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Summary

  1. Science Committee investigates ocean environment
  2. Commons day begins with Scotland questions
  3. PMQs at noon
  4. MPs look at Bus Services Bill
  5. Lords starts with oral questions at 3pm
  6. Peers debating Brexit bill this afternoon and evening

Live Reporting

By Claire Gould, Kate Whannel and Ben Butcher

All times stated are UK

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Alex Hunt

BBC News

A guide to how the UK will leave the European Union following the 23 June referendum vote.

Read more

Peers debate final amendment

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

House of Lords
HoL

Labour's Lea of Crondall speaks to his amendment which requires the prime minister to publish a report on the government's approach to the UK's co-operation with the European technical agencies.

That is where we have to leave our coverage of the House of Lords.

Peers return tomorrow at 11am for oral questions. 

Peers warned not to 'tie government's hands'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Keen of Elie
HoL

Government spokesman Lord Keen of Elie gets to his feet to cheers from his colleagues.

This is because he is now responding to one of the last group of amendments in the committee stage. 

Lord Keen tells peers that there has been "regular and ongoing engagement" with the devolved nations adding that the prime minister's first visit on being elected was to Edinburgh. 

He adds that it is important "not to tie the government's hands" and urges peers to withdraw their amendments.

Imploding executives and dastardly Londoners

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Ulster Unionist peer Lord Empey questions the feasibility of consulting the Northern Ireland government given that the "executive has imploded".

Lib Dem Baroness Ludford says that you don't have to be from a devolved region to support these amendments.

"You can even be a dastardly Londoner," she adds.

Peer fears 'a Wallonia- type situation'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Earl of Kinoull
HoL

Crossbencher Earl of Kinnoull fears that the amendments in this group could lead to a "Wallonia-type situation" in the UK.

Last year the Belgian region of Wallonia was able to, temporarily, block a trade deal between the EU and Canada. 

What happens next?

Research department tweets

'The cobwebs of colonialism still exist'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbench peer Lord Elystan-Morgan supports amendment 43 on the grounds that when England and Wales deal with each other it is "not on the basis of partnership and equality".

"The cobwebs of colonialism still exist," he warns.

Lib Dem Baroness Randerson argues that the amendments establishing "formal structures" for negotiations are needed because "mere assurances will be totally inadequate".

Wigley: London needs to work with devolved nations

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Wigley
HoL

What matters, argues Plaid Cymru peer Lord Wigley, is that Edinburgh, Belfast and Cardiff feel that the government is working with them "as partners".

He acknowledges that "power rests in London".

However, he warns the government that it will "be creating problems for itself" if it does not give the opinions of the devolved administrations "serious thought".

Peers debate the role of the devolved nations

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Scottish and Welsh flags
BBC

Lord Pannick withdraws his amendment "for now" leaving open the possibility that this will return at report stage next week.

Peers move on to the next (and last) group of amendments for the evening.

These amendments deal with the role of the devolved nations during the negotiations.

'The most meaningful vote imaginable'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

House of Lords
HoL

Brexit Minister Lord Bridges warns the House that his response will be "brutally" simple.

The majority of people voted to leave the EU, he says.

He tells peers that the government's offer of a parliamentary vote on the final deal was described by the shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer as "huge and very important".

Lord Bridges says the vote will be "the most meaningful vote imaginable".

However, he clarifies that the vote will be on how the UK leaves the EU "not whether we leave the EU".

"That decision has already been made at the ballot box."

Brexit bill: what's being debated tonight?

Peers are debating committee stage of the EU (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill - and it's second day of that stage. Report stage is the next stage, and that'll come next week.

Remember, you can read the documents to the bill - that includes all the amendments being debated tonight - here .

PM's assurance 'is not good enough'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

The government will negotiate the exit deal but Parliament must approve it, says Labour spokeswoman Baroness Hayter.

She notes that it is written in law that European Parliament must give consent to any deal, but not the UK Parliament.

The prime minister's assurance "is not good enough", she argues.

Lisvane: Legislation is better than a motion

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Lisvane
HoL

Crossbencher peer and former clerk in the House of Commons Lord Lisvane asks what happens if one House approves a motion and the other rejects it.

He suggests that a solution would be to inroduce legislation which has "well understood mechanisms" for securing agreement between the two Houses. 

People want 'a rebalancing of power'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Stowell
HoL

Conservative peer and former Leader of the House of Lords Baroness Stowell of Beeston warns that approving the amendment will "fuel distrust" in the House of Lords.

People in the referendum voted for more sovereignty, she says but adds that they also wanted "a reblanacing of power".

