7 questions on British food

Regional food quiz

The last traditional oatcake shop in Stoke-on-Trent, where customers are served through the front window of a terraced house, is to close. It used to be common for the Staffordshire staple to be sold this way. How much do you know about other regional foods?

Hole in the Wall shop in stoke

1.) Multiple Choice Question

Staffordshire oatcakes have sustained locals for years. Records reportedly show they have been eaten in the area since when?

Staffordshire oatcake
  1. 16th Century
  2. 17th Century
  3. 18th Century

2.) Multiple Choice Question

Both counties are famous for their cream teas, but in which one does tradition dictate you put the cream on your scone first?

Scone with cream and jam
  1. Devon
  2. Cornwall

3.) Multiple Choice Question

Which of these is not a regional food?

Woman sitting at a table
  1. Bedfordshire Clanger
  2. Bosworth Jumble
  3. Brighton Badge

4.) Multiple Choice Question

Which star is said to have called laverbread Welshman's caviar?

  1. Richard Burton
    Richard Burton
  2. Tom Jones
    Tom Jones
  3. Anthony Hopkins
    Anthony Hopkins

Info

The seaweed is boiled for several hours to form a rich puree-like consistency. It is often served rolled with fine oatmeal and fried into crisp patties with eggs, bacon and cockles for a traditional Welsh breakfast.

Laverbread

5.) Missing Word Question

Northumberland Singing *

  1. Heavies
  2. Huffkins
  3. Hinnies

6.) Multiple Choice Question

"Seven Good Things of Sussex" is an old rhyme about food from the county. It is celebrates the importance of what in the area?

  1. Rivers and the coastline
    A river
  2. Fruit trees
    Apple tree
  3. Hops and barley
    Hops and barley

7.) Multiple Choice Question

Which county was voted Britain's favourite regional food spot for 2011?

British strawberries
  1. Cornwall
  2. Lincolnshire
  3. Wiltshire

Answers

  1. It's the 17th Century. Variations of oatcakes are made in different parts of the UK, including Cheshire, Derbyshire and parts of north Wales. Scottish oatcakes are famous worldwide, but they are more biscuit-based.
  2. It's Devon. The order is cream first, then the jam. In Cornwall it is the opposite. The debate about which is best rages on - and probably always will.
  3. It's a Brighton Badge. A Bedfordshire Clanger is an elongated suet pastry with a savoury filling at one end and a sweet filling at the other. A speciality of Leicestershire, Bosworth Jumbles are sweet biscuits shaped like an "S". Small, flat cakes, usually served in pairs and sandwiched with a layer of apricot jam are called Brighton Buttons, not Badges.
  4. It's Richard Burton. It has been a traditional food in south Wales for centuries. It is made from the seaweed porphyra, known as laver.
  5. It's hinnies. They are a traditional type of scone or griddle cake. Singing refers to the sizzle they make when they are cooked. Kentish Huffkins are a type of long, flat roll and Sussex heavies are also like a scone.
  6. It's rivers and the coastline. The rhyme, written by William Ward-Higgs in 1907, celebrates the likes of Chichester lobster and mullet of Arundel. The only "good thing" not to come from the river or coastline is the seventh, which is the wheatear of Bourne - a small bird.
  7. It's Lincolnshire, followed closely by Cornwall. The poll was part of British Food Fortnight and 22,000 people voted. Regional dishes from the area include Lincolnshire sausages, Poacher Cheese, haslet and plum bread.

Your Score

0 - 3 : Still hungry

4 - 6 : Microwave meal

7 - 7 : Stuffed

For past quizzes including our weekly news quiz, 7 days 7 questions, expand the grey drop-down below - also available on the Magazine page (and scroll down).

Find out more about regional delicacies with BBC Food, or test your own cooking skills with classic British recipes.

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