerned about current prostitution legislation

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Tim Loughton says the final line of questioning will focus on prostitution and notes that there are no declarations of interest.

David Burrowes asks what the home secretary's views are on buying sex from prostitutes.

She replies that it is a complicated issue and would like to consider it further before giving a full answer.

She adds she does have concerns about the current legislation.

Amber Rudd
BBC

What is committee stage?

House of Lords

Parliament

The committee stage is when a lot of the legislative leg work is done in the House of Lords.

A bill is put through detailed line-by-line examination and scrutiny. For major and complex legislation is considered in a committee of the whole House – like today.

All proposed amendments can be considered, and debate on amendments is unrestricted. 

Amendments are rarely put to a vote as there as still two more legislative stages to go before the bill completes its journey through the Lords.

If the bill is passed at committee stage the legislation moves on to report stage, where similar detailed scrutiny also takes place.

Rudd: Social media sites should do more to remove radical material

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

James Berry
BBC

Conservative James Berry asks if "something is amiss" when hundreds of police officers are scouring the internet for extremist material whilst social media sites make money from providing the platform.

Amber Rudd says such companies should do more and that she would like to see an industry regulated board similar to one established on child exploitation.

Mr Berry tells her that his suggestion that social media sites should pay for police time did not go down very well.

Prevent: counter-terrorism programme a success or failure?

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Prevent is part of the government's counter-terrorism strategy, aimed at stopping people from being drawn into or supporting terrorism.

It includes measures to stop "apologists for terrorism" coming to the UK, supporting community campaigns that oppose extremism and provide mentoring for individuals "at risk" of becoming involved in terrorist activity.

Young Muslim extremists
Reuters

The strategy covers "all forms" of terrorism, including far-right extremism.

But it has been heavily criticised, including by the Muslim Council of Britain, which said it had "really failed", particularly on engaging with young Muslims.

Peers scrutinise spy powers bill

Investigatory Powers Bill.

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers now move to the day's main legislating - the penultimate day of committee stage scrutiny on the Investigatory Powers Bill.

This is the latest bill aimed at giving the security services and the police up-to-date powers to monitor activity on the internet.

The bill aims to secure and update the powers contained in the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act (DRIPA), which only made it through Parliament after a clause was added to make it expire at the end of December.

The bill has to be passed before the DRIPA expires otherwise the legal authority for the existing powers will lapse - although there's always the option, in extremis, of passing an emergency mini-bill to continue the existing powers for a couple of months.

Darling: Government must 'set out its stall' on Brexit

G20 Statement

House of Lords

Parliament

Former Labour Chancellor Alistair Darling c
BBC

Former Labour Chancellor Alistair Darling criticises the campaign to Leave the EU for not putting forward any plans for what should happen after Brexit.

The Labour peer warns the UK is "never going to get anywhere" until the government sets out its plans for Brexit.

He calls on the government to give a date by which it will "set out its stall" so "we can have the proper debate in this country that we missed out on two months ago".

Baroness Evans of Bowes Park reiterates Theresa May's comment that the government "will not be giving a running commentary", adding it would be "inappropriate to set out timelines". 

"We want the best deal, not the quickest one." 

Rudd: Prevent has been a success

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Labour's Naz Shah raises the Prevent Programme.

She suggests the counter-terrorism project has been a failure and increased Islamophobia of which "women bear the brunt".

"How does that help build trust?" she asks.

Amber Rudd defends the project and insists that Islamophobia should be seen as a separate issue.

Naz Shah
BBC

Dubs amendment being implemented

G20 Statement

House of Lords

Parliament

Calais Jungle
AFP

Leader of the House of Lords Baroness Evans of Bowes Park tells peers that the government have "begun work to implement the Dubs amendment".

The amendment to the Immigration Act, originally put forward by Lord Dubs, requires the government to arrange for the transfer to the UK and support of unaccompanied refugee children from Europe.  

The Conservative peer announces that "discussions are happening with local authorities" and EU leaders in Greece, France and Italy to "speed up the process".

Earlier today Labour peer Lord Dubs, who came to Britain on the Kindertransport programme for Jewish children, criticised the government over the fact no-one had arrived in the UK under a scheme pledged in May.  

MP calls for more support for families of extremists

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

The questioning turns to counter-extremism, with Conservative MP Nusrat Ghani raising evidence heard by the committee from the families of those who have been radicalised.

She says such family members can feel ostracised, and asks that they be better supported "especially if they are helping us".

Permanent secretary Mark Sedwill responds that the government tries to do this through relationships with local community groups. 

Nusrat Ghani
BBC

Immigration controls 'must be a priority' in Brexit talks

G20 Statement

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Evans of Bowes Park
BBC

Baroness Evans of Bowes Park tells peers that the process of leaving the EU "will not be brief and it will not be straightforward".

But many international leaders have agreed to "work with us to make Brexit a success", she says.

The vote to leave the EU showed it "must be a priority to gain more control on the numbers of people who come here form abroad", she adds. 

Conservative MP questions extent of climate change

Opposition day debate

House of Commons

Parliament

David TC Davies
BBC

Conservative David TC Davies begins by saying he's "very pleased" that industrial strategy is going to be a "key part" of the newly-formed department responsible for energy policy. 

He accepts that climate change does exist and is ongoing, but argues the change over the past 250 years is "not particularly exceptional" and questions the extent to which it is man-made. 

Government 'flying blind' on EU nationals figures - Umunna

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

The chair Tim Loughton suggests the government has "no idea" how many EU nationals are in the country.

The permanent secretary of the Home Office Mark Sedwill disagrees, stating that the department used the ONS figure of 3.2m.

Mr Loughton says the immigration minister has put the figure at 1.2m and, suggests the Home Office should be doing a better job of measuring the numbers.

Chuka Umunna accuses the government of "flying blind" on the issue. 

One year on from government's Syrian promise

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Syrian children
AP

Committee chair Tim Loughton notes that while Amber Rudd has been speaking, her office has said that more than 100 Syrians have today arrived at Stansted Airport to be housed in the UK.

It was a year ago today that David Cameron said the UK would resettle 20,000 of the most vulnerable victims of the Syrian conflict by 2020.  

Miliband: Brexit the 'elephant in the room' on climate change

Opposition day debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Former Labour leader Ed Miliband is on his feet, and describes Brexit as "the elephant in the room" when it comes to British diplomacy on climate change. 

He adds he understands the prime minister doesn't want a running commentary on Brexit, but that "there's a difference between this and a Trappist vow". 

"We've got to engage in the issues," he continues, "and saying 'Brexit means Brexit' doesn't really solve the problem."

"Britain's ability to be a persuader for greater ambition [on tackling climate change] is endangered by Brexit," he warns. 

Ed Miliband
BBC

SNP MP asks if PM has insisted on immigration target

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

The SNP's Stuart McDonald tells the home secretary that he thought she got off to "a great start" when she "appeared to bin" the government's net migration target. 

He asks if the prime minister has since "put her foot down" and insisted the she stick to the target.

Amber Rudd simply repeats her assertion that reducing immigration would take some time.

"By 2020?", asks Mr McDonald.

The home secretary says she will not be drawn further. 

Stuart McDonald
BBC

'Parliament will influence asset prices'

UK Parliament
Getty Images

Mark Carney says that much of what happens to UK-focused asset prices will depend on the decisions Parliament take.

"UK-focused asset prices are going to be crucially important, and we all hope very much positively influenced by the major decisions that Parliament are going to take with respect to our relationship first with Europe and then with the rest of the world, and broader productivity and other strategies that are catalysed by this or are associated with this," he says.