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Summary

  1. MSPs quiz the City of Edinburgh Council on school infrastructure following the closure of 16 schools last year
  2. Health and sport ministers are in the hot seat for portfolio questions
  3. SNP MSP Christina McKelvie leads a debate marking Motor Neurone Disease Global Awareness Day
  4. The Scottish Conservatives lead a debate on transparent government
  5. MSPs debate agriculture in the second Scottish Conservative debate of the day
  6. Tory MSP Alexander Stewart leads a debate on stroke care in Scotland

Live Reporting

By Colin Bell and Craig Hutchison

All times stated are UK

We leave you tonight with this moving tribute to Doddie Weir from Brian Whittle

Doddie Weir 'will call me a big Jessie' says tearful Brian Whittle

MSP Brian Whittle paid an emotional tribute to his friend Doddie Weir, who has been diagnosed with MND.

Speaking during a debate in the Scottish Parliament, a clearly upset Mr Whittle said: "He's going to call me a big Jessie".

The former Scotland international and rugby legend, who earned 61 caps, announced his diagnosis to raise awareness of the condition for Global MND Awareness Day.

That's all from Holyrood Live on Wednesday 21 June 2017.

We're back from 9am tomorrow with the Public Petitions Committee.

Weir, who earned 61 caps for Scotland, wants to help fellow sufferers
SNS
Weir, who earned 61 caps for Scotland, wants to help fellow sufferers

Scottish government must continue to work to tackle inequalities

Aileen Campbell
BBC

Ms Campbell says those that are the most vulnerable are the most at risk.

The public health minister says the Scottish government must continue to work to tackle inequalities.

She says that she hopes Mr Burnett also takes the inequality argument to the UK government.

The government is working to get stroke victims back to independent lives

Stroke
SPL

Ms Campbell says more people are being thrombolysed across the country.

The minister says thrombectomy is being looked at.

She says these advances in medical approaches means people are far more likely to go back to living an independent life after a stroke.

The publc health minister says the government is working with health boards to help stroke victims to get back to indepenent living.

She highlights the stroke improvement plan.

Government taking action on conditions that contribute to strokes

Public Health Minister Aileen Campbell
BBC

Public Health Minister Aileen Campbell says she is pleased to hear that Edwin Collins is recovering well and she thanks him and his family for helping to raise awareness.

Ms Campbell says the government are taking action on the long term conditions which can contribute to strokes.

The public health minister says the government is working to improve the stoke care pathway.

She says that the Stroke Improvement team visits all health boards at least annually.

Minister @ClydesdAileen responding to @ScotParl debate on stroke. Importance of Stroke Care Pathway to improvement across system.

'We have a postcode lottery of care'

Labour MSP Colin Smyth
BBC

Labour MSP Colin Smyth says with more people living with a stroke and relying on community based care, there is more reason for the government to fund this properly.

"We have a postcode lottery of care," he says.

Background: 'I had a stroke at 14'

Brenna Collie was a healthy, sporty 14-year-old who did not expect to have a stroke
Kathleen Collie
Brenna Collie was a healthy, sporty 14-year-old who did not expect to have a stroke

When 14-year-old Brenna Collie from Aberdeenshire told her mother she was having a stroke she was told to stop being a "drama queen".

Brenna, from Strichen, was too young and too healthy to have a stroke, her mother thought.

She has since learned that about 400 UK children have a stroke every year, leaving many with severe physical and mental impairments.

Experts say early recognition is important to minimise the risk of severe long-term health problems.

Brenna told BBC Scotland's John Beattie programme: "I had a bug the day before so I was off school.

Brenna's family said the 14-year-old had made an amazing recovery
Kathleen Collie
Brenna's family said the 14-year-old had made an amazing recovery

Read more of Brenna's story here.

'Underfunded, under-equipped and understaffed, a decade of failure'

Tory MSP Alexander Burnett
BBC

Tory MSP Alexander Burnett says everyone in the chamber will know someone affected by a stroke and that many NHS stroke wards are under-equipped.

Mr Burnett says the Scottish government cannot back up its warm words for stroke patients, saying stroke care is "underfunded, under-equipped and understaffed, a decade of failure" .

How to spot the signs of a stroke?

Elaine Roberts from the Stroke Association
bbc
Elaine Roberts from the Stroke Association

The Stroke Association has warned that women are unaware of the risk. Many wrongly believe a stroke could never happen to them.

