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Summary

  1. MPs debate ratifying Istanbul Convention against domestic violence
  2. Peers debate Homelessness Reduction Bill

Live Reporting

By Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

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Commons Adjourns

House of Commons

Parliament

commons clock
BBC

And so the week in Parliametn comes to an end and the House of Commons has adjourned. 

MPs return at 2:30pm on Monday for Communities and Local Government questions. 

The main business of the day are debates on the level of government spending on flood prevention and health and social care.

You can find out more about the week ahead here in our parliamentary correspondent Mark D'Arcy's blog . Hope you can join us then. 

Sexual health teaching 'key part' of PHSE

Adjournment Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Education Minister Caroline Dineage pays tribute to Mike Freer's work as chair of the parliamentary group on HIV and AIDS.

She says HIV is extensively taught, including in biology lessons. In PHSE, sexual health teaching is "a key part" and "doesn't encourage early sexual experimentation", it "enables young people to be mature" and undersatnd the reasons for "delaying sexual activity".

Adjournment debate begins

House of Commons

Parliament

Mike Freer
BBC

Time on the Awards for Valour Bill runs out at 2.30pm during a speech by the Conservative MP Christopher Chope. 

The Commons now moves to the last business of the week, an adjournment debate by Conservative MP Mike Freer. He's raising the issue of awareness of HIV in PSHE lessons in schools.

He says "there are now more people living with HIV than ever before" in the UK, more than 100,000. 

He says HIV is now a predominantly heterosexual virus, now mostly transmitted by unprotected sex, which is why it's important to teach teenagers about it in schools. He adds that part of the problem is that young people "feel invincible".

Davies 'trying to talk the bill out'

Awards for Valour Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Gareth Johnson
BBC

Conservative MP Gareth Johnson, the main sponsor of this bill, intervenes in Philip Davies' speech. 

He says it's "quite clear to me what he's trying to achieve, he's trying to talk the bill out" with "wrecking amendments...not based on logic". 

He adds that the bill has support from the opposition and the SNP and asks why he's trying to prevent it becoming law.

Philip Davies says his amendments are "all in order" and have been selected for debate by the Speaker. He says that process of dealing with amendments "takes as long as it takes".

Later, Gareth Johnson intervenes again to ask if Mr Davies thinks it's sad that on Remembrance Sunday this year "any individual can parade in front of widows, families and loved ones, wearing medals they have not received" because he has "filibustered this bill"?

Philip Davies replies that he's "trying to improve this bill" which was originally a "dog's breakfast". 

He goes on to accuse Mr Johnson of talking "a load of old nonsense"

'All sorts of rubbish' spoken in pubs

Awards for Valour Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Philip Davies
BBC

Conservative MP Philip Davies is arguing that the bill, while well intentioned, is misconceived. It's intended to stop people claiming to have fought in wars and received bravery awards when they haven't.

Philip Davies has a number of amendments down to modify the bill, including one that insists it's only illegal to wear a medal you haven't earned in a public place, and another that excludes public houses from the scope of the bill because "pubs are places where all sorts of rubbish is spoken".

Through the lobby

Labour MP tweets

MPs pass Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

The bill passes third reading by 138 votes to one, provoking cheering and applause from the SNP benches.. It will now move on to the House of Lords for further consideration.

MPs are now moving on to Conservative MP Gareth Johnson's Awards for Valour (Protection) Bill. The bill is intended to prevent people wearing medals "with the intent to deceive".

Philip Davies, who frequently opposes private members' bills (including the previous one debated today), has a series of amendments tabled to this bill. He says he disagrees with the bill and finds it "deficient".

MPs vote 'aye' to having a vote...

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Chris Pincher
BBC
Government whip Chris Pincher announces the result

The closure motion passes by 135 votes to three. Since more than 100 MPs took part, that means that debate on third reading has finished, and MPs are now voting on the legislation itself.

Division!

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are now voting on a closure motion - effectively they are voting on whether to have a vote on the legislation.

If passed, there will be another vote on whether to give a third reading of the bill.

MP points out changes to bill during progress through Commons

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative David Nuttall is now addressing the bill at third reading. He has opposed the bill so far, and outlines some of the reasons why.

