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Summary

  1. Culture questions first item on Commons agenda
  2. Yvette Cooper asks an urgent question on child refugees
  3. Business statement outlines agenda
  4. Backbench debate on Israeli settlements in the occupied Palestinian territories
  5. Debate on governance of FA
  6. Peers meet at 11am
  7. Lords will then examine Commonwealth Development Corporation Bill at all stages

Live Reporting

By Alex Partridge and Kate Whannel

All times stated are UK

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MPs adjourn

House of Commons

Parliament

House of Commons clock
BBC

The debate concludes and that wraps up a busy Brexit-based week in Parliament.

MPs take a break next week but will return on 20 February for questions to the work and pensions secretary, followed by debate of the Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill.

And the Lords will take the Brexit baton, with consideration of the EU (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill for consideration...

Join us then.

Memorial should be next to 'mother of Parliaments'

Holocaust Memorial debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Andrew Percy
BBC

Communities Minister Andrew Percy tells the House that 50 sites across London were considered for the memorial.

However, he says there was a desire for the memorial to be "striking and iconic".

Nowhere is more iconic than next to Westminster, he says.

There could be no more powerful location for the memorial, he adds, than next to "the mother of Parliaments".

On the MP's concerns about congestion, the minister suggests this would be a problem "throughout the capital".

Adjournment debate on Holocaust Memorial begins

House of Commons

Parliament

Victoria Tower Gardens
AFP/Getty Images

Conservative MP Sir Edward Leigh now begins his debate on a proposed Holocaust Memorial Museum.

In January 2016, then prime minister David Cameron announced that a UK Holocaust memorial would be built.

An international design competition was launched and the memorial is planned to be built by the end of 2017.

The national memorial is set to be built in Victoria Tower Gardens, next to the Palace of Westminster.

As a location Edward Leigh argues that the site is "completely unsuited" as it already suffers severe congestion. 

Lords and Brexit Bill news

BBC Journalist tweets

'The clock is ticking'

FA governance debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Tracey Crouch
BBC

The FA's current model does not stand up to scrutiny, argues Sport Minister Tracey Crouch.

However she says she believes today's no confidence motion is "six weeks premature".

She says that the FA has until the end of March to produce a plan to change - "the clock is ticking fast'.

She warns that failure to change will lead to the withdrawal of public money and consideration of legislative options.

MPs pass the vote of no confidence unanimously.

Shadow minister: FA has until April to reform

FA governance debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Rosena Allin-Khan
BBC

Shadow sport minister Rosena Allin-Khan says rigorous governance will improve participation at the grassroots level.

She argues that the current governance is not good enough, and calls for the 122 member FA council to be reduced in size.

This is football's last opportunity to change, she says. 

She says she does not support the no confidence motion and argues that the FA should be given until April to submit plans for change before legislation is considered. 

Labour Lords table amendments to Brexit Bill

Press Association Political Correspondent tweets

MP attacks 'sheer incompetence' of local clubs

FA governance debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's Graham Jones describes the FA's structure "as unfit for purpose" and says "root and branch reform" is needed.

There needs to be "some sense" of the game being managed "for the benefit of all", he says.

Turning to his local club, Blackburn Rovers, he accuses the leadership of "sheer incompetence", with a director who has "no interest in the fans". 

House of Lords adjourns

House of Lords

Parliament

House of Lords clock
BBC

Business in the House of Lords has now ended for the day.

Both houses are off next week, so Peers return on Monday 20th February where they will begin debating the EU (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill.

Still waiting for new shadow Welsh Secretary

BBC Wales Westminster Correspondent:

'Sense of inertia' in FA - Conservative MP

FA governance debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Nigel Huddleston
BBC

Conservative Nigel Huddleston suggests that a foreign observer could be forgiven for wondering whether football is being poorly governed.

He notes that the Premier League is one of the most watched football leagues in the world and the FA invests in grassroots. 

However he argues that a "sense of inertia" has pervaded football governance, specifically on the problems of finance and diversity.

He acknowledges that the "pale, male, stale" Culture Committee, which has are more men called Nigel than there are women, might not be in the best position to lecture on diversity. 

