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Summary

  1. Brazil's lower house approves impeachment proceedings against President Rousseff
  2. Opponents secure the required two-thirds majority after a marathon voting session
  3. Rousseff's opponents celebrate the result across the country
  4. The Senate will now vote on whether to launch an impeachment trial
  5. Ms Rousseff is accused of manipulating government accounts
  6. She denies the claims and accuses opponents of mounting a "coup"

Live Reporting

By Nalina Eggert

All times stated are UK

End of live coverage

That is the end of our live page coverage for now. You can keep up to date with the developments in the Brazil impeachment proceedings in the Latin America section of bbc.com/world, or by following the 'Brazil political crisis' tag on your BBC news app.

What you need to know as impeachment process moves to Senate

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff
Reuters

Here is what you need to know about Sunday's vote as we finish our live coverage for now:

  • The lower house has voted to start impeachment proceedings against President Rousseff over charges that she manipulated government accounts, whichshe denies;
  • The process has now moved to the upper house which is expected to suspend Ms Rousseff next month while it carries out a formal trial;
  • Ms Rousseff has accused her opponents of staging "a coup" against her; many of them say she has lost the ability to govern;
  • She is expected to make her first remarks following the vote later on Monday;
  • Experts say her very low approval ratings are a result of Brazil's deep recession and a corruption investigation at the state-controlled oil company Petrobras that has implicated many figures in her Workers' Party;
  • You can find here our comprehensive round-up of the latest events;
  • Here we look at how things went wrong for Ms Rousseff;
  • We also have a profile of the president, once considered to be Brazil's "Iron Lady"

Senate process 'likely to move very fast'

Now that the lower house of Congress has voted for impeachment proceedings to continue, the process will move to the Senate.

There it is "likely to move very fast", the BBC's Daniel Gallas in Sao Paulo says.

"The vote at the lower house was the best chance President Rousseff had of blocking the proceedings, where she needed just a third of the vote.  

"At the Senate, a simple majority is needed to get the impeachment process going."

A Senate vote is expected to be held in early May. Reports suggest that a majority of the 81 senators will vote in favour of her removal. 

Rousseff 'to address Brazil' following impeachment vote

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff
Getty

President Dilma Rousseff on Monday will make her first comments following the lower house vote approving impeachment proceedings against her, Attorney General Jose Eduardo Cardozo said.

'Isolated and unpopular'

The Wall Street Journal says Dilma Rousseff overcame cancer and torture to become Brazil's first female president, but could "leave as an isolated, unpopular leader".

'She will fight'

A defiant message has appeared on President Rousseff's Facebook page.

Facebook screen grab
Facebook

It reads: If you think President Dilma will bow down before today's decision, you are mistaken.

She will fight alongside everyone who defends democracy, and who wants the rule of law to be upheld in Brazil.

Supporters on the streets

Supporters of President Rousseff have been tweeting pictures of people who turned out to protest against impeachment.

Many of the tweets refer to the impeachment vote as a "golpe" Portuguese for coup.

Não aceitamos o golpe contra a democracia e nossos direitos! bit.ly/23RgkD4

Não aceitamos o golpe contra a democracia e nossos direitos! bit.ly/23RgkD4

O povo contra o golpe foi às ruas neste domingo bit.ly/1S4od43

O povo contra o golpe foi às ruas neste domingo bit.ly/1S4od43

Enquanto o povo grita "Não ao golpe" do lado de fora, golpistas votam sim lá dentro! #RespeiteAsUrnas

Enquanto o povo grita "Não ao golpe" do lado de fora, golpistas votam sim lá dentro! #RespeiteAsUrnas

What are Rousseff's options?

President Rousseff denies wrongdoing and says she will not resign.

She could appeal to Brazil's highest court, the Supreme Federal Tribunal, to try to annul the impeachment process on the grounds that the accusations were faulty.

Good fun or beyond acceptable?

The BBC's Paul Moss saw protesters carry a mock coffin with President Rousseff's first name on it.

All in good fun or beyond acceptable? Pro-impeachment protestors carrying mock #DilmaRousseff coffin today. #Brazil

All in good fun or beyond acceptable? Pro-impeachment protestors carrying mock #DilmaRousseff coffin today. #Brazil

Who is Dilma Rousseff?

Brazil's first female president, she is the protege of her predecessor, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva.

She was part of the underground resistance against Brazil's military dictatorship, and in 1970 she was caught, imprisoned and tortured.

Her time as president has been marred by widespread protests and economic woes.

Dilma Rousseff: profile

Anti-government protesters celebrate

Opponents of President Dilma Rousseff celebrate after the lower house of congress votes to proceed with her impeachment in Brasilia on 17 April 2016.
Reuters
Brazilians cheer in the streets after lower house passes impeachment against President Rousseff
Reuters
Opponents of President Dilma Rousseff celebrate after the Lower House of Congress voted to proceed with her impeachment in Porto Alegre April 17, 2016.
Reuters

Attorney general's 'indignation'

Brazil's attorney general told reporters that the vote was "purely political".

