EA removes gun shop links from Medal of Honor site

Screenshot from Medal of Honor Medal of Honor has been a major title since 1999

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Links to browse and buy real weapons featured in popular war-based video game Medal of Honor have been removed from the title's website.

It followed pressure from groups suggesting that video games were responsible for inciting real-world violence.

A representative for publisher EA said: "We felt it was inappropriate and took the links down."

Company logos, and descriptions of the weapons, remain on the game's website.

In the wake of the school shootings in Newtown, video game makers were criticised by influential US lobby group the National Rifle Association.

"There exists in this country, sadly, a callous, corrupt and corrupting shadow industry that sells and stows violence against its own people," said NRA vice president Wayne LaPierre at a press conference last week.

A special panel led by US vice president Joe Biden is currently examining potential ways to curb gun violence in the country.

Among proposals under consideration is a study into any possible links between children's exposure to video games and violence.

'Unfair advantage!'

On the website for Medal of Honor, which has for years been a major seller for EA since the first title's release in 1999, news updates on the latest title discuss "partnerships" with weapons manufacturers.

A partners page displays 14 logos of companies producing combat equipment - but no longer link directly to the firms' individual sites.

In a separate news item on EA's main website, Medal of Honor's executive producer Greg Goodrich writes: "So head over to the Magpul website and gain an unfair advantage!". It refers to a Colorado-based firearms firm.

A promotional video showing the Magpul equipment was also released by the companies.

Real-world weapons are commonplace in video games which, like other entertainment forms, strive for accuracy and authenticity.

Earlier this year, CBS News reported that seven US Navy Seals were reprimanded after allegedly sharing classified material with games designers working on Medal of Honor.

One of the Seals took part in the raid which resulted in the death of Osama Bin Laden.

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