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Summary

  1. Justice Committee on prison reform
  2. Day in Commons starts with Treasury questions
  3. Estimates day debates on government's productivity plan and intergenerational fairness
  4. Lords starts day with oral questions
  5. Neighbourhood Planning Bill main business in Lords

Live Reporting

By Ben Butcher and Claire Gould

All times stated are UK

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And with that...

...we're going to leave the House of Commons. You can continue to watch the last of the adjournment debate using the live stream above.

Join us tomorrow as we cover PMQs, the Bus Services Bill in the Commons - and full coverage of the Lords as they debate the Brexit bill at committee stage.

See you then.

Adjournment debate on rationing surgery

Adjournment Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Hospital
SPL

Labour's Rachael Maskell's adjournment debate is on rationing of surgery in York. 

She is referring to plans by NHS Vale of York to delay routine surgery for smokers or obese people. 

The restrictions by the Vale of York Clinical Commissioning Group mean overweight patients will have to lose 10% of body weight before surgery.

MPs back a series of estimates

Estimates day

House of Commons

Parliament

All four estimates day debates from Monday and Tuesday receive the support of MPs.

Estimates relating to armed forces numbers are also supported.

Government 'prioritising sustainability of pension provision'

Intergenerational Fairness

House of Commons

Parliament

Richard Harrington
HoC

Work and Pensions Minister Richard Harrington says there are "still far too many pensioners living in poverty".

He says the government will not be complacent on the issue, ensuring that the 'triple lock' will stay for the remainder of this government. 

The government is "prioritising the sustainability of pension provision" in the country. 

This includes supporting reviews of auto-enrollment, which he commends the Labour government for. 

He adds that the government is committed to innovation and productivity, which in turn benefits living standards and pay as part of their broader economic policy. 

Abrahams: there should be no 'trade off' between generations

Intergenerational Fairness

House of Commons

Parliament

Debbie Abrahams
HoC

Shadow work and pensions secretary Debbie Abrahams says we mustn't "trade-off the inequality of one generation against the poverty of another."

Labour is committed to maintaining the triple-lock post-2020 to ensure future generations benefit from state pensions. 

For younger generations, she calls for a "real living wage" which will help real wages grow in a time they appear to be stagnating against inflation and the growing cost of living. 

She argues that the idea that work is the way out of poverty is not necessarily true when jobs do not pay enough to do so. 

She also calls for an increase auto-enrollment into savings. She says it is a "testament to the former Labour government" that 10 million extra people are saving under the system, but says there are still issues.

Passport control at Heathrow airport

Home Secretary writes to peers on eve of key vote to assure them they will have a say on future migration changes.

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SNP: Need for more 'inclusive growth' so 'everybody benefits'

Intergenerational Fairness

House of Commons

Parliament

SNP's Kirsty Blackman says there needs to be more "inclusive growth".

This means, she says, "you sit and work out how to grow the economy so everybody benefits".

To do so, you need to ensure that there is more even demographic growth, whether through immigration or more childbirth. 

She adds: "You should not take away things away from people who are currently pensioner," but rather ensure there is even distribution of wealth. 

Racing ahead?

PA's chief political photographer tweets

McCabe: triple lock system 'is unsustainable'

Intergenerational Fairness

House of Commons

Parliament

Steve McCabe
BBC

Labour's Steve McCabe says he doesn't want a "false bidding war" on what can be offered to pensioners, saying the "triple lock is unsustainable".

It demands an ever-greater share of GDP and creates a trade-off, meaning the retirement age will have to increase. 

He asks what can be done to encourage young people to invest early in their pensions pot. 

He also says that those paying mortgages can be paying half those who are renting, saying that the housing market is another way younger generations can see the system stacked against them.

Looking ahead to the Lords tomorrow

BBC political editor tweets

Help for younger people proposed

Conservative MP tweets

Penrose: UK needs to move away from pay-as-you-go system

Intergenerational Fairness

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP John Penrose says society needs to be "honest with ourselves about the size of the burden we are placing on future generations"

He says we must change the pay-as-you-go system to a fully funded system. 

He say this must be done slowly, but is the only way to ensure intergenerational fairness for future generations. 

Pensions triple-lock 'must be retained'

Intergenerational Fairness

House of Commons

Parliament

Marion Fellows
HoC

SNP's Marion Fellows says that the system is not "skewed in the favour" of baby-boomers, saying they have paid their share to be entitled to pensions. 