30,000 women die of stroke in the UK every year.

Elaine Roberts from the Stroke Association told BBC Breakfast in 2014 that "people need to know they have a healthy blood pressure".

Click here for the interview:

Community care and self management must be backed by investment

Labour MSP Anas Sarwar
BBC

Labour MSP Anas Sarwar says thanks all those involved in stroke care for their work in the area.

Mr Sarwar says it is right to put a focus on community care and self management but that it must be backed up by investment and that there is currently a "postcode lottery".

Background: Stroke survivor: Virtual Reality helped me walk again

Shannon Mackey has been using virtual reality to help recover from a stroke.

17-year-old Shannon Mackey was about to have her last radiotherapy session to remove a brain tumour when she suffered a stroke, leaving her wheelchair-bound and unable to use the left side of her body.

In addition to traditional physiotherapy sessions, she has been attending virtual reality sessions at the charity-run Brain and Spinal Injury Centre (BASIC).

Now 19, Shannon has regained motion in her arms and is once again able to walk unaided.

"[Virtual Reality sessions] have helped so much", she told BBC Radio 5 live. "If I didn’t come here I don’t think I’d be where I am today."

Impacts of the life changing effects of strokes cannot be underestimated

Tory MSP Allison Harris
BBC

Tory MSP Allison Harris says national statistics show a downward spiral of people's mortality rates from strokes and she says this is welcome.

Mr Harris says the impacts of the life changing effects of strokes cannot be underestimated.

Background: Edwyn Collins film to raise awareness about strokes

Art work from Edwyn Collins' film The Possibilities are Endless
Pulse Films
Art work from Edwyn Collins' film The Possibilities are Endless

A film about songwriter Edwyn Collins was given a special screening to raise awareness about strokes.

Edinburgh-born Collins went into a coma after suffering a stroke and two haemorrhages in 2005.

The Possibilities are Endless, explores his journey from the brink of death to rediscovering memories lost because of his medical condition.

NHS Highland and Chest Heart and Stroke Scotland hosted the screening in Inverness on 17 September 2015.

There must be a focus on tackling the conditions which cause strokes

SNP MSP Mare Todd
BBC

SNP MSP Mare Todd says that there must be a focus on tackling the conditions which cause strokes.

Ms Todd says popstar Edwyn Collins suffered a stroke and 12 years on he is still getting better.

Background: Stroke Association in Scotland

Stroke Association
Stroke Association
Stroke Association

From the Stroke Association in Scotland website:

"Stroke is the third most common killer in Scotland and the leading cause of disability.

"We believe in life after stroke.

"That’s why we support stroke survivors to make the best recovery they can.

"It’s why we campaign for better stroke care and why we fund research into finding new treatments and ways of preventing stroke."

Tory MSP says constituent felt 'abandoned' by some of the stroke after care

Tory MSP Alexander Stewart
BBC

Tory MSP Alexander Stewart says one of his constituents spoke to him about a stroke experienced by his wife around one year ago.

Mr Stewart says she ended up in a stroke unit which had no specialised nurses.

The Tory MSP says whilst the people delivering rehab were good, they were spread very thinly.

He says that the rehab continued at home but there were pressures to end this.

Mr Stewart says they felt "abandoned" by some of the care.

He pays tribute to those who work in the sector.

Mr Stewart says there is much more to be achieved in after care.

Background: Chest, Heart and Stroke Scotland

From the Chest, Heart and Stroke Scotland website:

What is a stroke?

A stroke happens when the blood supply to part of the brain is interrupted. As a result brain cells get less of the oxygen and nutrients that they need. Some brain cells can become damaged and others can die.

There are two types of stroke:

  • Ischaemic stroke – this type of stroke occurs when a blood clot blocks one of the arteries which carries blood to the brain. About 85 in every 100 strokes are ischaemic.
  • Haemorrhagic stroke – this type of stroke occurs as a result of bleeding within or around the brain from a burst blood vessel. Approximately 15 in every 100 strokes are haemorrhagic.
Chest, Heart and Stroke Scotland
Chest, Heart and Stroke Scotland
Chest, Heart and Stroke Scotland

"We are Scotland’s health charity.

