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Summary

  1. Transport questions start Commons day
  2. Business statement outlines forthcoming business
  3. Statement on actions against so-called Islamic State
  4. European Union (Withdrawal) Bill given first reading
  5. Debate on Commemoration of Passchendaele
  6. Peers meet at 11am for questions

Live Reporting

By Esther Webber and Patrick Cowling

All times stated are UK

European Court of Justice

As part of Brexit, the government plans to end the supremacy of EU law - here are the key points.

Read more
EU flag outside Parliament

Ministers hail a historic moment - but Labour and the Scottish and Welsh governments are unhappy.

Read more

Bill to withdraw from the EU: what's in it?

Today, the repeal bill was published and received its first reading.

What is it about?

  • Formally known as the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, the draft legislation is a key plank of the government's Brexit strategy
  • The first line of the bill says the European Communities Act 1972, which took Britain into the EU, will be "repealed on exit day"
  • This will end the supremacy of EU law and stop the flow of new regulations from Brussels
  • But all existing laws derived from the EU will continue to be in force - they can be changed or scrapped by further legislation
  • The bill does not detail policies line-by-line but transfers all regulations into domestic law
  • It gives the UK two years after Brexit to correct any "deficiencies" arising from the transfer.

End of business in the Lords

House of Lords

Parliament

The House of Lords has adjourned and will return on Monday at 2.30pm.

Davis: Repeal Bill will give MPs a say
The Brexit Secretary says MPs will get the chance to debate any changes to laws made using the new legislation.

Government defends diplomatic ties with North Korea

Korean Peninsula debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Goldie
HoL

Winding up for the government, Baroness Goldie speaks of the need to "rigorously enforce sanctions" at the same time as pursuing a "tough and united international response".

She says the UK has "grave concerns" about human rights abuses in North Korea but contrary to Lord Alton's earlier comments, "we should endeavour to keep talking through diplomatic channels" which "does keep going a line of communication".

She agrees China has "a vital role to play" in this matter and it's something the UK will seek to stress in its relations with that country.

Labour urges Russia and China to put pressure on North Korea

Korean Peninsula debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour spokesman Lord Collins of Highbury says the UK should focus its efforts on "how to better ensure accountability of this regime".

If Russia and China do not join efforts to put pressure on North Korea it will be "impossible to hurt them", he adds.

He asks what conversations have been had with US President Donald Trump on sanctions, stipulating that a resolution "cannot be at the expense of the North Korean people who have suffered so much".

House adjourns

House of Commons

Parliament

The debate comes to an end and that brings to a close the week's business in the House of Commons.

MPs return next Monday at 2.30pm.

Minister pledges to address the problem

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

John Hayes
HoC

Transport Minister John Hayes responds to the debate.

He says that the use of vehicles off the highways and on private land "multiplies unimaginably" and lists several examples including building sites, race tracks, and airports - adding that "all drivers" have a duty of care to those about them regardless of where they are.

John Hayes says he understands the frustration of Mr Shelbrooke and says that any change to the law would have to "think more widely" than currently.

He says that although the use of vehicles on the highway and private land differs, "We must not lose sight of the similarities".

It is not straight forward to adjust the law but we must do more to prevent future accidents, he says.

The minister announces that the government will consider how we might address this including the possibility of future legislative reform.

Ex-Army chief warns of security threat from North Korea

Korean Peninsula debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher and former chief of the general staff Lord Stirrup focuses on the "major security challenges" posed by a region "frozen in a divided state between two very different countries".

He says North Korea is in the grip of a "paranoid dictatorship which defies any analysis" and if the United States were drawn into conflict with it this would "destabilise the world more widely".

Repeal bill published

Department for Exiting the EU tweets

Peers debate human rights violations in North Korea

Korean Peninsula debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Alton
HoL

Crossbencher Lord Alton of Liverpool is opening the day's final debate, on security challenges and related human rights violations on the Korean peninsula.

He tells peers: "North Korea is caught in a timewarp" in the form of a "temporary" armistice since the Korean War, and "we now find ourselves on the edge of a nuclear winter".

He says national leaders should issue arrest warrants for North Korean officials and the UK should downgrade its diplomatic presence there.

"This is not a normal nation, but a brutal totalitarian regime," he concludes, "and doing nothing is the worst course of action."

Harry Whitlam death: MP calls for change in law

BBC Leeds and West Yorkshire: background to the case

Harry Whitlam
West Yorkshire Police

Alec Shelbrooke is calling for a change in the law to allow people to be prosecuted for drink driving on private land.

It comes after the death of 11-year-old Harry Whitlam, who was knocked down and killed by a drunk tractor driver on a farm near Leeds in August 2013.

