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Summary

  1. The Public Petitions Committee takes evidence on a petition calling for the review of section 11 of the Children (Scotland) Act 1995
  2. MSPs quiz ministers during general questions on issues including ScotRail, the Scottish Growth Scheme and policing in Edinburgh
  3. Opposition party leaders quiz Nicola Sturgeon during first minister's questions
  4. Lib Dem MSP Tavish Scott will then lead a debate celebrating the Island Games
  5. Finance Secretary Derek Mackay will then give a ministerial statement on the Provisional Outturn 2016-17
  6. MSPs will then debate the Limitation (Childhood Abuse) (Scotland) Bill for the final time

Live Reporting

By Craig Hutchison and Colin Bell

All times stated are UK

Goodnight from Holyrood Live

Holyrood
BBC

That brings to an end our coverage of the Scottish Parliament for Thursday 22 June 2017.

We'll be back on Tuesday in the final week before parliamentary recess.

Have a good weekend.

UPSUM: MSPs lift time bar on childhood abuse compensation cases

Victims of abuse dating back to 1964 will now be able to seek damages through the courts
PA
Victims of abuse dating back to 1964 will now be able to seek damages through the courts

The three-year limit on survivors of childhood abuse suing for damages has been scrapped by MSPs.

The move allows victims of abuse dating back as far as 1964 to seek compensation for their injuries though the civil courts.

Victims currently have just three years from the date of their injury - or from their 16th birthday - to bring a court action.

The limit has been removed by the Limitation (Childhood Abuse) Bill.

The bill was unanimously approved when MSPs voted in the Scottish Parliament, by a margin of 115 to zero.

Presiding officer says the matter can be raised next week

Presiding Officer Ken Macintosh says he notes the member's comments and says this matter can be raised next week.

Here's some detail on the point of order raised after decision time

Tory MSP Finlay Carson
BBC

Tory MSP Finlay Carson says it has just emerged the government has now sought an extension for the delivery of CAP payments because it will not meet the deadline.

Mr Carson says the first minister was asked about this by Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson earlier and did not answer.

He asks what the point is of first minister's questions if the questions are not answered.

BreakingMSPs unanimously vote to pass the Limitation (Childhood Abuse) (Scotland) Bill

MSPs unanimously vote to pass the Limitation (Childhood Abuse) (Scotland) Bill.

Minister thanks all survivors for their bravery and persistence

Ms Ewing
bbc
Ms Ewing

Ms Ewing says the government believes it has found the correct balance.

The minister thanks all of those who provided evidence and engaged with the process.

She says most importantly she wants to thank all survivors for their bravery and persistence in ensuring the Limitation (Childhood Abuse) (Scotland) Bill came into being.

Courts and tribunal service may be able to absorb the cases within current structure says minister

Ms Ewing says it is important that survivors are able to access quality legal advice.

The legal affairs minister says time-bar has presented a barrier in the past.

She says she cannot say what the impact will be on the courts and tribunal service but that they are of the view that the cases may be able to be absorbed within the current structure.

Ms Ewing says it is impossible to say what the costs will be which is why the amendment was not accepted.

Minister says it is important survivors are supported on an individual basis

Legal Affairs Minister Annabelle Ewing
bbc
Legal Affairs Minister Annabelle Ewing

Legal Affairs Minister Annabelle Ewing says the Bill is designed to remove a barrier to survivors of historic childhood abuse.

Ms Ewing says in passing the Bill parliament will be recognising survivors have been let down by the justice system.

The minister says raising a civil action may not be right for every survivor but the Bill widens the options for survivors.

She says it is important survivors are supported on an individual basis.

Tory MSP says the Bill helps achieve access to justice for survivors

Ms Mitchell says despite the minister's reference to an adjustment to the explanatory notes these concerns remain.

She says it will be down to the courts to decide on these issues.

The Justice Committee convener raises the concerns about the resources needed for the Bill, the point raised in Oliver Mundell's amendment.

The Tory MSPs says this issue still needs to be resolved.

She says the Bill helps achieve access to justice for survivors of historic childhood abuse.

It took considerable courage for the survivors to give evidence says Tory MSP

Tory MSP Margaret Mitchell
BBC

Tory MSP Margaret Mitchell says it took considerable courage for the survivors to give evidence.

Ms Mitchell says the removal of the three year time-bar brings an end to an insurmountable barrier.

She says that pursuing a civil action will not be the right course for all survivors.

She says she introduced the Apologies Act as a member's bill and it is unfortunate that the government's secondary legislation involving complex issues potentially thwarts part of the Act.

Labour MSP thanks the bravery, patience and support of every survivor during this process

Ms Fee says the inclusion of neglect rightly widens the scope of the Bill.

The Labour MSP ensures the maximum support and protection for survivors.

She says this is a historic Bill and she says no contribution was more powerful or persuasive than that of Johann Lamont.