She says pensions should not be seen as a benefit, as everyone contributes to it. It should be seen as an earning. 

She says the triple-lock "must be retained" post-2020 to ensure fairness for younger generations. Any state pension linked to earnings only will be detrimental.

Older generation have it better in many ways

Intergenerational Fairness

House of Commons

Parliament

Continuing on, the Work and Pensions committee chair Frank Field launches the committee's report on intergenerational fairness. 

Citing issues with pensions and retirement ages, he acknowledges current generation of people in or approaching retirement will have enjoyed  much more housing and financial wealth, public service usage, and welfare and pension entitlements than more recent generations can hope to receive.

Field: BHS payment will 'bring justice to BHS workers'

Intergenerational Fairness

House of Commons

Parliament

Frank Field
HoC

Chair of the Work and Pensions Committee Frank Field begins the new debate on intergenerational fairness by saying the announcement that former BHS owner Sir Philip Green will pay £365m to the company's pension fund will help "bring justice to BHS workers but also to pensioners."

He says it shows that when committees work together - in this case the Work and Pensions Committee and Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee - work can be done more effectively. 

He says the HMRC and Serious Fraud Office had shown they had taken the situation seriously in a far more productive way than simply of the "sacramental" move of removing his knighthood, as some of the press had called for. 

There was an estimated £571m hole in the BHS pension covering all future payouts, which a pension regulator said Sir Philip Green was liable for. 

Johnson: UK 'will build on strengths' for productivity

Productivity Plan

House of Commons

Parliament

Jo Johnson
HoC

Science and Universities Minister Jo Johnson says Britain will be "flexible" and "ready" in regards to developing productivity. 

He says that the government is investing £22bn in productivity into projects, including transport and digital infrastructure. 

The UK will "build on our strengths and extend on our future," he says, in reference to the extra £4.2bn infrastructure spending promised in the Autumn Statement. 

He says the UK knows its weaknesses, but also knows the right way to build on them.

Onwurah: government must do more to 'empower' workers

Productivity Plan

House of Commons

Parliament

Chi Onwurah
HoC

Shadow business, energy and industry minister Chi Onwurah says "high productivity is collated with high wages and high skills", but the government has failed on this. 

Productivity has increased by just 0.4% a year since 2010. 

She suggests the UK does not do enough to "empower" workers, which in turn means workers are less productive. 

She urges the government to "invest in people" and technology, using the opportunities to train people in new skills. 

She also insists that certain sectors and their employees should not be "left in the cold" in regards to research and development funding, including retail. 

Labour, she says, is committed to spending £250bn in capital in 10 years and, as part of this, creating a national development bank for productivity projects. 

Labour MP challenges Chancellor over northern funding post-Brexit

Watch again from Treasury questions

Labour MP Alison McGovern challenges Chancellor Philip Hammond over northern funding post-Brexit. He says the government's industrial strategy paper shows commitment to infrastructure investment.

Security Commissioner's priority is resilience against terrorism

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Sir Julian King
HoC

Chair Yvette Cooper closes the session with a final question, asking Sir Julian what he most worried about.

Sir Julian says the "twin threats" from terrorism and cyber security are what concerns him most.

"The terrorist threat is very high and doesn't show any sign of reducing," he says, and it affects of all of the EU.

He says the EU is building resiliance against attacks, and to deal with the aftermath "if the worst happens".

He says reinforcing Frontex to assist Italy and Greece in assessing who is entering the EU is key to this resiliance work, and that the EU is working on an entry and exit check system to track citizens of all third countries.

Ms Cooper thanks Sir Julian for his evidence and closes the session.

EU 'welcomes' UK commitment to Europol - Julian King

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Sir Julian King
HoC

Committee Chair Yvette Cooper asks if transitional arrangements on security would be helpful.

Sir Julian says the EU welcomes the UK's decision to opt back in to Europol co-operation, and this will make it easier to implement a transitional arrangement, to avoid "gaps opening up".

In response to a question from James Berry, Sir Julian says he has "no quarrel" with the UK government's previously stated commitment to Europol and information sharing as broad aims for the Brexit negotiations.

Jenrick: simplify taxes and lower energy costs

Productivity Plan

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative Robert Jenrick supports long-term infrastructure projects that "do not cost the earth", including fixing congestion on the roads. 