Gary Green was more than twice the legal driving limit but could only be prosecuted over health and safety.

Read more here.

Whitlam's Law debate

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Alec Shelbrooke
HoC

Conservative Alec Shelbrooke is now leading today's adjournment debate on driving offences on private land, and he is urging government to introduce "Whitlam's Law".

Whitlam's Law seeks to end the anomaly that drink-driving laws apply only to vehicles driven on public land. It follows the death of 11-year-old Harry Whitlam who was killed in August 2013.

The Crown Prosecution Service were unable to bring a prosecution because the incident occurred on private land.

Driver Gary Green was more than twice the legal driving limit but could only be prosecuted over health and safety.

'We must never forget soldiers' - minister

Passchendaele commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

John Glen
HoC

Culture, Media and Sport Minister John Glen is concluding the debate for the government, and tells a harrowing first-hand account from a British soldier who describes shooting a comrade to save him from drowning in the mud of Passchendaele.

He says that is crucial to ensure that the soldiers who fought in the battle will never be forgotten, and that it is right that we remember all those who gave the ultimate sacrifice for their country.

'The greatest tribute we can give is to promote peace'

Passchendaele commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Kevin Brennan
HoC

Shadow culture, media and sport Minister Kevin Brennan sums up the debate for the Labour frontbench.

He praises the maiden speech of his countryman Ben Lake, saying that his Ceredigion seat is where the detective programme Hinterland is filmed and that the high murder rate in the television programme puts off some Welsh MPs from visiting.

The murder rate seems to be "almost as high as Oxford in Inspector Morse", he says.

Speaking of the debate, he says it is a hugely appropriate tribute to the soldiers who fought there but says "the greatest tribute we can give is to work to promote peace".

Government defends approach to local authority funding

Local government finance debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Young
HoL

Government spokesman Lord Young of Cookham winds up the debate by paying tribute "to the way they [councils] have made economies and efficiencies and maintained high levels of public satisfaction".

He points out they will see a "modest" 1.2% increase in cash terms from 2015-20, and the government has introduced the improved better care fund and the social care precept of council tax.

Although there was no local government finance bill in the Queen's Speech, he says the matter is "very much on our agenda".

New MP warns of 'steady, silent haemorrhage' of young people in his seat

Passchendaele commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Ben Lake
HoC

Ben Lake, the new Plaid Cymru MP for Ceredigion, is making his maiden speech in the debate.

He says that Wales and rural ares like his cannot be allowed to be forgotten by a "distant central government".

For too long amenities in urban areas are regarded as luxuries for rural communities, Mr Lake says.

The new MP says that his area offers its youth an unrivaled education but offers them "a paucity of job opportunities and affordable housing".

This, he says, has led to a "steady silent haemorrhage" of young people from his community which "saps the life" out of every town the length and breadth of the county.

Deputy speaker sneaks in grandfather tribute

Passchendaele commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Eleanor Laing
HoC

Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing thanks Labour MP Paul Sweeney and Tory MP Stephen Kerr for their tributes to the Highland Light Infantry, in which her grandfather served and was injured in Passchendaele.

Somewhat mischievously, she tells MPs that she is unable to make a tribute from the chair and so thanks Mr Sweeney and Mr Kerr for doing it for her.

New Glasgow Labour MP makes maiden speech

Passchendaele commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Paul Sweeney
HoC

The new Labour MP for Glasgow North East Paul Sweeney is making his maiden speech in the House of Commons.

He speaks with pride about the role in the war effort that Glasgow played in the First and Second World Wars, saying the engineering prowess of the city was "critical".

Mr Sweeney describes how his "Labour citadel" seat once had "a brief dalliance" with Conservative MPs and also praises his SNP predecessor Anne McLaughlin, saying he hopes to work with her in the future on matters of mutual interest.

He says that many of the local problems identified in maiden speeches decades ago "remain stubbornly apparent today".

Labour MP remembering WWI fallen with poem

Labour MP Kevin Brennan recites a Hedd Wyn poem during debate on Passchendaele.

'We are Europeans' - Tory MP

Conservative Andrew Murrison tells MPs we are Europeans regardless of our views on Brexit.

Lib Dems ask for social care solution

Local government finance debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem Lord Shipley warns that the impact of reductions in funding for councils "is steeper on poorer areas".

He's concerned that adult social care provision is being funded from council tax, saying: "That was never what council tax was designed for."

He suggests local authorities will need to look at sharing certain services and incorporating the work of volunteers.

"The government must now clarify how the funding gap will be addressed," he urges.

