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Summary

  1. More than 800 people have been killed in Haiti and four in the Dominican Republic
  2. Matthew is now a Category Two hurricane, as the eye of the storm stays just off Florida coast
  3. Four people have been killed in Florida and more than a million left without power
  4. Flooding could be severe in coastal areas of Florida, Georgia and South Carolina
  5. North Carolina could also be affected as the storm moves north in days ahead

Live Reporting

By Yaroslav Lukov, Roland Hughes, Vanessa Barford, David Molloy and David Walker

All times stated are UK

We're concluding our live page coverage for now

Here's a summary of the latest developments:

In Haiti, more than 800 people were killed earlier this week

  • In Haiti, more than 800 people have died
  • In the US state of Florida, four deaths have been reported, with more than a million left without power
  • Hurricane Matthew is now moving northward just off the coast of Georgia
  • Flooding could be severe in coastal areas of Georgia and also South Carolina
  • Meteorologists predict the weakening of the storm over the next 48 hours

You can follow all the latest updates on this and other stories on the BBC News website.

Thanks for staying with us!

Storm weakening forecast during next 48 hours

Here's the latest update (03:00 GMT) by the National Hurricane Center.

It says the eye of the storm is "continuing northward just off" the coast of Georgia.

"Although weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours, Matthew is expected to remain a hurricane while the centre is near the coast," the NHC adds.

A screen grab from National Hurricane Center
National Hurricane Center

Aid vehicles getting through in Haiti's affected areas

Julie Hard, emergency response team leader from the Americares charity, based in Haiti's capital Port-au-Prince, tells the BBC that most of the major bridges in the affected areas have been "washed out and destroyed by this storm".

"So we're quite content that the water levels have gone down and now some vehicles are getting through and people are beginning to make their way to the areas in Les Cayes and now we're just reaching Jeremie to be able to provide aid," Ms Hard adds.

Devastated Haiti areas still largely cut off

In Haiti, some aid has been brought in to the devastated areas.

But aid agencies warn that the region remains largely cut off with access possible only by helicopter or sea.

People try to get food at a shelter in Les Cayes, Haiti. Photo: 7 October 2016
Reuters
People try to get food at a shelter in Les Cayes, Haiti

Warnings for Georgia and North Carolina

In its latest update from 22:00 local time on Friday (02:00 GMT Saturday), the National Hurricane Center warns that "rising water levels expected along the Georgia and South Carolina coasts in the next few hours".

Death toll in Florida reaches four

At least four people are now known to have died in Florida, officials say.

Two women were killed by falling trees, and two others died from carbon monoxide fumes while running a generator in their garage.

'Trees bending over' on Tybee Island, Georgia, as storm approaches

The hurricane is expected to pass near Tybee Island, Georgia, early on Saturday.

Despite a mandatory evacuation ordered on Wednesday, some residents have decided to stay.

One local resident says "trees are bending over" and it is "raining sideways" as the storm approaches, the Associated Press reports.

A car passes a sign posted as people evacuate from Tybee Island, Georgia
Reuters

Hurricane 'well north' of Florida

US meteorologist Zachary Maloch says the storm is now "well north" of south-western Florida, and he expects an "amazing weekend".

#HurricaneMatthew is now well north of SW Florida and gorgeous views are leading us into what will be a pretty nice… twitter.com/i/web/status/7…

Screen grab from Zachary Maloch's tweet
Zachary Maloch's tweet

Latest update from National Hurricane Center

The latest update from the National Hurricane Center. 

It says that at 20:00 local time on Friday (00:00 GMT Saturday) the eye of the storm was just off the coast of Georgia and north-eastern Florida, about 55 miles (90km) north-east of Jacksonville Beach, Florida, and 105 miles south-east of Savannah, Georgia.

The maximum sustained winds were 110mph.

Matthew is moving northward at 12mph.

A screen grab from National Hurricane Center
National Hurricane Center

Safest place to park car - living room

One US family has decided that the safest place for their vehicle was... in the living room...

Someone parked their car in the living room because of Hurricane Matthew on.mash.to/2cXqaCI

Someone parked their car in the living room because of Hurricane Matthew on.mash.to/2cXqaCI

Curfew in Charleston as hurricane approaches

In South Carolina, the authorities in the city of Charleston have announced a curfew from midnight to 06:00 local time on Saturday - when the hurricane is expected to hit the coast.

