Who, what, why: Why is champagne traditional for smashing on ships?

 
A bottle of champagne smashing against a ship

The Queen will smash a bottle of whisky on the hull of the new aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth in a break from the traditional champagne. But how did champagne become the tradition, asks Lucy Townsend.

When Queen Victoria launched HMS Royal Arthur in 1891 she smashed a bottle of champagne against it. It is believed to be one of the first instances of the drink being used in this way.

"It was a very prestigious warship with a royal name so champagne would have seemed fitting, it's a celebratory drink, but before that it had been the tradition to use [other] wine," says John Graves, curator of ship history at the National Maritime Museum.

Launching a ship has always been accompanied by ceremony. The Babylonians would sacrifice oxen, while the Vikings sacrificed a slave to propitiate their sea god.

Wine became customary in England in the 15th Century when a representative of the king would drink a goblet of wine, sprinkle wine on the deck and then throw the goblet overboard.

The answer

  • Champagne started being used in the late 19th Century
  • It was thought to be more celebratory than wine, which had been traditional previously

"It would have been much cheaper to smash a bottle," Graves adds.

"In the 18th Century the Royal Navy launched so many ships that throwing a silver goblet overboard each time would have become very expensive - so they started using bottles.

"It's quite a clear progression. The red of the wine would have looked a bit like the blood from earlier centuries, and the move to champagne would have been all about the celebration - champagne is the aristocrat of wines."

The Duchess of Cambridge watches a bottle of champagne smash against the Royal Princess ship The Duchess of Cambridge watches a bottle of champagne smash against the 'Royal Princess' ship
Mrs Leif Egeland, wife of the South African High Commissioner, smashes a bottle against the Intermediate Class liner MV 'Bloemfontein Castle' at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast Mrs Leif Egeland, wife of the South African High Commissioner, breaks a bottle against the Intermediate Class liner MV 'Bloemfontein Castle' at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast
A boy prepares to smash a bottle against his boat This is probably not champagne

In the US, whiskey has been used in the past - the USS Princeton and the USS Raritan were launched using whiskey in the 1845 and 43.

In 1797 the captain of the frigate USS Constitution broke a bottle of madeira wine to mark her launch, while in 1862, Commodore Charles Stewart christened the New Ironsides in Philadelphia by smashing a bottle of brandy over her bow.

"During prohibition water was used in the US to launch a ship," Graves adds. "It would be water from the sea the vessel was to be launched into."

But champagne is now the drink smashed against most ships - though Graves adds that there may be a better alternative.

"I have been told by many ship builders that cheap cava creates a more spectacular display - it's much bubblier that champagne."

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  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 322.

    @97 David (highest rated)

    a)
    ok

    b)
    sure, what about all the other whiskey companies?

    c)
    you know that requires an increase in global demand for "engines"?

    d)
    unlikely knowing our last few governments..

    e)
    giving me and my friend 100k per year to run around in circles means jobs..

    popular opinion is so romantic..

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 321.

    320. Steve

    1. "bash the English" ?

    Quote a single anti-English comment on this HYS.... You'll find none, but you'll find plenty anti-Scottish.

    2. as 80% of the UK population are English, then roughly 80% of the cost of the ship was paid for by the English.

    Correct.. But as all 'Better Together' unionists know, this ship is no more English than it is Welsh, Scottish or NI.

    YES 18/9

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 320.

    This is a HYS about an aircraft carrier, but sad yes-voters seem to want to turn every HYS into an opportunity to bash the English.
    I've no plans to join in the trolling, but it would seem logical that as 80% of the UK population are English, then roughly 80% of the cost of the ship was paid for by the English. I think the ship workers appreciate that the UK keeps them in jobs.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 319.

    317. Other places we don't pay for. For this site we all pay £150 per annum. I think that gives us all the right to complain.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 318.

    #315. Nutter244

    "Paid for with ENGLISH money."

    ---

    Paid for with NI, WELSH, SCOTTISH & ENGLISH money.

    YES 18/9

 

Comments 5 of 322

 

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