Labour raises concern over local government funding

Local government finance debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Kennedy
HoL

Labour's Lord Kennedy of Southwark is opening a debate on local government finance and arrangements beyond 2020.

He says that particularly in view of what he terms the "housing crisis" and early years and social care provision, local authorities need "certainty".

He highlights that council tax has not been reevaluated for some time nor business rates, leading to a "terrible state of affairs".

Government has responsibility to taxpayer and public servants, says minister

Public sector pay cap debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Responding for the government, Lord Bates responds to speeches from peers.

Answering Lord Haskel's point of productivity, he says the government is investing to improve productivity.

Lord Bates answers Lord Adonis's comments on university pay and says peers may have been in "some state of shock".

Universities are independent and autonomous, he says, and the government has no plans to intervene in renumeration for university staff at the moment.

Our position remains that we value public servants, and that the government has a responsibility to the taxpayer too, he says.

Maiden speech for Bedford

Passchendaele commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Mohammad Yasin
HoC

Mohammad Yasin, the new Labour MP for Bedford, is making his maiden speech.

He says that local men from Bedford fought at Passchendaele "and many did not come home". The sacrifices of those men "have led to the rights, freedoms and opportunities I'm proudly expressing today".

He says he is the first ethnic minority MP for Bedford and describes his journey from Kashmir to Bedford in 1992,from how he worked first in a factory and then as a taxi driver.

Mr Yasin praises Bedford's diversity, telling MPs that it is the most ethnically diverse town in the UK proportionate to its size and about the people from many places who have made the town their home.

"Differences are not just tolerated but celebrated," he says.

Labour: public servants deserve to stop being taken for granted

Public sector pay cap debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Lord Tunnicliffe asks whether the pay review process can be respected.

The argument from the government also is: what does the balance between affordable and fair? he asks.

But, he says, the Resolution Foundation shows the poorest people in society have 5% less income over the next four years.

Because of inflation, household income has fallen too, he tells peers.

"Public servants...deserve to stop being taken for granted."

Memories of the battle

Passchendaele Commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Paul Flynn
HoC

Labour MP Paul Flynn shows MPs a picture of his father, machine gunner James Flynn. He tells them that his father went to war at the age of 15 and volunteered because he was a great patriot who'd "soaked up the propaganda to go and sort out the Hun".

He says that he was captured by the Germans "to his great relief" because he was dying - and that he survived and lived to 43 because of the care they gave him.

His father went to war to kill Germans and came back as a great admirer of the Germans who saved his life, Paul Flynn tells MPs.

Mr Flynn finishes by describing how his father was cheated by government after the war and says that the UK still does not show adequate gratitude to its soldiers.

He says the commemoration of the first world war should mean that we "never again repeat the old lie that it is sweet and decorous to die for your country".

Short-term policy has gone on too long, says Lib Dem peer

Public sector pay cap debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Bns Kramer
HoL

Lib Dem Baroness Kramer says that the pay cap was brought in at a specific time of economic woes.

We live now, she says, in different economic times, and the public sector has to compete with the private sector to deliver. But public sector workers are facing wage erosion from inflation which is pushing the 3%.

"This surely has become the time to rethink what has become a completely inappropriate policy,"

The praise is heaped on the public sector worker but recent tax cuts have fallen on a different section of society, she points out.

'We need to understand we are Europeans'

Passchendaele Commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Andrew Murrison
HoC

Conservative MP Andrew Murrison says that in the current political climate "there is no country in Europe more engaged in Europe than the UK".

The self-confessed "completely signed up Brexiteer" says "whether we are Brexiteers or not we need to understand we are Europeans", he says.

"That is where we have always been and that is where we will always be," he says.

Mr Murrison urges MPs to take "absolutely no nonsense" from those who say the UK is in some way disengaged from Europe or "poor Europeans".

"This country has always been there when Europe needs us when we have needed to face down the general disturber of the peace," he says.

"I am confident that we will continue to do just that."

Adonis condemns university staff pay

Public sector pay cap debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Adonis
HoL

Labour's Lord Adonis says he wishes to ask two specific questions: whether average salaries of £275,000 for England's university vice chancellors are justified and what the government intends to do to cut vice chancellors' pay.

He says he wants to refer specifically to University of Bath; and he details pay and benefits received by the staff and vice chancellor there.

The university is paying salaries of over £100,000 to 67 staff, he tells peers.

He says the vice chancellor, Professor Glynis Breakwell, with pay and benefits, receives "almost exactly £500,000".

He says he has been contacted by staff and students of the university about the issue.

"The highly-paid should set an example, particularly at a time of pay restraint," he says. The vice chancellor is setting an example of greed, he says.

