Quiz of the Year: 52 weeks 52 questions, part one

Year-end quiz

'Tis the season to cast an eye back over the events of 2012. But how much do you remember? Test yourself with the Magazine's four-part compilation of the year's quizzes. Part one covers January to March.

Slide

1.) Multiple Choice Question

Silent film The Artist scooped three Golden Globes in January. What was the name of the scene-stealing terrier?

The Artist, dog
  1. Lucky
  2. Ziggy
  3. Uggie

2.) Multiple Choice Question

Who is Prince Harry pictured with in this photograph from March?

Jamaica PM
  1. Jamaican Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller
  2. Michelle Obama
  3. Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

3.) Multiple Choice Question

Why did the English version of Wikipedia "go dark" in January?

Wiki
  1. It was infected by the Ramnit worm
  2. In protest against censorship proposals
  3. Over plagiarism row

4.) Missing Word Question

* to cost Disney $200m

  1. Movie flop
  2. Theme park
  3. Tinker Bell

5.) Multiple Choice Question

Astronomers looking for the true colour of our galaxy the Milky Way revealed that it is...

Milky Way
  1. Pure white
  2. Eggy yellow
  3. Cappuccino

6.) Multiple Choice Question

In January, a scathing "rejection letter" posted online by a 19-year-old woman became an internet hit. What or who was the letter directed at?

Rejected
  1. An un-named suitor
  2. A prestigious university college
  3. A top banking firm

7.) Multiple Choice Question

In February, a British cat became an overnight sensation on Twitter. What had the moggy done?

cat
  1. Invaded the pitch during a Premier League clash
  2. Started a fight in Downing Street
  3. Travelled alone from Edinburgh to Glasgow by bus

8.) Multiple Choice Question

Nike had to apologise for giving a new training shoe - launched to coincide with St Patrick's Day - which of the following nicknames?

Nike
  1. Black and Tan
  2. Red Hand
  3. Orange Order

9.) Multiple Choice Question

In January astronomers released infrared images of this extraordinary eye-shaped celestial formation. What is it?

sky
  1. A nebula
  2. A black hole
  3. A quark star

10.) Missing Word Question

* lover David Cameron defends VAT hike

  1. Tea
  2. Caravan
  3. Pasty

11.) Multiple Choice Question

A US TV network apologised for the behaviour of British pop star M.I.A. during the Super Bowl's half-time show. What did she do?

M.I.A
  1. Bared a breast
  2. Extended her middle finger
  3. Walked on the US flag

12.) Multiple Choice Question

What did Irish runner Richard Donovan reveal helped him become the only man to run seven marathons on seven continents in fewer than five days?

Donovan
  1. Beer
  2. Burger
  3. Cigarettes

Answers

  1. It was Uggie, whose memoirs were published in October - written with the help of a British journalist.
  2. It's Portia Simpson Miller. The royal visited Jamaica in March as part of a Diamond Jubilee tour. He charmed those he met on the island - including Usain Bolt, whom he beat in a race by heading off while the runner was distracted.
  3. Wikipedia made its English-language site "go dark" as part of protests against proposed anti-piracy laws in the US.
  4. It's "movie flop". Disney had high hopes for film John Carter, which was based on a story by Tarzan creator Edgar Rice Burroughs. It took a $200m writedown after the film, which cost $250m to make, flopped.
  5. It's pure white. "If you looked at new spring snow, which has a fine grain size, about an hour after dawn or an hour before sunset, you'd see the same spectrum of light," Prof Jeffrey Newman said.
  6. It was an Oxford college. Elly Nowell, who had attended an interview at Magdalen College to read law, parodied the institution's own rejection letters, stating that it "did not quite meet the standard" of other universities.
  7. It invaded the pitch at Liverpool's Anfield Stadium some 10 minutes into a game between Liverpool and Tottenham, hovering in Tottenham's penalty area. The "cat's" light-hearted tweets gained tens of thousands of followers.
  8. It's Black and Tan. The $90 (57) trainer was officially the SB Dunk Low but was nicknamed Black and Tan because its colours were reminiscent of a pint of Guinness mixed with Harp pale ale. The Black and Tans were a British paramilitary force that operated in Ireland during the Irish War of Independence.
  9. It's a nebula - the helix nebula, in fact, located some 700-light years from Earth. The image was captured by the Paranal Observatory in Chile.
  10. It's pasty. David Cameron said he "loves a hot pasty", but defended the decision to put VAT on all sales of the snack.
  11. She extended her middle finger. Broadcaster NBC later apologised for the "inappropriate" and "spontaneous gesture".
  12. It was beer. Donovan said that he was "absolutely wrecked" by a combination of a lack of sleep, running and travelling through different time zones and temperatures. He said he had one bottle of beer during the race "for some carbs" and one at the end.

Your Score

0 - 4 : Half

5 - 9 : Schooner

10 - 12 : Pint

PLUS there's a special bonus question each day.

Picture one

In addition to the 12 questions above, we also pose an extra puzzler for each of the four parts of this quiz. That's how we reached the magic total of 52 questions.

With each part of the quiz we publish photographs - the first of which is on the right. What is the link between the images over the four days? Part two is here, with part three here and the final instalment here.

For a complete archive of past quizzes and our weekly news quiz, 7 days 7 questions, visit the Magazine page and scroll down. You can follow the Magazine on Twitter and on Facebook.

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