He also says reducing energy costs will encourage businesses to set-up in the UK, particularly when they have high-energy costs. 

"Tax simplification" will also make the UK a more business friendly environment, he says.

Terrorism 'greatest threat' to EU

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Conservative David Burrowes asks Sir Julian if he agrees with the European Parliament's main Brexit negotiatior Guy Verhofstadt's view that the "main existential threats" to the EU are Russia, President Trump and Islamic extremism.

Sir Julian says all the recent examples show that the greatest threat comes from terrorism.

He says he was able to meet US General Mattis on his recent visit to Europe and was reassured about the US's commitment to Nato.

UK will need to reassure EU on data security laws

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Stuart C McDonald
HoC

SNP member Stuart McDonald asks what the position for the UK will be if it leaves the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice.

Sir Julian says access to data would depend on whether the UK's data protection and security measures were acceptable to the EU's security agencies.

The EU would need to be assured of a third country's data security, or "data adequacy", before authorising the sharing of data outside the EU, he says.

Sir Julian says the EU's arrangement with the United States was challenged by the European Court, resulting in changes to US law on data protection and undertakings on mass collection of data on EU citizens.

Don't 'ignore or exaggerate' difficulties of Brexit negotiations

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Labour's Chuka Umunna puts the recent comments by former Prime Minister Sir John Major about "overly optimistic" expectations being raised on the outcome from the Brexit negotiations.

"We shouldn't ignore or exaggerate" the difficulties likely in the negotiations, says Sir Julian.

Sir Julian doesn't agree that the mood is "sour" going into the negotiations, as the emotions following the referendum vote have calmed.

Chuka Umunna
HoC

Quin: comparisons with Germany not fair

Productivity Plan

House of Commons

Parliament

Jeremy Quin
BBC

Germany is a very different economy to the UK, says Conservative Jeremy Quin, in response to comparisons in productivity. 

Whilst they are able to produce in-demand goods for developing countries, it should be accepted that they look at the British service industry for inspiration, he says. 

However, improvements to roads, support for students going down "vocational routes", and R&D investment are all vital to improving productivity, he adds.

He says that businesses - including Google, Facebook and Nissan - all notice the government's work in creating a more business friendly environment, adding: "now is the right time to invest in Britain." 

More 'friction' over extradition post-Brexit likely

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Yvette Cooper
HoC

Committee chair Yvette Cooper asks Sir Julian on his views of the arrangements with Norway and Iceland on security and extradition.

Sir Julian is reluctant to put a time-frame on how long it could take the UK to negotiate its own justice and security arrangement with the EU. He concedes there is likely to be "more friction" over extradition cases without the European Arrest Warrant in place.

Ms Cooper presses Sir Julian on whether he thinks other arrangements "would be worse" for security than the existing European Arrest Warrant.

He admits that extradition "wouldn't be as quick or simple" as under the EAW.

Read more about the European Arrest Warrant here

EU countries 'share' desire to work with UK on security

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

"Just because something is a shared objective, doesn't mean it will be easy to achieve", says Sir Julian when pressed by Mr Winnick on the shared interest in tackling terrorism across Europe.

Mr Winnick moves on to ask Sir Julian's impression of how his Commission colleagues view the UK's decision to leave the EU.

Sir Julian says there was "great emotion" in the immediate aftermath of the referendum vote, but that has calmed.  

"On security, there is a strong, shared desire" to come to a good arrangement, he says.

MP urges rethink on post-study visas

Productivity Plan

House of Commons

Parliament

Independent Michelle Thomson uses part of her speech to criticise the speed with which international students are "booted out."

She cites one student who researched coastal engineering, but was forced out before he was able to practically help implement ideas in the UK. 

This is counter-intuitive and more practical plans are need for post-study visas, she adds. 

'No precedents' for non-EU countries to access security frameworks

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

David Winnick
HoC

Labour's David Winnick asks if the UK will be less secure outside the EU.

Sir Julian repeats that the security threat will not change, and the UK will continue to be a target for terrorism or cyber crime.

Mr Winnick asks if the UK will be less able to defend itself, outside the EU.

Sir Julian says the UK's membership or access to the various security frameworks will be the subject of negotiation.

He goes on to say there are "no precedents" for third countries to access border information from Schengen countries for example, or for an arrangement similar to the European Arrest Warrant.