However he argues that the committee works with a female PPS who supports a female sports minister who supports a female culture secretary, who supoprts a female Prime Minister. 

Minister: in UK's interest for EU to 'flourish'

Financial services and Brexit debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Summing up the debate for Labour, Lord Tunnicliffe says the party's main concern is "passporting", the ability of UK financial services firms to sell their products into the EU. He says it's "integral" to the way banks operate.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe is the minister responsible for Brexit and financial services within the Treasury. She says the UK has "numerous and longstanding" financial links to the EU, and that it is in the UK's interest for the EU to "flourish".

She says she's a "glass half full person" and has been glad to hear notes of optimism from some members. She reiterates the PM's lines on Brexit so far, that the UK will not seek membership of the single market but a "strategic partnership with the EU" that "compliments the needs of our industries", including financial services.

On avoiding a "cliff edge", she says that the government will seek a "phased" introduction of changes to arrangements for financial services. 

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
BBC

Vaz: Lack of diversity should be tackled

FA governance debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Keith Vaz
BBC

Labour MP Keith Vaz says his constituency, Leicester, is a place of diversity and also the home to the Premier League champions.

"Not for long" shouts a nearby MP.

Speaking over the heckles, he argues that diversity in football management needs to be tackled.

He notes that although a quarter of professional footballers are black, only 17 out of the 92 top football clubs have an ethnic minority person in a senior coaching role.  

'Turkeys won't vote for Christmas'

FA governance debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Damian Collins
BBC

Culture Committee chair Damian Collins sets out a number of concerns with the FA.

He welcomes the success of the Premier League, but says he fears that it exerts too strong an influence over the organisation.

He also expresses concern about the lack of diversity, noting that there are more men over 80 on the FA council than there are women.

He argues that the organisation could do more when it comes to investing in local clubs and grassroots facilities.

Turkeys won't vote for Christmas without external pressure, he says - and argues that the government should introduce legislation to implement a reogranisation.

FA governance debate begins

House of Commons

Parliament

Wembley Stadium
ALLSPORT/Getty Images

MPs now begin debating a no confidence motion tabled by members of the Culture, Media and Sport Committee.

The motion states that the House has "no confidence in the ability of the Football Association (FA)".

It calls on the government to bring forward legislative proposals to reform the governance of the association. 

FA chairman Greg Clarke says he will quit the organisation if it cannot win government support for its reform plans.

Five former FA executives have said the governing body had failed to "self-reform".

Sports Minister Tracey Crouch has said the FA will lose its £30m-40m of public funding if it does not reform.

'A fast-track to paradise'

Israeli settlement debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Tobias Ellwood
BBC

Responding to the debate, Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood worries that the concept of a Palestinian state is being "eroded" by settlement. "That is a huge concern", he says.

He also urges the Palestinian Authority to do more.

He fears that the younger Palestinian generation has given up on its own representatives and instead is pursuing "a fast-track to paradise" by "grabbing a knife and killing an Israeli soldier".

He concludes by telling MP that the "only way to lasting peace" is a two-state solution, and that the obstacles to peace are the settlements but also continued violence and incitement to terrorism by Palestinians. 

Brexit 'more complicated than it appears'

Financial services and Brexit debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour peer Lord Desai says "the more I study the problem of Brexit, the more complicated it appears".

Former Cabinet Secretary Lord Butler of Brockwell talks about the need to avoid a "cliff edge" of financial services arrangements changing abruptly. 

He says he supports a transitional period, but he believes a "rapid agreement in the interest of both sides" would be better.

Lord Dykes says the committee's report is "realistic" and expresses a "proper degree of pessimism about the difficulties we're going to face in the future".

'Dark and depressing years'

Israeli settlement debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Emily Thornberry
BBC

The last few years have been "very dark and depressing", says shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry.

She says that a two-state solution is "moving away from us" and adds that settlements are "a road block to peace".

However she argues that the conflict cannot be reduced to that issue alone, and calls for an end to violence "on both sides".

She expresses "deep disappointment" that the government has failed to recognise Palestinian statehood. 