Local officials hope the measure will keep people off the streets and prevent possible looting.

Closed shops on Charleston's historic King Street
Getty Images
Closed shops on Charleston's historic King Street

No entry east of US Route 1 in parts of Florida

Authorities in St Augustine and the barrier islands, Florida, are preventing people from entering the area east of the major road - US Route 1. 

View more on twitter

Damage in Florida - photo gallery

As Matthew continues to batter Florida's coast, here are some images of the damage the hurricane has already caused in the US state.

Huge waves pound a pier in Jacksonville, Florida
Getty Images
Huge waves pound a pier in Jacksonville
A fallen tree near a house in Daytona Beach, Florida
Reuters
Close shave: A tree falls near a house in Daytona Beach
Local residents wade through a flooded street in Jacksonville
Getty Images
Local residents wade through a flooded street in Jacksonville
People look at a flooded street from their house in St Augustine, Florida
Getty Images
People look at a flooded street from their house in St Augustine
A boat washed ashore amid storm debris in Melbourne, Florida
AP
A boat washed ashore amid storm debris in Melbourne

BBC travels with medical mission to Haiti town

The BBC travelled with a medical team to the southern town of Port Salut in Haiti. More than 800 are dead across the nation.

Nick Bryant reports.   

Haiti Hurricane Matthew death toll rises to 800

Rainfall totals rise

As of 18:00 local time, rainfall totals for large parts of east Florida were eight inches (20cm) or higher, the National Weather Service said.

A heatmap provided by the US National Weather service shows concentrated rainfall increasing in intensity on the east coast.
@NWSEastern

Torn roofs and flooded streets

Local TV reporter Brittany Dionne has been wading through the streets of St Augustine, Florida, where she spotted a mobile home with its roof apparently torn off.

View more on twitter

Two dead in US

The death toll from Hurricane Matthew in the United States is now at least two.

The Sheriff's Office in Putnam County, Florida, said a woman died when a tree fell on a camper van she was sheltering in. Another male occupant survived with minor injuries.

An earlier death was reported after a woman in her 60s was killed by another falling tree in Volusia County.

Slower winds, but with flooding danger

Matthew is now a Category Two hurricane, the US National Weather Service says - but heavy flooding still presents a danger.

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Police: Hunker down

Jacksonville's Sheriff's Office urged residents to stay home while posting images of collapsing power lines and falling trees along the roads. 

View more on twitter
View more on twitter

Storm surge pummels Florida coastline

Matthew ripped away roofs and toppled trees while a storm surge brought massive flooding in places like St. Augustine and Cocoa Beach. 

Some residents were trapped inside their homes due to the rising water.

Wind and water from Hurricane Matthew batter downtown in St. Augustine, Florida.
AP
Rob Birch checks on his car which floated out of his drive way as Hurricane Matthew passes through the area in St Augustine, Florida.
Getty Images
Kaleigh Black, 14, left, and Amber Olsen, 12, run for cover as a squall with rain and wind from the remnants of Hurricane Matthew pelt them as they explore the Cocoa Beach Pier.
AP
People look out at the flooded street in front of their home as Hurricane Matthew passes through the area in St Augustine, Florida
Getty Images
Heavy waves caused by Hurricane Matthew pounds the boat docks at the Sunset Bar and Grill on Cocoa Beach, Florida
Getty Images

First US death directly caused by Matthew reported

The first US death directly related to the storm has been confirmed in Daytona Beach, Florida. 

A woman in her 60s went outside to feed her animals after the storm had subsided and was struck by a falling tree, according to Jim Dinneen, Volusia County manager.

More than 800 are dead in Haiti after Matthew devastated the region. 

The story of hurricane Matthew so far

More than a million without power

The Florida Public Service Commission announced more than a million residents were without power as of 15:00 ET (20:00 GMT).

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First World problems

President Obama urged Americans to help the people of Haiti, where the impact of the hurricane has been much worse than in the US. 

But for some of Americans, the hurricane has meant other priorities:

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twitter
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twitter

And food was a priority as well as coffee

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twitter
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And then: what and how to watch

facebook
facebook

And those who weren’t worried about their stomachs or the TV were fretting about holiday plans

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twitter
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Meanwhile, one company in Miami found a silver lining to the weather - offering a discount on Botox to deal with all those stress lines

instagram
instagram

Jacksonville Beach streets under water

Steven Dial, a reporter with Jacksonville's First Coast News network, has been out in the streets of Jacksonville Beach - that right now, due to powerful storm surge, resemble rivers.

