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Summary

  1. Day began with questions to Culture, Media and Sport ministers
  2. Business Statement unveils forthcoming business
  3. Statement on decision on Fox's Sky takeover bid
  4. MPs and peers debate Queen's Speech

Live Reporting

By Esther Webber and Patrick Cowling

All times stated are UK

UK and EU flags

Alex Hunt

BBC News

A guide to how the UK will leave the European Union following the 23 June referendum vote.

Read more

Queen's Speech: MPs vote pass government's programme

Whips
HoC

The minority Conservative government has survived its first major Parliamentary test after its Queen's Speech cleared the House of Commons.

MPs voted in favour of the government's proposed legislation - which was stripped back after the Tories lost their majority - by 323 to 309.

The Democratic Unionist Party's 10 MPs had agreed to support the measures as part of a deal with the Tories.

Labour's attempt to add some of its policies to the Queen's Speech failed.

Nearly 50 MPs defied Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn by backing an amendment calling for Britain to stay in the single market and customs union after Brexit, proposed by pro-Remain MP Chuka Umunna.

It was defeated by 322 votes to 101, majority 221, but despite orders to abstain from Mr Corbyn, who has committed to leaving the single market, some 49 Labour MPs opted to back the amendment, revealing divisions within the party over its Brexit strategy.

House adjourns

House of Commons

Parliament

The adjournment debate comes to a close and that brings to an end a busy week in the House of Commons.

MPs will return on Monday at 2.30pm for Home Office questions.

Minister 'reassured' by temporary plan

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Philip Dunne
HoC

Health Minister Philip Dunne responds to the debate, saying that he is reassured by the work of the local clinical commissioning group to put in place a temporary plan to provide high standards of patient care and safety.

End of business in the Lords

House of Lords

Parliament

The House of Lords adjourns, and will return on Monday for questions to ministers at 2.30pm.

Kettering MPs describes local problems

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Philip Hollobone
HoC

Mr Hollobone says the draft sustainability plan for Northamptonshire is "simply not good enough" as it does not put enough funding into facilities allowing people to be treated closer to where they live so that they don't have to come into the hospital.

He says this would be more cost-effective, better for the patients and would take pressure of Kettering General Hospital.

Rumours about Labour MPs being sacked from shadow posts

PoliticsHome editor and political editor of the Daily Mail tweet

Debate on Kettering hospital begins

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Speaker John Bercow says that MPs not wishing to hear Philip Hollobone "expatiate on the merits of his local hospital" in his adjournment debate should leave the chamber quickly and quietly.

He says that those remaining can enjoy the Kettering MP's "Einsteinian intellect and Demosthenesian eloquence".

Resignation from Labour's top team

Former Labour frontbencher resigns

Queen's Speech promises 'broad reform' - minister

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

O'Shaughnessy
HoL

Health Minister Lord O'Shaughnessy responds to the day's debate for the government, insisting that contrary to the "gloomy" tone of some peers this afternoon the Queen's Speech is not just a Brexit prospectus but a "commitment to broader social reform".

He says the government wants to create the "safest health service in the world" and it recognises the "pressure public service workers are under".

However, he adds, he can't support Labour's solution, which he describes as "free things for everyone".

Who in Labour voted for Umunna's amendment?

Political editor, Daily Mail, tweets

Queen's Speech passes

BBC political editor tweets

BreakingMPs approve Queen's Speech

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

After six days of debate, MPs vote to approve the government's legislative agenda for the next two years in its Queen's Speech by 323 votes to 309, a majority of 14.

Labour accuses government of 'holding down' public sector pay

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Hunt
HoL

Labour spokesman Lord Hunt of Kings Heath focuses his concluding comments on the NHS, saying his party would treat the government's promises on mental health "with a touch of scepticism until we see the money ringfenced and actually spent on mental health".

He then turns to a wider point about staffing the service, pointing to the confusion on Wednesday over reports on changes to public sector pay.

"The government cannot artificially hold down the pay of public sector workers year after year," he warns.

What's the Humble Address?

Parliamentary reporters tweet

Some Labour MPs vote with Umunna

BBC political editor and chief reporter for PoliticsHome tweet

View more on twitter
View more on twitter

It appears that while the Labour frontbench abstained on Chuka Umunna's amendment several Labour MPs voted with him.

We'll find out who later on - but in the meantime, political journalists will be trying to find out who those rebels were...

MPs vote on the Queen's Speech

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

After two amendments are defeated MPs now vote on the Queen's Speech itself.