They did not necessarily want all control and power to sit in parliament, she says. 

"I think we should reflect on that."

Peers should 'stand up for sovreignty'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative peer Lord Deben supports the amendments urging peers to "stand up for sovereignty".

He points out that for today's debate to take place a case had to go to the Supreme Court. 

Therefore, he argues, this House ought to ensure that there is "a copper-bottomed statutory protection" for what the prime minister has promised.

Amendments 'create an absurdity'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Howell of Guildford
HoL

Conservative peer Lord Howell of Guildford says that MPs already have the power to bring matters to Parliament through devices and procedures. 

These "elaborate" amendments, he argues, do not fit in with the way Parliament works adding that the amendments "create an absurdity". 

It's all very well voting on motions, intervenes Lord Hope of Craighead, but "legislation is key".

Lord Howell points out that MPs were able to stop the government conducting military action against Syria through a motion rather than legislation.

What happens if there is no deal? asks Labour peer

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

What happens if there is no deal? asks Labour's Baroness Kennedy.

She says that if the UK leaves the EU without an agreement and has to revert to World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules, rights will be lost.

If no deal is reached, Parliament should have the option to vote on whether to revert to WTO rules or remain in the EU, she argues. 

She suggests that there will be no vote on these amendments tonight but urges peers to bring back these amendments at report stage which will take place next week.

Howard: Amendment is wrong in principle

Breixt Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Howard
HoL

The amendment is wrong in principle, constitutionally improper and unnecessary, argues Conservative Lord Howard.

He admits that he may be either "rather courageous" of "foolhardy" going up against Lord Pannick, the lawyer who won the Supreme Court case against the government on Article 50.

His reasoning, he tells peers, is that it is not the job of Parliament to negotiate with foreign powers.

In terms of sovereignty, he argues that Parliament has the power to pass a vote of no confidence in the government and is therefore "always supreme".

'An ulterior purpose'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Spicer
HoL

Conservative Lord Spicer promises to be "quite short" because he has "forgotten most of what he was going to say".

He suggest that those behind the amendments have "an ulterior purpose" to slow down the process of leaving the EU.

He urges peer not to "take much notice" of the amendments.

What is the definition of legal residence?

Lord Campbell: Legally resident 'means legally resident'
In response to a question from Tory Brexiteer Lord Forsyth about the lack of any definition of legal residence, Lib Dem peer Lord Campbell quotes the phrase "Brexit means Brexit" to make his point that EU residents need statutory guarantees, not verbal assurances.

Pannick: Political promise no substitute for legislative obligation

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Pannick
BBC

The amendments are withdrawn and peers now move on to the next set of amendments.

These seek to ensure that there is parliamentary approval for the outcome of the negotiations with the EU.

Crossbencher Lord Pannick notes that the government has made a commitment to giving parliament a vote on an exit deal.

However, Lord Pannick argues that a political promise is "no substitute" for an obligation in legislation. 

'A veritable cornucopia of issues'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Bridges of Headley
HoL

The minister rises to respond to the debate but it takes a few minutes before he can start as Labour's Lord Judd wants to speak.

Lord Judd is persuaded to sit down by party colleagues and Brexit Minister Lord Bridges of Headley begins his response to a "veritable cornucopia of issues". 

He predicts that his response will incur the frustration of peers.

While he agrees there should be a debate on the areas raised, "the amendments have no place in this bill".

Taylor: Don't go back to bargain basement rights

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Baroness Taylor of Bolton speaks in support of amendment 33, which would require the prime minister to "have regard to" ensuring EU co-operation on ending violence against women, tackling female genital mutilation and ending human trafficking. 

She urges the government "not to go back to bargain basement rights".

'This is not something you jeer about'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Balfe
HoL

Conservative Lord Balfe raises a number of issues including the future of the European Medicines Agency and the Banking Agency.

When he tells peers that he is coming to the end of his speech, a few nearby peers let out murmurs of approval.

This is about the future of human beings, responds Lord Balfe.

"This is not something you jeer about."

Lord Strathclyde criticises Brexit vote
Lord Strathclyde says the vote in the House of Lords against the government over Brexit has turned British citizens living in the EU into "bargaining chips".
Labour's Baroness Smith: EU citizens not bargaining chips
Labour's Baroness Smith: EU citizens not bargaining chips

Monty Python and Roadrunner cited in debate

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Smith
HoL

"This debate reminds me of a scene in a film," says Leader of the Opposition Baroness Smith of Basildon.

She refers to the comedy Life of Brian and the "what have the Romans ever done for us?" scene.

What has Europe ever done for us, she paraphrases.