"I hope the minister will tell us what the government is going to do to stop it."

Tribute to public servants who have seen pay capped

Public sector pay cap debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Haskel
HoL

Labour's Lord Haskel is opening a debate on the 1% cap on public sector pay.

"We've been through difficult times these last few weeks," he says. He says police, nurses and others who have helped the public have had their pay capped.

He criticises the current system of deciding pay "blurs responsibility" and creates dissatisfaction, he says.

Letters to review bodies setting out their work for 2018/19 will soon be going out, he says - what will they say? To review pay on the evidence, or "not to bother" because pay is set at 1%.

Tory MP on why soldiers fought

Passchendaele commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Keith Simpson
HoC

Conservative MP and historian Keith Simpson says he interviewed several survivors of World War One for a writing project in the 1970s, telling MPs that he has a "deep connected memory of the first world war".

He says that for young people, the battle of Passchendaele is as far away for them as the battle of Waterloo.

The sheer extent of the casualties of the battle is what makes younger people take note, he says, as well as the fact that it was extensively photographed.

He adds that many young people he talks to ask him how the young men in the British army endured these battles, and says it was a combination of local interest through the "pals" volunteering process where groups of friends or villages signed up together, a Victorian concept of duty, and small group loyalty.

Mr Simpson also notes that 1917 is the centennial anniversary of the Imperial war graves commission.

He finishes his speech with two poignant individual accounts of the battle from a British and German soldier.

Battle of Passchendaele: Blood and mud

Passchendaele commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Passchendaele
PA

Officially known as the Third Battle of Ypres, Passchendaele became infamous not only for the scale of casualties, but also for the mud.

Ypres was the principal town within a salient (or bulge) in the British lines and the site of two previous battles: First Ypres (October-November 1914) and Second Ypres (April-May 1915). Field Marshal Haig had long wanted a British offensive in Flanders and, following a warning that the German blockade would soon cripple the British war effort, wanted to reach the Belgian coast to destroy the German submarine bases there. On top of this, the possibility of a Russian withdrawal from the war threatened German redeployment from the Eastern front to increase their reserve strength dramatically.

The infantry attack began on 31 July. Constant shelling had churned the clay soil and smashed the drainage systems. The left wing of the attack achieved its objectives but the right wing failed completely. Within a few days, the heaviest rain for 30 years had turned the soil into a quagmire, producing thick mud that clogged up rifles and immobilised tanks. It eventually became so deep that men and horses drowned in it.

Read the full BBC History account of the battle here.

'Futility of war'

Passchendaele commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Kevin Brennan, the shadow culture minister, says the battle stretched from July to November 1917.

"The stalemates of the battle lasted for months," he says. "Casualties on both sides were hard to calculate."

In the minds of many, Passchendaele epitomises for many the futility of war, he says.

He commends organisations who work to ensure we do not forget the sacrifices of World War I; and he says sacrifices made in Wales still continue to resonate 100 years on.

Ceremonies to mark sacrifice

Passchendaele commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Ypres
PA

Mr Glen outlines the ceremonies and commemorations being planned.

You can read more about these plans here.

In case you were confused...

European Union (Withdrawal) Bill

Sean Curran

Parliamentary correspondent

MPs will NOT hold their first debate on the so-called Repeal Bill on Friday even though the Brexit Minister Steve Baker said "tomorrow" when he was asked for the date on the second reading debate.

The Commons is not sitting on Friday and it's simply a parliamentary convention that when a bill is presented for the first time - or given a first reading - a date, usually the next day, is given for second reading.

The second reading debate will give MPs their first chance to debate the general principles in a piece of legislation.

Remembering the battle

Passchendaele commemoration

House of Commons

Parliament

Battle of Passchendaele
PA

Culture Minister John Glen is opening the debate on the commemoration of Passchendaele.

He says the battle was not only infamous for the conditions soldiers laboured under but because a total of 500,000 soldiers on both sides were wounded, killed or missing.

"Unbelievable numbers," he says.

He reminds MPs that soldiers from today's Commonwealth fought alongside British and Irish soldiers.

Many of those who fought in the battle were conscripts, Mr Glen goes on to say - leading to huge changes in the UK, with women working in munitions factories.

But the battle is remembered mostly for the horrors of trench warfare, he says.

Call for more positive attitude towards regulation

Deregulation debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher Lord Best suggests that after a period in which deregulation was all the rage, "we're now ready for a less negative attitude to proper regulations".

He thinks this could be "a cost-effective approach, as well as protecting health and safety" as cost-cutting only leads to greater financial penalties in the long run.

Debate on Monday

Huffington Post's executive editor, politics, tweets