The motion being voted on reads:

That an Humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, as follows: Most Gracious Sovereign, We, Your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, beg leave to offer our humble thanks to Your Majesty for the Gracious Speech which Your Majesty has addressed to both Houses of Parliament."

BreakingSingle market amendment defeated

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Chuka Umunna's amendment to the Queen's Speech, on continued single market and customs union membership has been defeated by 322 votes to 101, a majority of 221.

Lib Dems welcome abortion move

Queen's Speech debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Winding up today's debate for the Lib Dems, Baroness Walmsley says she was going to take the government to task over the cost of abortions for women from Northern Ireland, but notes during the course of the debate ministers have climbed down on this.

She welcomes the move but says: "I regret that it took the threat of a defeat in the other place in order for government to see sense on this."

A reminder of the state of the parties...

Reports that Labour frontbench not supporting Umunna's amendment

SNP MP tweets

Here's the amendment

Parliamentary reporters tweet

Division on continued membership of single market

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Division
HoC

MPs are now voting on Labour MP Chuka Umunna's amendment G which seeks to ensure continued UK membership of the single market and customs union.

The result of the division is expected at 5.30pm.

Labour MP withdraws amendment after government declares support

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Stella Creasy Justine Greening
HoC
Stella Creasy withdraws her amendment as Women and Equalities Minister Justine Greening, who's department is supplying the funding for Northern Ireland women seeking abortions in England and Wales, looks on

Labour MP Stella Creasy had tabled amendment D which seeks to secure funding for women from Northern Ireland to have access to abortions in England and Wales free of charge.

Business Secretary Greg Clark said in the closing speech of the debate that the government could not support the amendment as worded, but the government has pledged to meet the cost.

Ms Creasy says that given the assurances of the government she is happy to withdraw the amendment, saying "let us send a message to women everywhere that in this Parliament their voices will be heard and their rights upheld".

BreakingLabour amendment defeated

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Division result
HoC

The Labour amendment to the Queen's Speech has been defeated by 323 votes to 297, a government majority of 26.

MPs vote on Labour frontbench amendment

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Division
HoC

The debate comes to an end and MPs now divide to vote on the Opposition frontbench's amendment to the Queen's Speech.

The result of the vote is expected at 5.15pm.

View more on twitter

Greg Clark moves Queen's Speech

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Greg Clark
HoC

Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Secretary Greg Clark now concludes the debate on the Queen's Speech.

He has very kind words for MPs who made their maiden speeches in today's debate on all sides of the House.

Mr Clark thanks Stella Creasy and the supporters of her amendment, asking that women from Northern Ireland do not have to pay for abortions in England and Wales, for bringing an injustice to the House,

"We will put that right," he says, but tells Ms Creasy that the government cannot support the amendment as worded and urges her to withdraw it "so we can be united in tackling this issue".

The government best serves the people of the UK by a thriving market economy bringing prosperity for all, he says - as opposed to Labour's desire to "create a socialist state".

Queen's Speech 'a game of rhetoric bingo'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Rebecca Long Bailey
HoC

Labour's shadow business, energy and industrial strategy secretary Rebecca Long Bailey says the Queen's Speech was sadly threadbare and "evaded all substantial questions of policy and did nothing to undo the failed economic policies of the past".

She says that the Conservative approach to austerity was that it was a necessary evil, but says rising inequality, reliance on food banks, and regional inequality show things are "set to get worse".

Ms Long Bailey calls the Queen's Speech a "game of rhetoric bingo".

Britain stands at a crossroads, she says, MPs have a grave choice to make - more economic stagnation under the government or Labour's amendment "which sets out the change Britain needs".

This Parliament will be absorbed by Brexit - new Lib Dem MP

House of Commons

Parliament

Wera Hobhouse
HoC

Wera Hobhouse, the new Lib Dem MP for Bath, gives her maiden speech.

She remembers her mother, who's birthday would have been today, and who remembered the persecution of Nazi terror, as someone born into a half-Jewish family living in Hamburg.

Ms Hobhouse says she was lucky enough to be born in another time, but is determined "never again to go down into the abyss of fanaticism, racial intolerance and exaggerated national pride".

"Whether we like it or not this Parliament will be absorbed by Brexit," she says.

Dover MP says we must all 'do our bit' on Brexit

House of Commons

Parliament

Tory MP Charlie Elphicke tells MPs that Brexit has to be a success and that the UK is prepared for every eventuality.