"Education, employment rights, the economy, consumer protection, science, environment, women's rights, business, trade, tackling organised crime and of course peace," she offers.

Labour has tabled an amendment setting out the areas the prime minister should "have regard to" during negotiations.

These areas include maintaining a stable economy, preserving peace in Northern Ireland and establishing non-tariff barriers.

Baroness Smith urges the government not to replicate Roadrunner by "hurtling towards the cliff edge only, when its too late, to look down and find there is nothing there."

UK 'must redouble efforts' to work with European countries

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem Baroness Northover now speaks to her amendment which requires the government to seek continued participation in the EU Common Foreign and Security Policy during the negotiations.

She argues that on leaving the EU, the UK must "redouble our efforts" to work with European partners. 

Peers debate transitional arrangement amendments

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Jones of Moulescoomb
HoL

Lib Dem peer Lord Teverson expresses disappointment at the government response, but withdraws his amendment. 

The next group of amendments address transitional arrangements and the government's negotiation priorities once Article 50 has been triggered.

Green Party peer Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb speaks to her amendment which requires the government to set out its approach to transitional arrangements.

Under this amendment, Article 50 could only be triggered once Parliament has given its approval to the government's approach.  

How many more 'unexploded bombs', asks Labour peer

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Young of Old Scone
HoL

Labour's Baroness Young of Old Scone suggests that the government has been "caught on the hop" on this issue.

"How many more unexploded bombs are there?", she asks. 

This government is never caught on the hop, replies Lord Keen. 

Keen: EU and Euratom are 'uniquely legally joined'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Keen of Elie
HoL

In a "face to face" between lawyers and scientists on the issue of science "I know where my money would be," begins Government spokesman (and lawyer) Lord Keen of Elie.

He gives peers a "complete assurance" that the government is committed to maintaining "the highest standard" of nuclear safety and cooperation with Euratom.

He says that the EU and Euratom are "uniquely legally joined" adding that a judge makes no distinction between the two.

Labour's Lord Lea of Crondall intervenes to ask if people voted to leave Euratom in the referendum.

They voted to leave European institutions, replies Lord Keen. 

Labour seeks government assurance on Euratom

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Baroness Hayter begins by declaring her interest in that she is married to a "low temperature physicists".

"Whatever that is," she adds.

Turning to the amendments, she says there have been suggestions that nuclear power stations may have to close if the UK leaves Euratom.

She further notes warnings that the trade in nuclear fuel could "grind to a halt".

She suggests that these warnings may be "alarmist" but asks why there has been no response from the government.

She seeks an assurance that "there is no possibility" of leaving Euratom until equivalent framework is in place.

Liddle: The government is being highly irresponsible

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Liddle
HoL

It is facile, Labour's Lord Liddle argues, to say that the UK has to leave Euratom because the European Court of Justice has jurisdiction over it.

To be "so ideological" as to endanger a British industry is "extraordinary", he argues.

He accuses the government of being highly irresponsible. 

What is Euratom?

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament


          Government representatives discuss the creation of Euratom in 1957
AFP/Getty Images
Government representatives discuss the creation of Euratom in 1957

The House of Lords Library has produced a report on Brexit and Euratom.

It is available to read here

Crossbench peer warns of problems with Galileo project

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Liftoff of the Soyuz rocket carrying Galileo satellites
AFP/Getty Images
Liftoff of the Soyuz rocket carrying Galileo satellites

Crossbencher Lord Rees of Ludlow tells the House that there are similar problems with other international projects.

As examples he offers Galileo, a GPS satellite system and the "set of spacecraft" run as part of the Copernicus project. 

The UK's continued major participation, he argues, will depend on legal adjustments following Brexit.

Peer seeks 'some idea of where this is going'

Brexit Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Inglewood
HoL

Conservative Lord Inglewood rises briefly to say that there is "considerable concern" because people are unsure what the government has in mind. 

Lib Dem peer Lord Fox agrees and asks for "some idea of where this is going".

Specifically he asks how the government will ensure that international collaboration can continue if the UK leaves Euratom.

Government response to defeat in the Lords

Brexit Bill

Responding to the defeat in the Lords on amendment 9B to the Brexit Bill, a spokesperson for the Department for Exiting the EU said: 

We are disappointed the Lords have chosen to amend a Bill that the Commons passed without amendment. The Bill has a straightforward purpose - to enact the referendum result and allow the government to get on with the negotiations. Our position on EU nationals has repeatedly been made clear. We want to guarantee the rights of EU citizens who are already living in Britain, and the rights of British nationals living in other member states, as early as we can.”