Gamers to pay for key Xbox One features

Xbox One buttons Gamers will have to pay to take advantage of some features of the Xbox One

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Key features of Microsoft's Xbox One console, which is expected to go on sale in November, will only be available with an annual subscription.

The requirement covers recording and sharing of gameplay videos, making Skype video calls and using a service that finds gaming opponents.

An Xbox Live Gold account that currently costs $60 (£40) will be needed for all these features.

Sony PlayStation 4 owners will also have to pay for some online services.

However, the president of Sony Computer Entertainment confirmed, via a post on Twitter, that its machine would not restrict games recording and streaming features to paid subscribers.

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Microsoft revealed the requirement in an update to webpages detailing the Xbox One's features.

Twitter Sony confirmed it would not restrict games recording to paid subscribers via a tweet

The webpage shows that, as with the current Xbox 360, a Live Gold account is needed if owners want to use their new console for online multiplayer gaming, watch Netflix or similar streaming services and to browse the web via their TV.

In addition, on the Xbox One the annual subscription will let players share videos with friends. The console records a rolling sample of a player's previous five minutes gameplay to make it easier to share key moments.

The payment will also let owners chat to friends via video on Skype and use the OneGuide and SmartMatch services.

OneGuide analyses what Xbox One owners usually watch and recommends TV shows and YouTube content to match. The SmartMatch service links players with other gamers of a similar ability to ensure they are not outclassed in multiplayer matches.

In June, Sony revealed a change to its previous policy which gave all owners of its PlayStation 3 console access to online multiplayer games. With the PlayStation 4, owners will have to pay $50 (£32) a year for a PlayStation Plus account to do the same.

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