Quiz of the week's news

Info

It's the Magazine's 7 days, 7 questions quiz - an opportunity to prove to yourself and others that you are a news oracle. Failing that, you can always claim to have had better things to do during the past week than swot up on current affairs.

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1.) Multiple Choice Question

An animated safety video Dumb Ways to Die has become Australia's fastest-spreading viral video, with 30m YouTube views and more than 300 parodies. What is it warning against?

Dumb Ways to Die
  1. Sharks
  2. Trains
  3. Spreading germs?

2.) Multiple Choice Question

Prince William enthusiastically accepted a personalised gift for himself and his wife - saying "I'll keep that" - during a tour of Cambridge. What was it?

The Duchess of Cambridge
  1. Furry dice for their car
  2. A bottle of beer
  3. A babygro

3.) Multiple Choice Question

Thermal pictures of one of Saturn's moons show an image that resembles one of the following characters - which?

Saturn
  1. Elmo
  2. Pac-Man
  3. An Angry Bird

Info

According to this Nasa picture, the moon Tethys strongly resembles the 1980s arcade game. A similar feature was spotted in 2010 on Mimas, another Saturnian moon.

Saturn moon

4.) Multiple Choice Question

Details of "Project A119" - a US proposal to intimidate the Soviet Union during the Cold War - resurfaced in the media this week. What did the project reportedly propose?

Top secret stamp
  1. Blowing up the Ural Mountains
  2. Nuking the Moon
  3. Building "spaceships" to fly over Moscow

5.) Multiple Choice Question

Which animal was captured after running through the streets of New York?

New York
  1. An emu
  2. A zebra
  3. A giraffe

6.) Multiple Choice Question

Which character inspired a fake job advert on the Direct Gov website?

  1. Carrie Mathison
    Carrie Mathison
  2. Malcolm Tucker
    Malcolm Tucker
  3. James Bond
    Daniel Craig

7.) Missing Word Question

Divers search Irish lake for rare * balls

  1. golf
  2. ice
  3. cannon

Answers

  1. It's trains - specifically Metro Trains in Melbourne. The video features coloured pill-shaped figures demonstrating ridiculous ways to die, such as using one's private parts as piranha bait. The final lines highlight the dangers of standing on the edge of the rail platform and running across tracks.
  2. It was a personalised baby romper suit, which had a picture of a helicopter and the words "Daddy's little co-pilot" on it.
  3. It's Pac-Man.
  4. It was a nuclear attack on the Moon. The US Air Force has always declined to comment on the reports, which were based on an interview with a scientist who said he was familiar with the project.
  5. It was a zebra. The animal and a pony were spotted trotting through a car park on Staten Island after escaping from a petting zoo. According to footage captured on a local shop owner's phone, two men in suits chased after them with lassoes. An emu was captured by the police in the English town of Barnstaple.
  6. It was James Bond. The advert on the website, which is used for recruitment, said it was looking for a "target elimination specialist", salary 50,000-60,000, with "performance bonuses on completion of missions".
  7. It's golf. Divers have begun a search in Donegal for what they believe could be some of the world's rarest golf balls. The gutta percha balls once belonged to golfing legend Old Tom Morris, who won the Open four times in the 1860s. It was reported that some of his golf balls have fetched thousands of pounds at auction.

Your Score

0 - 3 : Bogey

4 - 6 : Par

7 - 7 : Albatross

For past quizzes including our weekly news quiz, 7 days 7 questions, expand the grey drop-down below - also available on the Magazine page (and scroll down)

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