The Labour MSP says all survivors must have guidance if they choose to take a claim forward

She thanks the bravery, patience and support of every survivor during this process which has been commendable.

Bill would not have been possible without the 'bravery and persistence' of survivors

Labour MSP Mary Fee
BBC

In closing for her party, Labour MSP Mary Fee thanks the external organisations for their input on this Bill.

Ms Fee says without the bravery and patience of survivors, the Bill would not have been possible.

The Labour MSP says she cannot stress the importance of the right support being available to survivors enough.

She says all survivors must have access to guidance and support to ensure they do not suffer more trauma.

SNP MSP says this Bill is so important to thousands of the most vulnerabl

SNP MSP Rona Mackay
bbc
SNP MSP Rona Mackay

SNP MSP Rona Mackay says this Bill is so important to thousands of the most vulnerable and wronged people in society.

Ms Mackay says three years is not long enough as survivors of child abuse simply need longer.

She says the Tory amendment was unworkable and would delay justice for survivors, but she commends Tory MSP Oliver Mundell on his speech.

She says the Bill is not a panacea for survivors.

'We need to make sure there are the right resources for our court system'

Tory MSP Jeremy Balfour
BBC

Tory MSP Jeremy Balfour says a number of witnesses questioned the assumptions in the financial memorandum and says Police Scotland recommended further work on this.

Mr Balfour says he hopes the government will undertake this work.

The Tory MSP says another concern was the capacity of the courts and he says there must be more planning on how the courts will cope.

"We need to make sure there are the right resources for our court system," he says.

SNP MSP says survivors just want MSPs to get on with it and do something

SNP MSP Stewart Stevenson
bbc
SNP MSP Stewart Stevenson

SNP MSP Stewart Stevenson survivors just want MSPs to get on with it and do something.

Mr Stevenson says the testimony of survivors was moving beyond belief.

He says there are new threats coming over the horizon which must be dealt with including child abuse on the internet.

Legislation will be seen as long overdue justice

Lib Dem MSP Alex Cole-Hamilton
BBC

Lib Dem MSP Alex Cole-Hamilton says children were let down and damaged in the most horrific ways imaginable.

Mr Cole-Hamilton says he has worked amongst providers of care and survivors of abuse for most of his career.

He says victims have previously faced restrictions in bringing civil cases to court and this Bill rights that wrong.

The Lib Dem MSP says this has been a consensual debate which he is grateful for and he is confident that this legislation will be seen as long overdue justice.

Green MSP says this is very positive legislation but only removes one of the hurdles faced

Green MSP John Finnie
bbc
Green MSP John Finnie

Green MSP John Finnie says the survivors who gave evidence were very worthy ambassadors for their group and says the Justice Committee learned a lot from them.

Mr Finnie says he takes a rights based approach to everything and he says the retrospective aspect of the Billis unusual and a special limitations regime is entirely appropriate.

The former senior policeman says this is very positive legislation but it only removes one of the hurdles faced.

He says going ahead is about prevention which is about education and obligations to challenge wrong.

Mr Finnie says he hopes people come forward.

Important to understand that there was denial that abuse occurred says Ms Lamont

Johann Lamont
BBC

Labour MSP Johann Lamont says those who supported the amendment did so because they felt it was necessary and had nothing to do with delaying the Bill.

Ms Lamont says it was about the Scottish government underpinning resources for the Bill.

The Labour MSP says it is important to understand that there was denial that abuse occurred within the system.

She says there is a bit of unfinished business in relation to those who had those children in their care and did not speak up for them.

Tory MSP calls on the government to keep a constant and very close review of resources

Tory MSP Miles Briggs
bbc
Tory MSP Miles Briggs

Tory MSP Miles Briggs says it is right the parliament moves the three year time barrier so that survivors do not have to undertake the difficult task of persuading a court to remove it.

Mr Briggs says the time bar has only been removed once 40 years ago.

He says he was disappointed Oliver Mundell's amendment was rejected and he calls on the government to keep a constant and very close review of the issue of resource and take the action to ensure the court system is adequately resourced.

SNP MSP says it is absolutely right the time bar is removed for these horrible offences

SNP MSP Fulton MacGregor
bbc
SNP MSP Fulton MacGregor

SNP MSP Fulton MacGregor says it is absolutely right the time bar is removed for these horrible offences.

Mr MacGregor highlights the work of the Moira Anderson Foundation and tells a moving tale about a man who was abused in his teens by a trusting adult.

He says he hopes this man will be able to take advantage of this Bill.

Decision time is confirmed for 4.45pm

The deputy presiding officer confirms decision time will now be at 4.45pm.

The Act must be properly resourced says Labour MSP

Ms Baker says the new legislation does not apply to those abused before 1964 and a financial redress scheme could address that point.

The Labour MSP says this Bill will help a group of people that deserve justice.

She says the Act must be properly resourced.

