Dishonored wins Best Game Bafta at 2013 video game awards

Dishonored screenshot Dishonored won the Best Game award despite not having secured any of the other prizes

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Dishonored has been named Best Game at the 2013 British Academy of Film and Television Arts (Bafta) video games awards.

The first-person action title is set in a historic plague-ridden city in which the player uses special powers and swordplay to seek revenge on enemies.

Its developer Arkane Studios made a joke apology to Brits for the way it had spelt the game's name.

Journey - a PlayStation title lacking words and enemies - took five awards.

These included Online Multiplayer, Artistic Achievement, Game Design, Original Music and Audio Achievement.

It was created by Thatgamecompany - a seven-year-old studio founded by graduates from the University of Southern California. It involves travelling across a huge desert landscape and communicating with other players - connected via the internet - by making wordless musical chirps.

Other atypical titles also did well.

Bafta 2013 Games Awards

Best Game: Dishonored

Online Multiplayer: Journey

Game Design: Journey

Artistic Achievement: Journey

Original Music: Journey

Audio Achievement: Journey

Mobile & Handheld: The Walking Dead

Story: The Walking Dead

Game Innovation: The Unfinished Swan

Debut Game: The Unfinished Swan

Action: Far Cry 3

British Game: The Room

Performer: Danny Wallace - Thomas Was Alone

Family: Lego Batman 2

Strategy: Xcom - Enemy Unknown

Ones to Watch: Kind of a Big Deal - Starcrossed

Online Browser: SongPop

Sports/Fitness: New Star Soccer

Fellowship: Gabe Newell

The Walking Dead - a spin-off from the zombie-themed television series - won two prizes: Story and Mobile & Handheld.

Players take decisions about how to interact with other characters within set time limits through a series of five episodes. The options they take have lasting consequences and many reviewers have noted its success at eliciting strong emotional reactions from players to some of the characters' fates.

The Unfinished Swan was the other title to take two prizes - Debut Game and Innovation. To play it gamers explore an unfinished world which initially has its details revealed by splattering ink blots from a magic paintbrush,

The Room took the British Game Award. It challenges players to solve puzzles in a 3D environment in order to reveal the secrets of a mysterious box. It was created by Guildford-based Fireproof Studios and had previously won Apple's 2012 iPad game of the year.

Kind of a Big Deal - the developer of Starcrossed - took the Ones To Watch award. The Windows Phone title was created during a nine-week-long games competition run by the University of Abertay in Dundee last summer.

In addition the chief executive of Valve - the creator of the influential science fiction games Half Life and Portal, as well as the Steam community and marketplace - was honoured with an Academy Fellowship, Bafta's highest accolade.

"On behalf of everyone at Valve, and all of the gamers who have gone with us on this adventure over the last few years - thank you very much," he said in a short acceptance speech.

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