Links between education, apprenticeships and business needed

Productivity Plan

House of Commons

Parliament

Amanda Solloway
BBC

Conservative MP Amanda Solloway says primary and secondary education is vital to improving productivity in manufacturing. 

She says basic skills in numeracy, which are at the heart of government policy, are important to making sure Britain remains competitive. 

In regards to the ' Midlands Engine ', she welcomes initiatives which combine apprenticeships, schools and businesses. 

In her constituency of Derby, she believes that on-going projects will help deliver this, helping young people learn skills in engineering and brick-laying. 

UK 'cannot be full member' of Europol after Brexit - Julian King

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Conservative Ranil Jayawardena asks if there is the political will to make an arrangement with the UK on Europol.

"Once the UK is not a member of the EU, it cannot be a full member of Europol, so there will have to be some new arrangement", says Sir Julian, but that as the security threat will not change, all sides will want to continue co-operation on counter-terrorism.

Mr Jaywardena asks what Sir Julian sees as the priorities during his time in office.

Sir Julian lists people trafficking, cyber crime and serious organised crime as major areas to tackle. 

Mullin: we need 'more immigration of the right kind'

Productivity Plan

House of Commons

Parliament

The SNP's Roger Mullin says "what we need is more immigration of the right kind."

He says tier-one visas should be given to investors who are investing less than £2m. 

He also says that entrepreneurship visas should be easier to attain. Entrepreneurs need £50,000 and a solid business plan, he says, which is too much. 

These "supply-side blockages" are limiting people from benefiting British productivity, he adds. 

Danish lessons for the UK post-Brexit?

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Conservative James Berry asks about the situation with Denmark, which has opted out of the Schengen border arrangement and has subsequently been prevented from remaining a part of Europol.

Sir Julian gives a detailed explanation of Denmark's position, saying it is "very particular" to Denmark, as a remaining member of the EU.

The position for "third countries" having access to Europol would be different to the Danish arrangement, he says.

The UK is party to a number of EU-wide justice and home affairs measures, including the European Arrest Warrant, and Europol.  

The Home Secretary has said she would like the UK to retain an "ongoing role" in Europol after Brexit. 

UK must embrace 'fourth industrial revolution'

Productivity Plan

House of Commons

Parliament

Chris White
BBC

Conservative Chris White says that Mr Wight is in the habit of being "glass half empty", but acknowledges the report's recommendations. 

The productivity plan puts the UK in a "good position" to promote more high-skilled roles. 

As chair of the all-party manufacturing group, he emphasises the need to take part in the "fourth industrial revolution" in a similar way to Japan and Germany. 

This involves investing more in automation and technology as well as "horizontal innovation" across industries. 

Investing in high-tech industry and infrastructure needs to be done nationally within a fixed timescale and must include everyone, he says.

EU policing and security

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Sir Julian King
HoC

Committee Chair Yvette Cooper opens the evidence session with Sir Julian King.

Sir Julian is a former Ambassador to France and Ireland and was appointed as EU Commissioner for Security in September 2016.

Sir Julian says this is a new role, created by Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, to support the member EU states in tackling terrorism, cyber crime and serious organised crime.

He goes on to say that he will play no part in the forthcoming Brexit negotiations, to avoid any possible conflict of interest.

Research levels put productivity at risk

Productivity Plan

House of Commons

Parliament

Research
PA

Iain Wright also says there is concern in the level of investment in research and development (R&D) and its impact on productivity. 

Although the annual 4.2% increase in research funding since 1991 is "impressive", it is still low in comparison to other countries. The 2% of GDP investment in R&D OECD target has only been reached once - in 1986.

He says it is unevenly distributed with seven sectors accounting for two-thirds of total R&D spending.

Who is investing in R&D is also an issue. In 1991, 73% of R&D was done by British-owned firms, but now over half is by international firms, Mr Wright says. 

EU policing and security

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

In a moment, the Home Affairs Committee will begin a session on EU policing and security issues with Sir Julian King, the Commissioner for Security Union at the European Commission.

Varying rates of productivity across the UK

Productivity Plan

House of Commons

Parliament

Mr Wright says median pay for British workers is "still around 5% lower" than pre-2008.

He says pay and productivity rates in other European countries outstrips that of the UK.

Mr Wright goes on to note the huge regional and national differences across the UK in rates of productivity, compared with London and the south-east, which is the best performing area.

He says he doesn't want to "drag London and the south-east back", but to bring the rest of the UK more in line with London's output.