She asks how the government can persuade British companies not to invest in settlement areas. 

SNP: Trade with settlements 'should be discouraged'

Israeli settlement debate

House of Commons

Parliament

The destruction of Palestinian villages must stop, says SNP spokesman Patrick Grady.

He asks what representations the government has made to Israel concerning the recent legislation seeking to retroactively legalise settlements.

He says the SNP believe that trade and investment with Jewish settlements "should be discouraged". 

'Jewish people not to blame' - DUP MP

Israeli settlement debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Jim Shannon
BBC

The DUP's Jim Shannon says that "Jewish people are not the ones to blame".

They want to live in peace in their own land, he says, and argues that the motion does not recognise this. 

He says that peace will only happen through encouragement and not divisions.

He adds that he will not support the motion. 

Brexit signs

Stephen Walker

BBC News NI Political Correspondent

A move to ensure the government takes on board the Good Friday Agreement during Brexit negotiations is rejected by MPs.

Read more

SNP MP recalls working as a doctor in Gaza

Israeli settlement debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Philippa Whitford
BBC

SNP MP Philippa Whitford tells MPs that she worked as a surgeon in Gaza.

She praises Israeli doctors who "treated people from all communities".

However, she adds that on some occasions patients died because they could not get to hospitals due to the curfew.

Peers debate Brexit and financial services

House of Lords

Parliament

The Canary Wharf business district is seen reflected in windows at dusk in London
Reuters
The Canary Wharf business district is seen reflected in windows at dusk in London

Lib Dem Baroness Falkner of Margavine is introducing a debate on the EU Financial Affairs sub-committee's report on Brexit and financial services.

She says the committee's report is clear that a "cliff edge" scenario of rapid change to arrangements for selling financial services into the EU would represent a "grave threat", not just to financial institutions but "to financial stability more generally".

The report calls for there to be a "transitional deal" and says that a deal to allow the UK to sell financial services into the EU would be in the interests of both parties.

Does Israel have geopolitical cover? asks Labour MP

Israeli settlement debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Lyn Brown
BBC

Labour's Lyn Brown wonders if Israel's new law legalising existing settlements is linked to the election of the new US president.

Does Israel now have geopolitical cover for settlement expansion? she asks.

Peers considering immigration orders

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have passed the Commonwealth Development Corporation Bill and the House has moved on to consider a pair of orders on immigration.

The first order removes the exemption from the £200 immigration health charge for non-EEA nationals who move to the UK on an intra-company transfer visa. 

An ICT visa is when a company moves an already existing foreign-based employee into a role in the UK.

The second order allows the UK government to charge immigration related fees to people who apply to enter the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.

Labour MP attacks new Israeli law

Israeli settlement debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Naz Shah
BBC

Labour’s Naz Shah objects to a new law, passed by the Israeli parliament, which retroactively legalises 3,900 settler homes built on private Palestinian land in the occupied West Bank. 

She accuses Israel of legislating in land that "is not under their rule".

She notes that a former Israeli minister has described the law as "evil and dangerous" and that the Israeli Attorney General has said it is unconstitutional.

'A David and Goliath situation'

Israeli settlements debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Tommy Sheppard
BBC

SNP MP Tommy Sheppard says it is widely accepted that the best route to peace is a two state solution.

However, he argues that such a solution is impossible while one state is militarily occupying the land of the other.

"It's a David and Goliath situation."

Israel and the Palestinians: Can settlement issue be solved?

3 February 2017

Israeli settlements
AFP

The issue of Jewish settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem has long been a major source of dispute between Israel and the Palestinians, and most of the international community.

Here is a brief guide to what it is all about.

Read more here.

What can we do? asks Conservative MP

Israeli settlements debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Philip Hollobone
BBC

There has been "disgusting incitement" by the Palestinians, says Conservative Philip Hollobone.

However, he adds that language used by Jewish settlers has been "equally vile".

We are never going to find resolution until we deal with both sides of the argument, he argues.

He asks "what can we do other than shouting from the touchlines".

He says he is not in favour of boycotting Israeli products but wants the government to adopt "a robust method of action against Israeli government".