And he says that the bill has been changed radically since its inception, particularly the insertion of the government clause which removes the "duty" on the government to ratify the Istanbul Convention (see posts below).

He says there are also changes to the date in which the act comes into force, with no provisions in the bill to tie the government down. "On what date in the future would it be possible for anyone to turn around and look at this act, and say 'ah, the government has not complied with the act'," he asks.

He says it is effectively so widely drafted, that it poses the question "when it would not be possible for the government to say 'we're not quite there yet'?" he asks.  

'Milestone on the journey to equality'

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Eilidh Whiteford
BBC

The SNP's Dr Eilidh Whiteford thanks those who have helped get the bill to this point - including film star Emma Watson, who supported the bill.

Dr Whiteford says the convention and this legislation do have the possibility of making an impact.

"We need to recognise that ratification of the Istanbul Convention is a milestone on the journey to equality and justice for women, not an endpoint," she says.

Bill moves on to third reading

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Government amendment 16 is passed by 132 votes to two.

Now Speaker John Bercow moves onto government amendment 17 - that passes without division.

And that's consideration of report stage done and dusted and we move on to third reading.

SNP's Eilidh Whiteford stands to thank those who have helped with the bill's progress.

Division!

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Government amendment 14 is passed by 135 to three.

Now government amendment 15 is moved - and that is passed without division.

Government amendment 16 is called by Speaker John Bercow - this is pushed to a vote.

And so MPs make their way towards the voting lobbies.

Remember, you can follow every step of the bill's progress and the amendments which are being voted on by looking at the bill documents .

MPs endorse government amendment

Preventing Violence Against Women Act

House of Commons

Parliament

Division result
BBC

MPs have voted for government Amendment 1 by 137 votes to three.

The house also endorses some of the other government amendments without a vote but Amendment 14 is opposed.

It would remove the government's obligation to report annually on measures taken to remain compliant with the Istanbul Convention.

Division!

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have now divided to vote on Amendment 1 to the bill, tabled by the government.

The amendment removes Clause 1 of the bill, which imposes a "duty" on the government to ratify the Istanbul Convention. 

The SNP sponsor of the bill, Eilidh Whiteford, has said that she supports the amendment "with reservations" because she accepts the government's "good faith" on the issue.

Government should show 'precisely' what is needed for ratification

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Christopher Chope, who has some amendments down to the bill, says the government isn't being open about the Istanbul Convention. 

In her speech minister Sarah Newton said that more legislation was needed to ensure the UK can ratify it. Mr Chope says "we haven't heard anything from the government" about "precisely" what measures need to be brought in before the Convention can be ratified.

He says the government should "come up with a list of what is required".

Leader of the Opposition drops by...

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

Jeremy Corbyn on the front bench
BBC

'Brief' comments from Labour front bench

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Sarah Champion
BBC

Labour shadow women and equalities minister Sarah Champion says she's going to "be brief, because we've taken years to get to this point".

She says the Convention is a "step change" in the way violence against women and girls is dealt with and that "successful passage of the bill is hugely significant".

Support from other MPs

Conservative MP tweets

Government's 'absolute commitment' to ratifying Istanbul Convention

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Sarah Newton
BBC

Minister Sarah Newton says the priorities of the Istanbul Convention already "align with those of the UK". 

She adds that the UK already goes further than the Convention requires.

She says there is one outstanding issue, relating to "extraterritorial jurisdiction" (ETJ). She says that the UK already claims ETJ over a number of offences including on FGM and forced marriage, but needs primary legislation to extend this further. 

Extra-territorial juristiction is when states reserve the right to prosecute their citizens for crimes committed elsewhere.

Defending government amendment 1, which removes the clause making it a "duty" to ratify the treaty, she says the government supports the intention of the clause and wants to make it "absolutely clear" that it "in no way changes our absolute commitment to ratifying the Convention". 

She says Clause 1 could be interpreted as pre-empting the will of Parliament over the associated legislation that needs to be brought in, including on ETJ, to help make the UK able to ratify the Convention.