The Bill provides choice for survivors and support must be made available

Labour MSP Claire Baker
bbc
Labour MSP Claire Baker

Labour MSP Claire Baker says the financial memorandum says the cost to the Bill is unquantifiable and the government needs to resolve this.

Ms Baker raises concerns around insurance and says this is a demand led response.

She says the debate over the amendment should focus the government's mind to ensure sufficient funds are available.

Ms Baker says not all survivors will want to pursue a case.

She says the Bill provides choice for survivors and calls for support to be made available to those who bring civil actions.

Background: Abuse inquiry: State tried to 'insulate' children in care

Lady Smith
Nick Mailer
Lady Smith

Scotland's child abuse inquiry heard the state had a "very judgmental" attitude towards children in poverty in the first half of the 20th Century, on 1 June 2017.

Prof Kenneth Norrie was the first witness to give evidence in public at the hearing in Edinburgh.

He told how lawmakers had sought to "insulate" youngsters from poor backgrounds from negative influences.

He said "there was a very judgmental attitude towards children, even children in poverty" at the time.

More than 60 institutions, including several top private schools and church bodies, are being investigated.

The inquiry, which is being chaired by Lady Smith, is looking in detail at historical abuse of children in residential care.

It is expected to report in late 2019 - four years after it was set up.

Prof Norrie, of the University of Strathclyde's Law School, guided the hearing through developments in legislation surrounding children, juvenile offenders and child protection from the early to mid-20th Century.

Read more here.

Government needs to address the ongoing concerns over costs says Labour MSP

Labour MSP Claire Baker
BBC

Labour MSP Claire Baker says she is pleased the Bill has reached its final stage and that it can be argued that this legislation is too late.

Ms Baker says it is an extremely difficult crime to acknowledge and that the Bill has been introduced in the shade of the Child Abuse Inquiry.

The Labour MSP says it is crucial that the Inquiry delivers answers.

She says the government does need to address the ongoing concerns over costs.

'No longer will our legal system aid and abet those who deserve no mercy'

Oliver Mundell
bbc

Mr Mundell says for survivors this legislation sends a powerful message.

He says: "No longer will our legal system aid and abet those who deserve no mercy."

Mr Mundell says: "By removing the time bar we are removing the barrier that stands in the way of some victims."

This is the start not the end of a journey he says.

Mr Mundell says there are some who have suffered who are no longer afraid and asks the government to keep an eye on how the changes work and are funded.

'It is the survivors who have delivered this Bill'

Tory MSP Oliver Mundell says to call what happened an "atrocity" is inadequate.

On behalf of the Scottish Conservatives, "to all those who have experienced abuse, we are truely sorry," he says.

Mr Mundell says he will never forget the survivor that told him that the abuse she suffered destroyed part of her soul.

"It is the survivors who have delivered this Bill," he says.

'Vile monsters have been allowed to hide behind the law.'

Tory MSP Oliver Mundell
bbc
Tory MSP Oliver Mundell

The deputy presiding officer informs the chamber that decision time may be postponed to 4.45pm to allow more debate.

Tory MSP Oliver Mundell says this legislation is no panacea but he stresses the significance of changing the law to survivors.

Mr Mundell says: "Vile monsters have been allowed to hide behind the law."

He says many have held elected office and he says "we must take our share or responsibiity".

Bill will make a difference for survivors says minister

Ms Ewing says in October 2015 the government established the independent Child Abuse Inquiry and supported the Apologies Bill.

The legal affairs minister says these measures, along with this Bill, will make a difference for survivors.

She moves that the Bill should be passed.

Background: Scottish child abuse inquiry: Senior panel member resigns

Glenn Houston (L) was the only original member of the inquiry panel after Susan O'Brien QC and Michael Lamb resigned
Scottish government
Glenn Houston (L) was the only original member of the inquiry panel after Susan O'Brien QC and Michael Lamb resigned

A third senior figure on the Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry resigned in February.

Glenn Houston, who was the only original panel member, cited personal reasons for his departure.

He remained on the inquiry team last year after the resignation of the chairwoman, Susan O'Brien QC, and panel member Prof Michael Lamb.

One survivors' group said it was "indicative of a crisis" in the inquiry which is examining allegations of child abuse in residential accommodation.

Andi Lavery, spokesman for the survivors' group White Flowers Alba, said victims were rapidly losing confidence in the inquiry's credibility.

And Alan Draper, from In Care Abuse Survivors, said survivors were "at a loss" to understand what was happening.

Read more here.

Minister says the Bill allows previously raised cases to be re-raised

Ms Ewing
bbc

Ms Ewing says the Bill allows previously raised cases to be re-raised.

The legal affairs minister says changes have been made to the explanatory notes about the burden of proof.

The minister says she has made every effort to make sure the measures in the bill are measured and justified.

She says the issue of prescription has become a source of regret to survivors and says she regret the Bill does not address it.