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Here's another video by one of his colleagues:

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And another view of the city:

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Reports of serious storm surge damage

Across social media, there are growing numbers of reports of serious storm surge damage in some Florida cities - Daytona Beach, St Augustine and Jacksonville Beach in particular.

On the plus side, high tide peaked about two hours ago in that area - but the risk of storm surge of up to 9ft remains high in cities to the north.

Water covers Beach Street in Daytona Beach, Florida
Getty Images
Water covers Beach Street in Daytona Beach, Florida
A pump station at a gas station lies on the ground in Daytona Beach
Getty Images
A pump station at a gas station lies on the ground

The US National Weather Service put together this video to explain what storm surge is:

View more on youtube

Where is Matthew right now?

flooding
Getty Images
The International Speedway Boulevard in Daytona Beach is experiencing flooding

The National Hurricane Center has just put out an update: the hurricane is some 25 miles (40km) east-northeast of Ormond Beach, Florida, and some 60 miles from Jacksonville.

They also note that maximum wind speeds are sustained at 115mph (185km/h).

The storm surge is now much more likely than the wind to cause damage and injury. 

View more on twitter

Storm surge batters Jacksonville Beach

This dramatic footage was filmed by a local CBS News producer in the city of Jacksonville Beach, to the east of the main city of Jacksonville.

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Hurricane Matthew from space

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And here, scientists at Nasa explain the science behind the hurricane:

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Images of devastation in Haiti

UN Mission in Haiti in the town of Jeremie
Getty Images
The western cities of Les Cayes and Jeremie, pictured, suffered the full force of the storm
UN Mission in Haiti in the town of Jeremie
Getty Images

Click here to read our latest article on Haiti, where the death toll is now more than 800.

'Watch and wait'

Laura Bicker, BBC News, New Smyrna Beach

There's nothing to do here but watch and wait. For 12 hours our shelter has been battered by wind and rain. It feels relentless.

Occasionally you hear the crack of a tree as a gust rips down branches or you see debris whipping past the window.

The sound of the wind is the eeriest. At its worst it rivals the noise of a diesel train.

It whips up the water making it difficult to tell whether you're being hit by driving rain or sea spray.

Most people here seem to have taken the warnings seriously. Windows and doors have been boarded up as prime beach front property is abandoned in favour of safer ground.

No one is out on the streets and a curfew remains in place until tomorrow morning. The real fear here is of a storm surge and coastal flooding.

Matthew is also proving to be unpredictable and the storm is taking its time to move up the coast.

That means no one is really sure if the worst is over. As I said... nothing to do now but watch and wait and hope that Florida will be out of danger soon.

US Navy ship steams towards Haiti

The USS Mesa Verde is on its way to Haiti to help the relief effort with three heavy lift helicopters, bulldozers, fresh water, food, medicine and first aid supplies, the US Navy says. The ship also has a surgical team which can work out of two operating rooms on board.

BreakingHaiti death toll rises

More than 800 people are now known to have been killed in Haiti by the hurricane that struck on Tuesday.

Live feed from Jacksonville

A journalist in the city, that is bearing the brunt of the winds, is hosting a Facebook Live session:

View more on facebook

Matthew uproots more trees

News channel in Jacksonville tweets...

Trees are falling left and right due to wind whipping through the area. Please stay inside and stay safe.
Trees are falling left and right due to wind whipping through the area. Please stay inside and stay safe.

Trees are falling left and right due to wind whipping through the area. Please stay inside and stay safe.

Clear-up begins in southern Florida

AP
Debris is removed from a street in Cocoa, near Orlando.
Workers are out on the streets in parts of Florida where the hurricane has passed by. Here debris is removed from a street in Cocoa, near Cape Canaveral.

Obama asked to declare major disaster in Florida

Florida Governor Rick Scott has requested that President Obama declare a major disaster for the state as a result of the storm, his office says. If approved, it will provide federal resources to support recovery efforts. Governor Scott added: "This storm has now impacted a little over half of our east coast, and we expect to see severe impacts as it approaches north-east Florida. We will not hesitate to get our communities the resources they need to respond to families and we will continue to make requests to the federal government as needed."