Jose Eduardo Cardozo said none of the MPs discussed relevant facts in the case against President Rousseff.

He expressed "indignation and sadness" at the vote, which he described as "a blow to democracy".

Mr Cardozo was involved in Dilma Rousseff's campaign in 2010, when she was first elected president.

"Destiny has honoured me"

For the impeachment motion to pass the lower house of Congress, 342 members needed to vote for it.

Watch the moment when Bruno Araujo, the 342nd MP, cast his deciding vote - he said it was his destiny.

The vote that sent President Rousseff's impeachment proceedings to the Senate.

How they voted vs how they said they would vote

Fifteen MPs switched from being undecided to voting for impeachment.

The Brazilian newspaper O Globo has tallied up (in Portuguese) how MPs' early voting indications matched with actual votes.

Of the other undecided MPs, 10 voted against the measure, while one abstained.

The other five MPs who abstained had previously said they were against the measure.

The two MPs who were absent for the vote previously reported that they had not yet decided how to vote.

None of these changes affected the final outcome.

Workers' Party calls people to streets

The governing Workers' Party has released a statement following the approval of an impeachment motion against President Rousseff in the lower house of Congress.

In it, the party says that "the most reactionary forces in this country have won the first battle in their attempt to oust President Dilma Rousseff".

The party calls on all men and women who believe in democracy to take to the streets to protest against what it calls "fraudulent impeachment".

"We will not allow that our democracy, which was achieved by the fight and the lives given by so many patriots be destroyed by the hatred of those who always battle against the emancipation of the Brazilian people," it adds.

Voting finishes in Brazil's lower house

Here are the final voting figures:

367 MPs voted for impeachment proceedings.

137 voted against.

Seven MPs abstained and two were not present.

Government 'confident' Rousseff can survive

Reuters news agency is reporting that President Rousseff's Chief of Staff has reacted to the impeachment measure voted through the lower house of Congress.

Jaques Wagner, who is a founding member of the Workers' Party, is reported as saying that the government is confident the Senate will dismiss the measure, which he describes as a setback for democracy that was "orchestrated" by her opponents.

Celebrations erupt at anti-government protests

e to the streets as lawmakers vote for pending impeaching proceedings on President Dilma Rousseff 17/04/2016 European Photopress Agency epa05264835 A demonstrator reacts as he, along with hundreds of people, watches a screen displaying the Chamber of Deputies"s discussion, at Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo, Brazil, 17 April 2016
EPA
Hundreds of people watch a screen displaying the Chamber of Deputies"s discussion, at Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo, Brazil, 17 April 2016.
EPA

What happens next?

Now that the lower house of Congress has voted for impeachment proceedings to continue, all eyes will be on the upper house, the Senate.

The Senate will now have to decide whether to start an impeachment trial against Ms Rousseff.

A simple majority is needed.

The vote is expected to be held in early May. 

Impeachment measure approved in lower house of Congress

A two-thirds majority in the lower house of Congress - 342 MPs - has voted for an impeachment motion against Dilma Rousseff.

The measure will now pass to the Senate.

A pro-impeachment demonstrator kisses a Brazilian flag in Rio de Janeiro, 17 April

Brazil's lower house of congress votes to start impeachment proceedings against President Dilma Rousseff, accused of manipulating government figures.

Read more

Cheering in the country's colours

The BBC's Wrye Davies tweets a photograph of a crowd, some wearing Brazil football tops, cheering as Dilma Rousseff looks set for defeat in the lower house of Congress. 

Opponents of President Rousseff wore yellow and green to indicate their preference in the vote, while supporters of the Workers' Party wore red.

Jubilant supporters in the "yes" camp in #Brasilia as they sense impeachment vote victory. #Brazil

Jubilant supporters in the "yes" camp in #Brasilia as they sense impeachment vote victory. #Brazil

BreakingRousseff set to lose impeachment vote

Breaking News image
BBC

Brazil's governing Workers' Party admits defeat in a lower house impeachment vote against President Dilma Rousseff.

A pro-impeachment demonstrator kisses a Brazilian flag in Rio de Janeiro, 17 April

Rousseff loses impeachment vote

Brazil's lower house of congress votes to start impeachment proceedings against President Dilma Rousseff, accused of manipulating government figures.

Read more

Rousseff supporters increasingly despondent

The mood among supporters of President Rousseff darkened as her opponents got closer to the 342 they need for the impeachment proceedings to move to the next stage.  

Hundreds of people watch a screen displaying the Chamber of Deputies' discussions in Brasilia, Brazil, 17 April 2016
EPA
Hundreds of people watch a screen displaying the Chamber of Deputies" discussions in Brasilia, Brazil, 17 April 2016.
EPA

Gridlock to come?