"Helping people live longer, stronger lives

"Our mission is to improve the quality of life for people in Scotland affected by chest, heart and stroke illness, through medical research, influencing public policy, advice and information and support in the community."

Background: Stroke patients help study into brain bleeding

New scanner could aid stroke and dementia diagnosis

troke patients are helping scientists at Edinburgh University understand what might cause bleeding in the brain.

A new powerful combined scanner is being used to detect a build-up of abnormal proteins.

The experts said it may give a clearer understanding of what causes conditions such as strokes and dementia.

The new scanner combines MRI imaging which gives structural details of the brain with PET scanning that looks at brain activity.

Call for more stroke nurses and support systems

Mr Stewart also uses his motion to highlight:

  • a welcome long-term downward trend in mortality rates, with a 39% decrease between 2006 and 2016
  • around 124,000, are living with the long-term effects of stroke, half of whom have a disability
  • in the most deprived areas, the mortality rate in 2015 for such cerebrovascular diseases was 42.3% higher than the least deprived
Stroke X-Ray
Getty Images
  • people in remote and rural areas can face issues in accessing clinical care
  • this includes access to thrombectomy, which is unavailable outside Edinburgh and Glasgow as there are only three clinicians trained to carry out this procedure in Scotland, compared with over 80 in England and Wales
  • the need for greater investment to help tackle what it sees as this inequity
  • outside the work of the recognised charities, only NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde and NHS Tayside offer specialist follow-up nursing, but with more limited scope and timescales
  • there is an urgent need for further investment in high quality aftercare, more stroke nurses and support systems and pathways in place in communities

Every year,14,000 people in Scotland experience stroke

Patient
Kupicoo

Mr Stewart uses his motion to say every year,14,000 people in Scotland experience stroke, which is the third most common cause of death and the most common cause of severe physical disability among adults.

The Conervative MSP says stroke patients account for 7% of all NHS beds and that treatment for the condition takes up 5% of the NHS budget.

He highlights the benefits of organised specialist care in improving outcomes and the recent SIGN guidelines that focus on acute care and secondary prevention

Mr Stewart emphasises the importance of providing access to specialist services quickly.

Here is the motion for the debate

motion for the debate
Scottish Parliament

Stroke care in Scotland

Stroke X-ray
bbc

Tory MSP Alexander Stewart will now lead a member's debate on stroke care in Scotland.

MSPs back tail docking ban for some working dogs

Dog
PA

MSPs vote that the Prohibited Procedures on Protected Animals (Exemptions) (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 2017 [draft] be approved.

This will allow the tail docking of two breeds of working dogs used in shooting.

86 MSPs back it, 29 vote against and there are 9 abstentions.

The Tory CAP motion, as amended by the government, is agreed to

The Tory CAP motion, as amended by the government, is agreed to with 80 MSPs backing it and with 36 against and with 8 abstentions.

Tory amendment
Scottish Parliament

The Labour CAP amendment is not agreed to

The Labour CAP amendment is not agreed to.

Labour amendment
Scottish Parliament

The government CAP amendment is agreed to

The government CAP amendment is agreed to with 61 MSPs backing it and 57 against

Government amendment
Scottish Parliament

The Tory FOI motion as amended is agreed to

The Tory FOI motion as amended is agreed to.

Motion
Scottish Parliament

The government FOI amendment is agreed to

The government FOI amendment is agreed to

FOI amendment
Scottish Parliament

Decision time is next.............

We now move to decision time where MSPs will vote on the motion and amendments from the transparent government and agriculture debates.

Point of Order

Labour MSP Neil Findlay says the motion on FOI and amended by the government calls for an independent review.

Mr Findlay says it is important that we know what is being voted for because the "heartless minister" seemed to think that the vote is for something else.

Presiding Officer Ken Macintosh says it is up to members to debate and vote on the motion.

Minister believes tail shortening will improve the welfare of shooting dogs

Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham
bbc
Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham

Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham says the 2010 regulations did impose an outright ban on tail docking.

Ms Cunningham says the exemption is only for dogs involved in shooting activities.

She says the government firmly believes the exemption will improve the welfare of these dogs, preventing tail injury.

Ms Cunningham says the exemption only applies to Spaniels and Hunt Point Retrievers and she says only vets can shorten the tails.

She says the amendment will improve the welfare of dogs involved in this lawful activity.