He says "I hope we have a smooth and easy move out of the European Union" but we have to be prepared, he warns.

"Le't do our bit to make sure it goes right," he says.

He calls for a more productive and fairer economy with everyone paying their fair share of tax, and a resilient economy with a renaissance of the regions.

Umunna - UK cannot stand up to global businesses 'on its own'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Chuka Umunna
HoC

Streatham MP Chuka Umunna, who is moving an amendment this evening, says that the thinking that there is only one way to leave the EU is "dead in the water".

Talking on the subject of his amendment, which calls for continued membership of the European customs union and single market, he says that access to it is "different and inferior" to membership.

Being outside these arrangements, Mr Umunna says, working people across Britain will be worse off and revenue to the Exchequer "will plummet".

He also attacks the idea that the UK can have all the benefits of these organisations on our own, arguing that national government cannot take on the power of global businesses "on its own".

Labour MP promises to 'make every day count'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Gerard Killen
HoC

Gerard Killen makes his maiden speech. He's the new Labour MP for Rutherglen and Hamilton West.

He starts by paying tribute to all those affected by the attacks in Manchester and London, including a constituent of his who was seriously injured in Manchester, and who is now making good progress.

The occasion of a maiden speech is the opportunity to leave a message for the future, he says. "Having served as a local councillor, I've seen at first hand the effect of government austerity," he goes on, saying he's heard of people using candles to heat and light their rooms.

"Stories not from the pages of history but from real life in my constituency in 2017."

He finishes saying that "in this era of fixed term parliaments, I have no idea how long I will have a seat in this place" but will "make every day count".

DUP MP - 'everyone knew what the deal was'

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Sammy Wilson
HoC

Sammy Wilson from the DUP takes opposition MPs to task for their persistent criticisms of the deal his party has made with the Conservative government.

He says the assertions that it was a "backroom" deal are incorrect, "it was published in this House; everyone knows what the deal was".

Mr Wilson says that the arrangement came about because the government sought the influence of their votes and tells SNP MPs they would have done "exactly the same as we did" if approached by the Labour Party in a similar way.

The East Antrim MP says the DUP support the Queen's Speech for committing to the union, for supporting Brexit, and for its shared economic values.

He accuses Labour of fiscal irresponsibility and for supporting parties which have tried to break up the union with violence.

'Nation remains united' following terror attacks, says new MP

House of Commons

Parliament

Faisal Rashid
HoC

Faisal Rashid, the new Labour MP for Warrington South, begins by referring to recent terrorist attacks in London and Manchester.

He tells MPs that Warrington suffered terror attacks in the 1990s. "I say our nation remains united", and democratic principles will prevail, he says.

He goes on to attack the government's policies set out in the Queen's Speech, saying the programme is bereft of measures that will address the harm caused by austerity.

Mr Rashid says he will work to defend the NHS and police, and commits himself to "make Warrington constituents proud".

'I can barely put into words my anger at DUP deal' - Tory MP

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Heidi Allen
HoC

Outspoken Conservative rebel Heidi Allen has some strong words for her government.

She says that her party must change; it must be flexible, dynamic, modern, collaborative, and above all compassionate - "financial and economic competence is not enough". Ms Allen says she wants a Conservative party where people vote for it because they want to "not because they feel they have to".

She goes on to attack the Tory-DUP deal, saying "I can barely put into words my anger at the deal my party has done with the DUP - we didn't need to do it".

Whilst she says she cannot fault the DUP, she says she must "put on record my distaste at the use of public funds to garner political control", instead of running a minority government that showed the country what mature progressive politics looks like.

"This must never again be how this government prioritises spending."

The MP for South Cambridgeshire says that her vote as a backbencher must be earned by the government.

Just in case any MPs on the opposition side of the chamber were wondering if Ms Allen was a new convert; she also gave them both barrels - saying "Labour's policies would lead to economic ruin".

New MP challenges 'false narrative' of multi-national companies

Queen's Speech debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Gillian Keegan
HoC

The new Conservative MP for Chichester, Gillian Keegan, is making her maiden speech in the House of Commons.

She praises the beauty of her Sussex constituency and tells MPs of her apprenticeship in a car factory at the age of 16, which she says gave her the life chance to enable her to have a successful international career.

Ms Keegan challenges what she calls the "false narrative" surrounding multi-national companies and the contribution they make to our society - saying the UK needs the inward investment and jobs these companies bring.