A 2015 article in Forbes magazine predicted that there would be "gridlock" in Brazil's Congress if President Rousseff was impeached.

"Impeaching the president won’t solve [Brazil's] problems," wrote Kenneth Rapoza at the time.

Who would replace Dilma Rousseff?

MPs are still voting on the impeachment of Dilma Rousseff.

But with the votes very close to a majority, the country's Workers' Party has conceded defeat.

It does not mean President Rousseff has lost her position. The matter will go to the Senate for another vote, this time on whether to launch a trial.

What if she is impeached?

BBC News takes a look at who could be the next President of Brazil.

Pro-impeachment forces short of only 20 votes now

The pro-impeachment camp in the lower house of Congress only needs 20 more votes to reach the 342 votes needed for the impeachment proceedings to reach the next stage, 

Anti-government protesters start celebrations

epa05264793
EPA

Workers' Party leader in Congress admits vote defeat

BBC Brasil's reporter in the lower house of Congress, Mariana Schreiber, says the government has admitted defeat but that it vows to take its fight to the next stage.

She says the leader of the Workers' Party in the lower house, Jose Guimaraes, said the battle would now be fought in the streets and in the Senate. 

"The government is united in its aim to prevent the coup in the Senate."

Voting reaches its final stage

Five hours after the voting began, almost 400 MPs have had their say. The tally so far is: 293 "yes" votes; 96 "no" votes; four abstentions and two absent MPs.

Crowds follow all twists and turns

Opponents and supporters are glued to giant screens as the voting enters its final stage

'Afraid of losing everything' - Rousseff supporter

A supporter of Dilma Rousseff in Sao Paulo tells BBC Brasil reporter Rafael Barifouse of her worries:

I'm worried that we will lose everything we won in these past years in this storm which is approaching. I live on the outskirts, I come from a poor family, I managed to get an education and now I bring home a salary. I want other people to have these same opportunities.

Amanda SilvaSupporter of President Rousseff
Amanda Silva
BBC

'Down to the wire'

Screengrab of reporter Daniel Gallas on TV
BBC World

Reporter Daniel Gallas in Sao Paulo tells BBC World News that although things are "not looking good" for Dilma Rousseff, many of the people due to vote later on will be supporting her.

"It's going to be down to the wire," he says.

Optimism increases in 'yes' camp

Optimism is increasing among opponents of President Rousseff as the votes in favour of her impeachment continue to rise.

Demonstrators react as they look on at a big screen showing a session to review the request for President Dilma Rousseff"s impeachment in Brasilia, during a protest against Rousseff at Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo, Brazil, April 17, 2016
Reuters
Brazilians in favor of the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff react while watching the televised voting of the Lower House of Congress over her impeachment in Brasilia, Brazil April 17, 2016.
Reuters

Rousseff's critics only 100 votes short now

Opponents of President Rousseff are now only 100 votes short of the necessary 342 needed to send a motion to impeach her to the Senate. Another 185 lawmakers have yet to vote. 

President-to-be?

Michel Temer is the Vice President of Brazil and will become president if Dilma Rousseff is impeached.

This photograph shows him watching the proceedings in Congress, as vote after vote stacks up against Ms Rousseff.

Temer sorri ao acompanhar votação do impeachment pela TV uol.com/bxjJlx

Temer sorri ao acompanhar votação do impeachment pela TV uol.com/bxjJlx

House Speaker Eduardo Cunha votes

The speaker of the lower house, Eduardo Cunha, has voted in favour of impeachment proceeding against President Dilma Rousseff. Mr Cunha has been one of the key figures in this political drama. Once an ally of Ms Rousseff, he has turned into one of her fiercest rivals. Mr Cunha is facing legal problems of his own and his critics say his support for Ms Rousseff's impeachment is hypocritical. Mr Cunha is accused of taking millions of dollars in bribes, which he denies. 

'Respect the ballot box'

In Dilma Rousseff's last post on Facebook, she used a hashtag that translates as "respect the ballot box", which seems to be directed at the MPs who want to see her impeached.

She was narrowly re-elected to the presidency in 2014, with 51.6% of the vote.

Her post also calls the impeachment proceedings a "coup".

photo of Dilma Rousseff tweet
Twitter

Number of MPs who have voted rises to 300

Three hundred MPs have now voted in Brazil's lower house. Of these, 224 have voted in favour of the impeachment proceedings against Dilma Rousseff. But in order for the motion to make it to the next stage, another 118 will have to add their votes to the "yes" camp. 

'Yes' votes reach 200

Two hundred lawmakers in Brazil's lower house of Congress have now voted in favour of impeachment proceedings against President Rousseff to proceed. They need 342 votes in order for the motion to go to the Senate. Two-hundred-and-fifty-nine MPs are yet to vote.