Israel should be congratulated not condemned - Bob Blackman

Israeli settlements

House of Commons

Parliament

Bob Blackman
BBC

Conservative Bob Blackman argues that "the plight of Jewish refugees forced out of Arab states" is never mentioned.

By building new settlements, he says, Israel is trying to house such people.

"We should not condemn but congratulate them."

Palestinians receive 'degrading' treatment

Israeli settlements debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Simon Danczuk
BBC

Independent MP Simon Danczuk says that Palestinians have been treated in a "degrading and inhuman" way by the Israelis.

He describes "perpetual land grabs" as illegal and "a barrier to peace".

He argues that Britain has "a moral responsibility" to the Palestinian people, given its role in the creation of Israel.

In 1917, the then foreign secretary Lord Balfour wrote a letter which stated that the British government was sympathetic to a movement calling for a Jewish homeland in Palestine.  

The Balfour Declaration is seen as instrumental in the establishment of an Israeli state 30 years later.

Motion is 'one-sided and simplistic'

Israeli settlements debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Ian Austin
BBC

Labour's Ian Austin accuses the motion of being one-sided and simplistic.

He says the Palestinian Authority incites violence and incentivises terrorism by paying salaries to convicted terrorists. 

Furthermore, he notes that millions have been spent on promoting terrorism rather than on building schools or hospitals. 

He also adds that 75% of Israeli settlers are on 6.3% of the land. 

'Trust needed' on both sides for peace

Israeli settlements debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Joan Ryan
BBC

Joan Ryan, chair of Labour Friends of Israel, says she's opposed to the continued building of settlements which "threatens the viability of a future Palestinian state, the case for which is unarguable".

But she says that settlements are not "the only, nor the principle" barrier to peace. 

She says the biggest problem is a lack of trust on both sides. 

She says trust is not helped by an "unrelenting stream of anti-semitic incitement" from Palestinian authorities including children's TV programmes that teach hatred of Jews, the naming of streets after suicide bombers or announcements from state media that "all of Israel is occupied territory".

Friends don't let friends make 'damaging mistakes'

Israeli settlements debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Crispin Blunt
BBC

Foreign Affairs Committee chair Crispin Blunt says Palestinian leaders have made decisions that do not give their case the "legal and moral authority it deserves".

But, he says, we can't lose sight of the fact that "settlements are illegal under international law for a reason" and that the world has moved on from thinking you can "conquer someone's territory and colonise it".

He says that true friends of Israel should oppose their settlement policy because many people around the world see "Israel through the clouded prism of settlements".

Referencing the UK's long friendship with Israel, he says that "friends should not allow each other to make profound and damaging mistakes, which is why I support this motion".

Outlining views

Labour MP tweets

MP fears for 'two state solution'

Israeli settlements debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative Sir Desmond Swayne is leading debate on the motion. 

He says that after voting in favour of a bill retrospectively legalising settlements on the West Bank totalling 4,000 homes, an Israeli minister said it was the "first step to full Israeli sovereignty over Judea and Samaria". 

Sir Desmond adds that the minister "chose his words carefully".

'Judea and Samaria' is an Israeli term for the land generally known as the West Bank.

He goes on to endorse former US Secretary of State John Kerry's remarks made in December that hopes of a two-state solution were "in serious jeopardy" because of the Israeli government's approach to settlements.

Unconvinced?

Labour peer tweets

MPs debate Israeli settlements

House of Commons

Parliament

Israeli security forces as they prepare to evict hardline Jewish occupants of the wildcat settlement
Getty Images/AFP

The motion being debated by MPs this afternoon calls for an immediate halt to the building of new Israeli settlements.

The motion says such settlements undermine the prospects for "the contiguity and viability of the state of Palestine".

On 24 January, Israel's prime minister announced that 2,500 more homes would be built in existing settlements.

Under the legislation, the Palestinian landowners will be given financial compensation or alternative land.

Last year the UN supported calls for Israel to end settlement activity on occupied land.

Bishop publishes statement on Dubs amendment announcement

Bishop tweets