Get well soon...

Poorly peer tweets

Government amendments retain 'spirit of the bill'

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Eilidh Whiteford
BBC

The bill's main sponsor, SNP MP Elidih Whiteford, accuses Philip Davies of tabling "wrecking amendments and talking about them at mind-numbing length".

She says she wants to refute a number of claims made by the Conservative MP. She says the Istanbul Convention does apply to men and transgender individuals, because it deals with domestic violence. Several of the amendments tabled by Mr Davies relate to men and transgender people.

She goes on to say that "all sexual violence is serious, all domestic violence is serious" but says the reality is that women are disproportionately victims, and that the perpetrators are disproportionately men. 

She says the government amendments retain the "integrity and spirit of the bill". 

She says she has "some reservations" over amendment 1, which Philip Davies says effectively neuters the bill, but is "prepared to take in good faith" government promises. She says she also wants to "reject absolutely the assertion from the Tory backbenches that the government doesn't take this seriously".

'At least some of us are honest'

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

After speaking for 92 minutes, Philip Davies sits down. 

At one point he told the deputy speaker that he was "racing through" the amendments, but there were a "great many" of them in the group being debated. The group being debated has 47 separate amendments. 

Philip Davies has put his name to 54 amendments to the bill in total.

He also finds time to have a final jab at the SNP. He says they're supporting a government amendment to the bill, which would remove the clause that would make it a "duty" of the government to ratify the Istanbul Convention. 

He says that "at least some of us are honest that we dislike this bill".

Coming up next month

Labour MP tweets

Today in the Commons

PA's parliamentary editor tweets

UK has 'no idea' what it's signing up to

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Philip Davies is accusing the bill's SNP sponsor of not knowing what the effect of the Istanbul Convention has been in the countries that have already ratified it. He says "we should at least know what we're signing up to...at the moment we have no idea".

The bill seeks to compel the UK government to ratify the Council of Europe’s Istanbul Convention on domestic violence.

The convention aims to eliminate violence against women, and sets minimum standards a government must aim for. 

Ratification would oblige the government to guarantee funding for domestic violence shelters, 24 hour helplines, rape crisis centres and education programmes.

The UN calls the Convention the “gold standard”. The UK signed it, in 2012, but has not officially ratified it.

UK 'often doing these things better' than rest of the world

Preventing Violence Against Women Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Philip Davies
BBC

Conservative MP Philip Davies is the first to speak today, he's introducing the first of a series of amendments to the bill that he's tabled.

The amendment would make judgments on the UK's implementation of the Istanbul Convention by GREVIO, the Council of Europe's expert group on violence against women, and the Committee of the Parties non-binding on the UK government.

He says that "we're often doing these things an awful lot better than the rest of the world".

The Lords is sitting too...

House of Lords

Parliament

And there's plenty to get through in the Lords today.

The first item of legislation on the list is the Homelessness Reduction Bill - peers are debating it at second reading (it's made it's way to the Upper House from the Commons).

Down to speak are figures including  Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top , Big Issue founder  Lord Bird  and the bishops of  Rochester  and  Southwark .

Peers will also be looking at the Broadcasting (Radio Multiplex Services) Bill at second reading; the Parking Places (Variation of Charges) Bill at second reading and the Abortion (Disability Equality) Bill (a Lords bill) at report stage.

You can see who's down to speak for each debate by following this link to the Parliament.UK page and opening the Speaker's list tab.

Today in the Commons

House of Commons

Parliament

First today is a bill from the SNP's  Dr Eilidh Whiteford  entitled Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence Bill.

MPs will be examining this bill at report stage and third reading.

The bill requires the UK to ratify the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence - otherwise known as the Istanbul Convention.

The government has signalled its support for the bill .

The Commons will then move onto report stage for the Awards for Valour (Protection) Bill, introduced by Tory MP  Gareth Johnson .

Good morning

Welcome to a day of private members' bills in Westminster.

Fridays see MPs debating bills which have been introduced by individual MPs and peers who are not government ministers.

You can find out more about them here .

Today, there's a long list of bills to worked through in both the Commons and the Lords.